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Putting People First

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Search results for 'merholz'
18 September 2007

Principles and practices for successful experience design

Principles and practices for successful experience design
Peter Merholz presents in this presentation a selection of principles and practices that Adaptive Path uses to deliver great experience design work.

The very lengthy presentation (there are two slides on each of the 124 pdf pages) is organised in two parts. The first one looks at research topics, such as stakeholder interviews, in-depth case studies, user research, field research, defining the information architecture, content analysis, whereas the second part is an overview of all the various aspects of interaction design.

Download presentation (pdf, 12.7 mb, 124 pages)

4 September 2007

People regularly featured on this blog

In alphabetical order:

A
Marko Ahtisaari
Ken Anderson

B
Nik Baerten
Genevieve Bell
Chris Bernard
Tim Berners-Lee
Ralf Beuker
Nina Boesch
Danah Boyd
Stefana Broadbent
Tyler Brûlé
Bill Buxton

C
Jan Chipchase
Hilary Cottam
Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi
Alistair Curtis

D
Uday Dandavate
Liz Danzico
Regine Debatty
Paul Dourish

E
Jyri Engeström
Richard Eisermann

G
Jesse James Garrett
Fabien Girardin
Anand Giridharadas
Bruno Giussani
Adam Greenfield

H
Laurent Haug

I
Mizuko Ito

J
Bob Jacobson
Matt Jones

K
Jonathan Kestenbaum
Anne Kirah
Dirk Knemeyer
Jon Kolko
Mike Kuniavsky

L
Loïc Lemeur
Dan Lockton
Victor Lombardi

M
Nico Macdonald
John Maeda
Ranjit Makkuni
Ezio Manzini
Roger Martin
Stefano Marzano
Simona Maschi
Bruce Mau
Grant McCracken
Jess McMullin
Peter Merholz
Crysta Metcalf
Bill Moggridge
Peter Morville
Ulla-Maaria Mutanen

N
Jakob Nielsen
Donald Norman
Nicolas Nova
Bruce Nussbaum

P
Steve Portigal

R
Carlo Ratti
Howard Rheingold
Louis Rosenfeld
Stephen Rustow

S
Dan Saffer
Nathan Shedroff
Jared Spool
Yaniv Steiner
Bruce Sterling

T
John Thackara

V
Marco van Hout
Rob van Kranenburg
Mark Vanderbeeken
Joannes Vandermeulen
Jeffrey Veen
Timo Veikkola
Michele Visciola
Eric von Hippel

W
Tricia Wang
Luke Wroblewski

Z
Paola Zini
Jan-Christoph Zoels

15 February 2007

Adaptive Path president takes aim at Jakob Nielsen

Jakob Nielsen
Peter Merholz, founder and president of the experience design consultancy Adaptive Path, thinks Jakob Nielsen is venturing into areas, such as ROI, he has no expertise in and harming the field of design with his “unsubstantiated crap”.

“[The] last straw is his latest essay, where he claims ‘In one example, a state agency could get an ROI of 22,000% by fixing a basic usability problem.’ If he hadn’t jumped the shark before, he really has now. He backs this outrageous claim with a remarkably naive cost-benefit analysis, the kind of financial fiddling that no serious finance director within any organization would believe. [...]

“I wouldn’t write about it except that I fear that Jakob is turning into a pernicious force when it comes to advancing the field of design, because his reach means tens of thousands of people are reading this unsubstantiated crap. Such outrageous claims truly feel like the wild flailings of increasing irrelevance.

8 years ago, the web had two usability prophets – Jakob and Jared. Had you asked me to place bets on which one was worthier to follow, I would have said Jakob (UIE’s “Web Site Usability” book pissed me off). But in the last 4 or 5 years, Jakob has receded to the point of almost total irrelevance, whereas Jared and his gang are pursuing important and interesting questions, and never making specious claims about what they’ve found.”

Read full post

7 February 2007

Brands are inside-out, user experience is outside-in

Experience
“If branding is all about imprinting a pre-conceived idea and marketing profile onto an audience, thus being very inside-out, what is the value and role of experience design and how does it differ from traditional branding?”, asks Luigi Canali De Rossi on Robin Good.

“Taking pretext from content published online by the UK Design Council, Peter Merholz, one of user-experience most authoritative professionals takes a clarification stand on the key differences between branding and experience design.

Though difficult to grasp at first, experience design is more about the kind of experience users actually have than about controlling the experience you try to give them.”

Read full post

31 December 2006

UK Design Council on user-centred design and experience design

Design Council
The re-designed website of the UK Design Council features a series of new sections, including some on user-centred design and experience design.

User-centred design
The central premise of user-centred design is that the best-designed products and services result from understanding the needs of the people who will use them. User-centred designers engage actively with end-users to gather insights that drive design from the earliest stages of product and service development, right through the design process. Psychologist Alison Black gives an insight into how a user-centred approach can lead to innovative products and services that deliver real consumer benefit.

Experience design
Experience design concentrates on moments of engagement between people and brands, and the memories these moments create. For customers, all these moments of corporate experience combine to shape perceptions, motivate their brand commitment and influence the likelihood of repurchase in the future. Brand experience has the power to engender a greater degree of empathy, trust and loyalty from both customers and employees. Ralph Ardill of the Brand Experience Consultancy gives an overview of how experience design delivers new insights into how brands are perceived.
 
Unfortunately the experience design section is strongly brand-focused and therefore company-centric, rather than people-centric, and the write-up is seriously criticised by Peter Merholz, president of Adaptive Path, in a reaction to this post entitled “Experience design is not about brands“: “For ‘experience design’ to truly succeed as a discipline, it will need to distinguish itself from brand strategy and design, and demonstrate its distinct value as a contributor to business. Unfortunately, the Design Councils attempt at definition simply muddles things further.

Other sections that caught my eye:

  • Roger Coleman explains how inclusive design ensures that goods, services and environments are accessible to more people.
  • The ability of trends research to generate vital insights into customers’ and users’ future needs is making the practice increasingly important for all sectors. Trends expert James Woudhuysen explores the issues
  • The UK services sector is growing, but service design and its management are often poorly planned, argues Bill Hollins. This article reveals how companies can gain competitive advantage by applying design techniques when creating and improving their services.
  • Interaction design is the key skill used in creating an interface through which information technology can be manipulated, writes Nico Macdonald. As products and services are increasingly being created using information technology, interaction design is likely to become the key design skill of this century.
13 September 2006

IDEA 2006 conference on designing complex information spaces

IDEA 2006
Peter Merholz of Adaptive Path and president of the Information Architecture Institute asked me if I could mention the IA Institute’s IDEA 2006 conference on Putting People First, especially since the discounted registration ends Friday. Of course I gladly comply.

IDEA stands for Information: Design, Experience, Access and is a conference on designing complex information spaces of all kinds.

The IDEA 2006 conference, which takes place on 23 and 24 October at the Seattle Public Library, addresses issues of design for an always-on, always-connected world. Where “cyberspace” is a meaningless term because the online and offline worlds cannot be made distinct. Where physical spaces are so complex that detailed wayfinding is necessary to navigate them. Where work processes have become so involved, and so digitized, that we need new processes to manage those processes.

This conference brings together a diverse set of designers, creators, and researchers who are addressing these challenges head on. Speakers from a variety of backgrounds — including museum design, information visualization, librarians, environmental design, user research, engineering, interaction design, and product strategy — will discuss designing complex information spaces in the physical and virtual worlds.

The final programme features these speakers: Bruce Sterling; Linda Stone; Jake Barton (from Local Projects); Dave Cronin (from Cooper); David Guiney (from the National Park Service); Deborah Jacobs (the City Librarian for Seattle); Ed Vielmetti; Alison Sant; Ian White (from Urban Mapping); Mike Migurski (from Stamen); Fernanda Viegas (from IBM Research); Robert Kalin (from Etsy); Dan Hill (from the BBC); and Paul Gould (from MAYA Design).

12 January 2006

An anthropologist at an architecture firm

Mkthink
I have always been convinced that the traditional research approach as applied in architectural practices is conceptually closer to user experience research than that found in most other contexts.

Peter Merholz just alerted me to MKThink, an architecture firm which apparently has a resident anthropologist, who is getting the firm to move beyond standard architectural practice and to consider ethnography as a method toward constructing better built environments.

MKThink describes itself as the ideas company for the built environment which has a core strength in optimising the potential of the physical environment to serve human goals and aspirations.

7 November 2005

User interfaces for physical spaces

Maya_carnegie
A couple of months ago I posted about a very exciting experience design case study by Marc Rettig and MAYA Design on work done for the Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh.

On Monday 12 December the Information Architecture Institute organises a workshop entitled “User Interfaces for Physical Spaces“, where you can learn all about how, in “working with the Carnegie Library to understand how digital, physical, and human aspects of the library converge, MAYA developed an information architecture that gives the library a framework not only for a single renovated space, but also for system-wide organisational change and ongoing evolution.”

Read all about the event

(Thanks, Peter Merholz, for pointing this out to me).