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Search results for 'moggridge'
2 December 2007

Changing the change

Mole
Changing the change. Design Visions, Proposals and Tools is an international conference, chaired by Ezio Manzini (blog) of the Politecnico di Milano, on the role and results of design research in the transition towards sustainability. The conference will be held in Torino, Italy, 10 to 12 July 2008, in the framework of Torino World Design Capital, 2008.

Changing the Change seeks to make a significant contribution to a necessary transformation toward a sustainable future. It specifically intends to outline state-of-the-art of design research in terms of visions, proposals and tools with which design can actively and positively take part in the wider social learning process that will have to take place.

“It’s a design research conference with a focus more on results than on methodology” Manzini tells John Thackara, “with an emphasis on what design research can do for sustainability”

At the heart of the conference design researchers will present concrete and documentable research results. This will be complemented by invited keynote speaker’s presentations that will help paint a clearer picture of the common ground from which the conference will take off.

Changing the Change is organised by the Co-ordination of Italian Design Research Doctorates and has a broad International Advisory Committee: Roberto Bartholo (Federal University of Rio de Janeiro), Luigi Bistagnino (Politecnico di Torino), Luisa Collina (Politecnico di Milano), Rachel Cooper (University of Lancaster), Jorge Frascara (University of Alberta), Victor Margolin (University of Illinois at Chicago), Stefano Marzano (Philips Design), Fumi Masuda (Tokyo Zokei University), Bill Moggridge (IDEO), Mugendi M’Rithaa (Cape Peninsula University of Technology), Geetha Narayanan (Srishti School of Art, Design and Technology), Gunter Pauli (Zeri), Yrjö Sotamaa (University of Art and Design Helsinki), Lou Yongqi (Tongji University).

4 September 2007

People regularly featured on this blog

In alphabetical order:

A
Marko Ahtisaari
Ken Anderson

B
Nik Baerten
Genevieve Bell
Chris Bernard
Tim Berners-Lee
Ralf Beuker
Nina Boesch
Danah Boyd
Stefana Broadbent
Tyler Brûlé
Bill Buxton

C
Jan Chipchase
Hilary Cottam
Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi
Alistair Curtis

D
Uday Dandavate
Liz Danzico
Regine Debatty
Paul Dourish

E
Jyri Engeström
Richard Eisermann

G
Jesse James Garrett
Fabien Girardin
Anand Giridharadas
Bruno Giussani
Adam Greenfield

H
Laurent Haug

I
Mizuko Ito

J
Bob Jacobson
Matt Jones

K
Jonathan Kestenbaum
Anne Kirah
Dirk Knemeyer
Jon Kolko
Mike Kuniavsky

L
Loïc Lemeur
Dan Lockton
Victor Lombardi

M
Nico Macdonald
John Maeda
Ranjit Makkuni
Ezio Manzini
Roger Martin
Stefano Marzano
Simona Maschi
Bruce Mau
Grant McCracken
Jess McMullin
Peter Merholz
Crysta Metcalf
Bill Moggridge
Peter Morville
Ulla-Maaria Mutanen

N
Jakob Nielsen
Donald Norman
Nicolas Nova
Bruce Nussbaum

P
Steve Portigal

R
Carlo Ratti
Howard Rheingold
Louis Rosenfeld
Stephen Rustow

S
Dan Saffer
Nathan Shedroff
Jared Spool
Yaniv Steiner
Bruce Sterling

T
John Thackara

V
Marco van Hout
Rob van Kranenburg
Mark Vanderbeeken
Joannes Vandermeulen
Jeffrey Veen
Timo Veikkola
Michele Visciola
Eric von Hippel

W
Tricia Wang
Luke Wroblewski

Z
Paola Zini
Jan-Christoph Zoels

8 April 2007

Consumer technology: is “ease-of-use” a myth?

Ease-of-use
A panel recently discussed the growing problems with product design features vs. the cry for “make it easy to use” and where designers and developers have to address this issue to win back consumers.

Speakers were Bill Moggridge, founder of IDEO; BJ Fogg, founder of the Stanford Persuasive Technology Lab; John Paczkowski, senior editor of AllThingsD.com of the Wall Street Journal; and Tim Plowman of Intel’s Digital Health Group.

The forum, which took place on 4 April, was presented by the MIT Club of Northern California, the Stanford Center for Longevity, the Hasso Plattner Institute of Design at Stanford University, and SmartSilvers Alliance.

EETimes Online has posted an excellent article about the presentation entitled “Ease-of-use crisis: Designers or ‘feature creeps’?”.

A panel of experts on “ease of use” whose experience ranges from technology design to behavioral psychology agreed rather ruefully Wednesday (April 4) that one of the most complicated challenges in electronic engineering is simplicity.

Their conclusions echoed the irony of one audience member—an attorney with Silicon Valley law firm Wilson, Sonsini, Goodrich & Rosati—who defined “technology” as “something that doesn’t quite work yet.”

Panelist B.J. Fogg, a psychologist who founded Stanford University’s Persuasive Technology Lab, summarized the issue by saying that “every possibility you add to an interface increases your likelihood of failure” in the marketplace.

Tim Plowman, a professor who has studied human behavior at the University of California at Berkeley and Santa Clara University, addressed the basic issue of convincing designers to devise interfaces that are intuitively accessible to users of all ages and levels of technical sophistication. “It is much, much harder,” he said, “to achieve simplicity in interaction design.”

Bill Moggridge, founder of IDEO, a firm that designs user-centered products and services, noted that older users are slower to adapt to electronic device complexity because older users are more complex themselves, with “more things on our minds.” He said, “Among us wrinklies, it’s less likely that we’ll get it right away, unlike younger people.”

Read full story

19 February 2007

Advanced programme of CHI 2007 available

CHI 2007
The CHI 2007 organisers have published an “advanced programme” of the conference, which will take place 28 April – 3 May in San Jose, California.

Some highlights:

Opening plenary: “Reaching for the intuitive” by Bill MoggridgeBill will attempt to show how design thinking can harnesses intuitive mental processes, leveraging tacit knowledge as well as the explicit knowledge of logically expressed thoughts. He will give examples of how designers and design teams learn by doing, allowing the subconscious mind to inform intuitions that guide actions. Some of the examples will come from his experience as Cofounder of IDEO, and others will be taken from his recent book Designing Interactions (www.designinginteractions.com), in which he interviews forty influential designers who have shaped our interaction with digital technology.

Interactive session: “Who killed design?: addressing design through an interdisciplinary investigation” with Bill Moggridge (IDEO), Bill Buxton (Microsoft Research), Terry Winograd (Stanford University) and Meg Armstrong (Parsons The New School for Design)This interactive session brings together significant voices from a variety of ‘design-engaged’ disciplines to lead a discussion about the oft-used, but seldom agreed upon notion of ‘Design’. The primary goal of this session is to address ‘Design’ from a much wider variety of perspectives than could occur within any singular discipline. In doing so, the session intends to re-visit [the definitions of] “Design”, “Designer”, and “Designed”.

Closing Plenary: “The mobile as a post-industrial platform for socio-economic development” by Niti BhanThe internet is the foundation of the world wide web of humanity online. Today, there is no such facility on the cellphone platform comparable as yet to the great degree of usability and freedom of movement that browsing currently offers those of us in “broadband nations”.

At the same time there is a great digital divide – between the haves and the have nots. Many have tried with different degrees of success to bridge this chasm, because they all see the potential for growth that unleashing the flow of wealth to and from the bottom-most segments of socioeconomic and geopolitical strata, can effect real change in the standard of living for a great majority on our planet rather than just the fortunate few.The numbers of cellphones sold in the past two years alone in the unexpected markets of the bottom of the pyramid, that includes a surprising numbers of luxury or high end mobiles, far more than any market survey could have predicted even two years ago, is a clear signal of the shift in economic activity. Look at what is already happening now in Bangladesh – microfinance and cellphones; South Africa – banking the unbanked through their cellphones; Uganda – microentreprise using the cellphone and more.The challenge before us today is to ask “What if…?” in the best traditions of creativity and imagination and visualise a near future, within the constraints of existing or installed technology, that could bridge this digital divide and develop the applications and the foundation to provide connectivity, commerce and community on the mobile platform. What kind of difference could this make?”

23 January 2007

Innovation and the prosperity of nations [Core77]

Competitiveness Summit '06
“At the recent Competitiveness Summit, the connections between business and innovation were made starkly clear,” writes Nico Macdonald in a Core77 article.

In November 2005 the UK Treasury published the Cox Review of Creativity in Business, addressing “a question that is vital to the UK’s long-term economic success—namely, how to exploit the nation’s creative skills more fully” where the “emphasis is on the use made of creative skills by smaller businesses, with particular concern for manufacturing.”

This December the UK Design Council, of which report author Sir George Cox is Chairman, convened the Competitiveness Summit ’06 in London to brief people on progress with implementation of the report’s recommendations and ‘build momentum’ around it. Specifically the Summit was intended to showcase the role of creativity and design in UK competitiveness, discuss how they may be further embedded, and examine future trends; consider threats and opportunities from abroad; and examine the role of education and its relationship to industry.

The Competitiveness Summit was probably the most serious and eminent design event in the UK in the last five years, though the balance of the audience was from the design and consultancy industries, government policy and funding, and education, rather than the ‘client side’ of the equation.

Some conference participants:

  • Sir Terence Conran
  • Rt. Hon Alistair Darling MP, UK Secretary of State for Trade and Industry
  • Professor David Gann, Principal of Imperial College London’s Tanaka Business School
  • David Godber, Director of Nissan Design Europe
  • Graham Hitchen, Project Director of the Cox-proposed International Centre for Design and Innovation
  • David Kester, Chief Executive of the Design Council
  • Geoff Kirk, Rolls-Royce Chief Design Engineer for Civil Aerospace
  • Professor Stuart MacDonald, Head of the Aberdeen-based Gray’s School of Art
  • Bill Moggridge, co-founder of IDEO
  • Professor Jeremy Myerson, Director of Innovation RCA at the Royal College of Art
  • Bill Sermon, Vice President, Design at Nokia Multimedia
  • John Thackara, Director of Doors of Perception
  • Malcolm Wicks MP, UK Minister of State for Science and Innovation

Macdonald ends with serious critical reflections on the event that are worth a read and a thought.

Read full story [Mirrored in Business Week]

9 September 2006

Where to study experience design?

Experientia
Experience design has become a hot industry theme. Companies are looking to hire experience designers. New consultancies devoted to experience design are being founded nearly every day. Major industry players like Apple, Microsoft, Nokia and Philips are increasingly putting the user experience or experience design at the heart of their innovation strategy. And experience design is now also making inroads into other fields such as education, healthcare and tourism, to just name a few.

But where can you study it?

The short answer is that you can’t really study experience design. To my knowledge there is only one small programme of experience design at the Design Academy Eindhoven in the Netherlands.

An alternative is to go to a design school with a strong user-centred and experience design focus such as the one at Stanford or at IIT, both in the US.

One can also study interaction design, a field that does not always have the same user focus as experience design, and there are programmes now in many countries, including Australia (University of Melbourne, University of Queensland), Canada (Simon Fraser University), Denmark (Copenhagen Institute of Interaction Design), Ireland (University of Limerick), Japan (Keio University, University of Tokyo), Sweden (Chalmers, Malmo, Umea), UK (City University London, Middlesex University, RCA, University of Dundee), and the USA (Art Center College of Design, Carnegie Mellon, Indiana University, ITP, Parsons, Savannah College of Art and Design, University of Baltimore, University of Maryland).
[This is just a provisional list – see here, here and here for more discussion on interaction design education]

Other related fields are communication design, HCI and information design, or you can join a programme in what in Europe is sometimes called “new media” or “multimedia”.

Amsterdam also host the European Centre for the Experience Economy.

Bob Jacobson, the entrepreneur and visionary thinker behind the Total Experience weblog, just raised the issue in an email he sent to a selected group of people including Bill Moggridge, John Thackara, Donald Norman and some 26 others, where he underlines the need for an Experience Design Institute, as a place of study and research, as a site of serious reflection and discourse. I think his call is most appropriate and timely (if not overdue), and as per usual with Bob, well thought through. Why have I received 625 email newsgroup messages in the last four months mentioning “experience design” and there is only one study programme explicitly dealing with this?

The challenge is out there. Who is taking it on?

UPDATE: 12 September 2006

Apparently, some institutions are taking on the challenge and preparing experience design programmes or labs. Interestingly, they are not in the U.S. The Utrecht School of Arts (The Netherlands) is in the planning phases of a new bachelor course called Ambient Experience Design. Also the Belgian Media & Design Academy is setting up an Experience Design Lab (disclosure: I am working with them helping them in this process). I hear some interesting things coming out of Portugal, but I am still inquiring to find out more. The most developed for now seems to be the “design para a experiência” initiative of the Nomads center at the University of San Paolo, under the leadership of Marcelo Tramontano.

3 August 2006

PICNIC 2008

Experientia/Putting People First is a media partner of PICNIC 2008. Set up as a series of events – a top-class conference, seminars and workshops – PICNIC will be held in Amsterdam from 24 to 26 September this year, and will attract thousands of creative minds from all over the world.

Speakers

PICNIC brings together and disseminates the ideas and knowledge of the world’s best creators and innovators, including the following speakers: Stefan Agamanolis (scientist and developer); Genevieve Bell (anthropologist, Intel); Pim Betist (music lover and entrepreneur); Ben Cerveny (director, Playground Foundation); Matt Costello (writer and games developer); Esther Dyson (investor); Jyri Engeström (founder, Jaiku); Addy Feuerstein (founder, All of me); Eileen Gittins (founder, Blurb); Bruno Giussani (writer, commentator, entrepreneur); Adam Greenfield (futurist, Nokia); Rafi Haladjian (co-founder, Violet); Matt Hanson (movie maker); Laurent Haug (LIFT); Jeff Jarvis (media analyst, blogger); Michael B. Johnson (Pixar); Matt Jones (co-founder, Dopplr); Younghee Jung (senior design manager, Nokia); Ben Kaufman (founder, BKMedia, Mophie, Kluster); Aaron Koblin (artist, designer, researcher); Charles Leadbeater (advisor and author); Loic Le Meur (entrepreneur); Stefano Marzano (CEO, Philips Design); Bill Moggridge (founder, IDEO); Claus Nehmzow (general manager, Method); Madan Rao (consultant and writer); Martin de Ronde (director, OneBigGame); Ton Roosendaal (chairman, Blender Foundation); Philip Rosedale (founder, Linden Lab); Ken Rutkowski (KenRadio Broadcasting); Justus Schneider (marketeer); Clay Shirky (author); Eskil Steenberg (game designer); Linda Stone (writer, speaker, consultant); Kara Swisher (co-executive editor, AllThingsDigital); Itay Talgam (conductor); Michael Tchong (Ubercool); Peter Thaler (artist, entrepreneur); Vital Verlic (co-founder, OpenAd); Werner Vogels (CTO, Amazon); Kevin Wall (CEO, Control Room); and Ethan Zuckerman (blogger).

PICNIC Themes

The main theme of PICNIC’08 is “Collaborative Creativity” in its many guises. The organisers will look at new and connected forms of intelligence and creativity, from the fields of entertainment, science, the arts and business. From the global brain to crowd-sourced design, from data visualization techniques to fostering creativity; from connected cities to connected souls: in a series of ground-breaking presentations, discussions and debates PICNIC will explore the future of collaborative creativity and its implications for us all.

Below some of the themes the PICNIC’08 Conference will explore:

  • The Global Mind What happens if everyone is connected to everyone, all the time? PICNIC explores collaborative creative processes that involve large groups of people.
  • The Tupperware Economy Friends’ referrals are at the heart of new ‘advertising’ programmes. Social networks are commercial ventures that interlink communication and commerce in new ways.
  • Almost Real Advances in technology are also connecting us in new ways. From 3D cinema, to life video interactions and from 4K video to distributed opera, PICNIC explores reality in its new digital guise.
  • Future Urban Spaces Cities are experiments in new social forms, based on real-time information and feedback. How can we develop sustainable cities?
  • Creative Leadership How can leaders orchestrate creativity and innovation in an age of collaboration?
  • Domination of Infotainment Today more than ever, we can follow events as they unfold. The adrenaline of live reporting, turns news in to a game.

Media partnership with Putting People First

In the months leading up to the event, Putting People First, will feature several interviews with the speakers, including some exclusive ones. During the event we will also cover the event live.

Last updated: 24 May 2008

25 October 2005

Motofuture, Motorola’s vision of the future

Motofuture
Motofuture is a (broadband optimised) site where Motorola presents its vision of the future. Through a series of of people-based future scenarios the company introduces its prototypes of products and services.

The site was design by Digit and features a certain Bill Hammond, a retired man from Yorkshire, who looks an awful lot like Bill Moggridge, the co-founder of IDEO.