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Putting People First

Daily insights on user experience, experience design and people-centred innovation
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Search results for 'garrett'
15 January 2007

Customer-centered experience design: creating loyalty in an experience economy

TechLinks
Cord Woodruff, director of human factors engineering at Definition 6, an Atlanta, Georgia-based eBusiness and IT consultancy, has published a long and in-depth article (part 1, 2, 3, 4) on customer-centered experience design on TechLinks, a web platform for the Georgia technology industry.

Or so I thought.

Until Jesse James Garrett, president of Adaptive Path, pointed me to the original article “Customer Loyalty and the Elements of User Experience” (pdf, 332 kb, 6 pages), published last winter in the Design Management Review, and obviously substantially plagiarised by Woodruff.

Such practices are not only unethical, but also extremely counterproductive, as it doesn’t take much for the truth to appear. After all, what happens in Atlanta, GA quickly reaches San Francisco, CA, via Torino, Italy if need be.

31 October 2006

The impact of Ajax on user experience

Ajax
Cindy Lu of HFE Consulting, a New Jersey-based user experience consultancy, just published an article on the impact of Ajax-based web applications on user experience.

While this first article of the two-part series looks at the positive impacts of Ajax on the user experience, an upcoming second article will address some of the problems.

“Ajax has been a hot topic since Jesse James Garrett coined the term and published the essay ‘Ajax: A New Approach to Web Applications‘ in February, 2005. Numerous Ajax-based web applications and development toolkits have been rushing to the internet in the past year. Web-based applications have become richer and more responsive, not only closing the gap with the desktop but also presenting new and fun ways for user-web interactions.”

“According to SitePoint and Ektron’s survey of 5,000 Web Developers ‘The State of Web Development 2006/2007‘, 46 percent of respondents said they will tap the AJAX model for a project in the next 12 months. Gartner estimates that by 2010, at least 60% of new application development projects will include the Rich Internet Applications (RIA) technology.

“If you are user experience designers (UXDs), usability practitioners or user interface developers, you should follow this new technology trend closely because Ajax is all about improving user experience. This article provides a brief overview of Ajax, the impact of Ajax-based web applications on user experience and recommends some strategies for being part of the technology wave.”

(The article has been published on the website of Apogee Usability Asia Ltd, a company based in Hong Kong, China which positions itself as “Asia’s leading usability research & consulting services provider”)

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8 October 2006

Video material on experience design

Video
This blog has one major defect: it is focused on text-based resources. Some searching on YouTube, Yahoo! Video and Google Video resulted in quite a lot of relevant video material. Here is a what I found:

I am only scratching the surface here. Frankly, we need a blog to catalogue experience design related materials on the web. I don’t have the time to do it. Anyone interested?

25 July 2006

Brand experience in user experience design [UX Matters]

Bang & Olufsen web site
This article by Steve Baty attempts to identify the appropriate role for brand values as one project objective within the broader framework of user-centered design.

If two organizations that provide similar services or products to similar markets both applied a typical user-centered design process, one might logically conclude that they would develop similar Web sites. User research during the early stages of both projects would uncover similar goals and objectives for the target audience—which is the same for both Web sites—and, in turn, would lead to similar results.

Frameworks such as Jesse James Garrett’s “Elements of User Experience” provide a rich structure for practitioners approaching a user experience project, but do little to identify or promote the role of brand during either the definition or design phases of a project. Similarly, process diagrams such as “Designing the User Experience” from the UPA—the “snakes and ladders” poster—focus on the importance of deliverables such as user profiles, task analyses, and usage scenarios portraying user interfaces in ways that do not jeopardize brand perception. Instead, we should consider how the visual design, the interaction design, the information architecture—in fact, the entire user experience—can positively contribute to brand image. By creating a user experience that is appropriate to our audience, business goals, and the competitive landscape, we can positively reinforce our customers’ brand experience.

Read full article