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Putting People First

Daily insights on user experience, experience design and people-centred innovation
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Search results for 'portigal'
4 September 2007

People regularly featured on this blog

In alphabetical order:

A
Marko Ahtisaari
Ken Anderson

B
Nik Baerten
Genevieve Bell
Chris Bernard
Tim Berners-Lee
Ralf Beuker
Nina Boesch
Danah Boyd
Stefana Broadbent
Tyler Brûlé
Bill Buxton

C
Jan Chipchase
Hilary Cottam
Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi
Alistair Curtis

D
Uday Dandavate
Liz Danzico
Regine Debatty
Paul Dourish

E
Jyri Engeström
Richard Eisermann

G
Jesse James Garrett
Fabien Girardin
Anand Giridharadas
Bruno Giussani
Adam Greenfield

H
Laurent Haug

I
Mizuko Ito

J
Bob Jacobson
Matt Jones

K
Jonathan Kestenbaum
Anne Kirah
Dirk Knemeyer
Jon Kolko
Mike Kuniavsky

L
Loïc Lemeur
Dan Lockton
Victor Lombardi

M
Nico Macdonald
John Maeda
Ranjit Makkuni
Ezio Manzini
Roger Martin
Stefano Marzano
Simona Maschi
Bruce Mau
Grant McCracken
Jess McMullin
Peter Merholz
Crysta Metcalf
Bill Moggridge
Peter Morville
Ulla-Maaria Mutanen

N
Jakob Nielsen
Donald Norman
Nicolas Nova
Bruce Nussbaum

P
Steve Portigal

R
Carlo Ratti
Howard Rheingold
Louis Rosenfeld
Stephen Rustow

S
Dan Saffer
Nathan Shedroff
Jared Spool
Yaniv Steiner
Bruce Sterling

T
John Thackara

V
Marco van Hout
Rob van Kranenburg
Mark Vanderbeeken
Joannes Vandermeulen
Jeffrey Veen
Timo Veikkola
Michele Visciola
Eric von Hippel

W
Tricia Wang
Luke Wroblewski

Z
Paola Zini
Jan-Christoph Zoels

13 April 2007

The revolution will be televised and then switched off

Xing
Genevieve Bell, Intel’s senior anthropologist, started blogging and the first post immediately describes an intriguing research project on secondary homes.

“We care about how people live, how people want to live, about what matters to them; we strive to understand how technologies are used, understood, and imagined in homes around the world; and finally we seek to foster and develop technologies that provide a seamless fit with — and enhance — cultural, social, spiritual values and practices. (And yes, this is real work, and yes, it is an accepted way of thinking about technology, technology development and innovation. And yes, it is surprising to see this at Intel).

As my team and I are part of Intel’s Digital Home Group, we focus our energies on the ‘home’ in all its many forms and permutations. It is against this backdrop that I have been thinking about and studying ‘domestic satellites’ – homes away from home, or perhaps more precisely places of homefulness away from one’s primary residence. Think of these as dorm rooms, hotel rooms, hospital rooms, elder care facilities, vacation homes, even recreational vehicles, caravans, tents and perhaps your car or cubicle. All the places where we attempt to recreate some version of ‘home’, however incomplete or perhaps deliberately skewed.

I would argue (riffing on classic critical standpoint theory, and Harding’s notion of strong objectivity) that these sites, these domestic satellites, can tell us a whole lot about the nature of the home, precisely because they are a version, not the original rendering, of it. We might learn more about what people value, what they care about, and what frustrates them by seeing how they create home-like experiences away from home. Such domestic extensions also seemed likely to yield interesting technology opportunities in and of themselves – devices that would need to withstand long period of dormancy followed by sudden bursts of activities, or those that were energy conscious or aware, or those that have small format factors, high levels of portability and failsafe reliability and security.”

Although the project is not yet formally analysed, one interesting result is that “in listening to people talk about their second homes, the things they do there, and the things they do not, it is hard not to hear this almost lament, a kind of nostalgia, or longing for a time when technology didn’t feel quite so overwhelming.” People often use them as a place to escape from technology.

So Bell asks, “what should a multinational company that produces technology and technology visions do with such an insight?”

Read full story

(via Steve Portigal)

28 February 2007

Nathan Shedroff on making meaning [Core77]

Nathan Shedroff
Nathan Shedroff, experience design “guru”, author of the seminal Experience Design 1 and co-author of Making Meaning: How Successful Businesses Deliver Meaningful Customer Experiences, sits down with Steve Portigal in San Francisco to talk about the experience and design of experience design.

“Shedroff’s definition gets things started: “Experience design is an approach to design, and you can use that approach in pretty much any discipline—graphic design or industrial design or interaction design, or retail design. It says the dimensions of experience are wider than what those disciplines normally take into account. And if you think wider—through time, multiple senses and other dimensions—then you can create a more meaningful experience.”

And he follows it up with the 5 levels of significance:

  1. Function (“Does this do what I want it to do?”)
  2. Price (“There are lots of cars out there to get me from point A to point B”)
  3. Emotion (“That’s where lifestyle is engaged. How does this make me feel?”)
  4. Identity or Value (“This is subconscious: “Would I be caught dead with this?; am I a Nike fan, or an Adidas fan?”)
  5. Meaning (Not “Is this me?”, but “Does this fit my reality?” “Does this even fit inside the world as I perceive it?”)

- Listen to interview (mp3, 45 min)
- Download audio file (right click or CTRL-click) (mp3, 41.7 mb, 45 min)
- More Core77 broadcasts

12 June 2006

The ethnography of marketing [Business Week]

Computer use in India
The new core competency is ethnography. Companies use it to gain insights into the culture and behavior of their customers. But the demands of business are different from those of an anthropologist doing field research. The most obvious is speed. Where anthropologists may take years to do one study, businesses need results in weeks.

The other difference is scope. Global corporations need detailed consumer data from dozens of cultures. In China, the coast and desert, north and south, have different cultures. In India, there are over 100 languages, dozens of castes, and major differences in religion. Companies must gather and compare huge amounts of information.

To address this issue, the Institute of Design under Patrick Whitney and Associate Professor Vijay Kumar have developed the User Insight Tool, an ethnographic methodology designed specifically for business. It relies on disposable cameras, field notebooks, and special software that teases out new understandings from consumer observations.

- Read full story
- Read Business Week profile on Patrick Whitney
- NEW: Read Steve Portigal reflection on this story

31 May 2006

Ecosystems and product innovation

Core77 - Design 2.0
REMINDER

Allan Chochinov of Core77 asked me to remind my readers of the second Design 2.0 discussion on design strategy and innovation, which will take place next week (6 June) in San Francisco. Since Core77 has promoted Putting People First already several times, I do this with pleasure.

The event is entitled “Products and their Ecosystems: understanding the power of context in product innovation“, and features panelists Peter Rojas from Engadget, Diego Rodriguez from IDEO and MetaCool, Steve Portigal from Portigal Consulting and Robyn Waters from RW Trend, all moderated by BusinessWeek’s Jessie Scanlon.

The discussion will address how by “deliberately and strategically designing products for the context in which they live”, companies can create “more imaginative, better integrated, and ultimately more humane offerings [...] that are not only sensitive to their surroundings, but often define them”.

Allan told me also that some mp3 files of the last event on the ingredients of great customer experience, are now online.

As always, this and other events of relevance to the themes of this blog are listed in the experience design calendar.

30 November 2005

New Core77 discussion forum on design and innovation

Core77_forum
The industrial design site Core77 just launched a new discussion board forum on design and innovation, moderated by Steve Portigal.

The site also hosts a great many other discussion forums, including those on design research and on interaction design.

In short, a wealth of material to check out. Unfortunately none of them seem to have rss feeds.

30 November 2005

Virtual anthropology

Virtual_anthropology
The latest issue of trendwatching.com talks about virtual anthropology.

“As consumers around the world pro-actively post, stream if not lead parts of their lives online, you (or your trend team) can now vicariously ‘live’ amongst them, at home, at work, out on the streets. From reading minute-by-minute online diaries or watching live webcam feeds, to diving into tens of millions of tagged pictures uploaded by Flickr-fueled members of Generation C in Mexico, Mauritius, Malaysia and dozens of other countries.”

And Steve Portigal reacts:

“As usual, when you read about a shortcut to actual research written by someone who really has no clue about doing real research, they omit the valuable part – asking questions. Asking why! What is the meaning of the clothing you wear? Tell me a story about why you’ve got those items in your fridge?

It takes skill to unearth the insights – you can’t start and finish with self-reported data. Otherwise, you’re just a step above a mood board or something artifact-based. Insights come from people – from interacting with people, dynamically. Not simply observing their shit.”

28 October 2005

Shopping for innovation

Shopping_for_innovation
What you need to know before hiring a design firm

Steve Portigal and Niti Bhan write about what you need to consider when bringing on strategic design services and hiring a design firm and focus on three key issues: The Problem (defining your needs), the People (who the players are), and the Partnership (the nature of the engagement).

Design firms are businesses, but with unique perspectives and unique work processes. Understanding a bit of the industry culture will go a long way in helping you to establish a successful engagement.

Read full post

2 August 2005

DUX2005 conference in San Francisco

Dux05logo
ACM SIGCHI, ACM SIGGRAPH and AIGA are co-organising the 2005 edition of the Designing for User eXperience conference (DUX2005), focused on how the needs and goals of both users and businesses can be met through design. The conference will take place at Fort Mason Center in San Francisco, CA, November 3-5, 2005.

The three-day conference has one day of tutorials (featuring Marc Rettig, Steve Portigal, Shelley Evenson and others) and two days of presentations.

Go to conference website