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Putting People First

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Search results for 'buxton'
4 September 2007

People regularly featured on this blog

In alphabetical order:

A
Marko Ahtisaari
Ken Anderson

B
Nik Baerten
Genevieve Bell
Chris Bernard
Tim Berners-Lee
Ralf Beuker
Nina Boesch
Danah Boyd
Stefana Broadbent
Tyler Brûlé
Bill Buxton

C
Jan Chipchase
Hilary Cottam
Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi
Alistair Curtis

D
Uday Dandavate
Liz Danzico
Regine Debatty
Paul Dourish

E
Jyri Engeström
Richard Eisermann

G
Jesse James Garrett
Fabien Girardin
Anand Giridharadas
Bruno Giussani
Adam Greenfield

H
Laurent Haug

I
Mizuko Ito

J
Bob Jacobson
Matt Jones

K
Jonathan Kestenbaum
Anne Kirah
Dirk Knemeyer
Jon Kolko
Mike Kuniavsky

L
Loïc Lemeur
Dan Lockton
Victor Lombardi

M
Nico Macdonald
John Maeda
Ranjit Makkuni
Ezio Manzini
Roger Martin
Stefano Marzano
Simona Maschi
Bruce Mau
Grant McCracken
Jess McMullin
Peter Merholz
Crysta Metcalf
Bill Moggridge
Peter Morville
Ulla-Maaria Mutanen

N
Jakob Nielsen
Donald Norman
Nicolas Nova
Bruce Nussbaum

P
Steve Portigal

R
Carlo Ratti
Howard Rheingold
Louis Rosenfeld
Stephen Rustow

S
Dan Saffer
Nathan Shedroff
Jared Spool
Yaniv Steiner
Bruce Sterling

T
John Thackara

V
Marco van Hout
Rob van Kranenburg
Mark Vanderbeeken
Joannes Vandermeulen
Jeffrey Veen
Timo Veikkola
Michele Visciola
Eric von Hippel

W
Tricia Wang
Luke Wroblewski

Z
Paola Zini
Jan-Christoph Zoels

14 June 2007

Daily reporting from the UPA annual conference (3)

Patterns
Yesterday the regular annual conference of the Usability Professionals’ Association (UPA) started.

Jakob Biesterfeldt (User Interface Design, Germany) and Robert Gillham (Amberlight, UK) continue their reporting from Austin, Texas:

‘The conference started off with keynote speaker Bill Buxton from Microsoft Research. Trying to pinpoint the object of design, Bill stated that “we are deluding ourselves if we think that what we design are the things we sell. Instead, we must design the individual, social and cultural experience that they engender and the value and impact that they have.” When we design interactive products, we should not start with screenshots of any kind, but rather sketch out storyboards that illustrate the user experience. We should put great emphasis on the transition between the states that you would typically see on screenshots. Arrows as used in page flow diagrams should be much more elaborate, indicating the dynamics of transitions over time.

In the afternoon, Susan Dray and David Siegel reported from their experiences in intercultural usability studies and gave away some tips for overcoming cross-cultural challenges, something many American participants still seem to find scary – so our International Usability Partners network definitely does make sense.

The UPA is by the way planning to bring its annual conference to Europe within the next two or three years.’

Amberlight (UK) and User Interface Design (UID) are founding members of the International Usability Partners (IUP). The IUP are a network of independent usability companies who provide usability services worldwide, based on a common understanding of best-of-class quality and methodology.

On Thursday Jakob and Robert will present the paper “Guidelines for Successful Recruiting in International Usability Studies” exchanging experiences from numerous usability studies across borders, cultures and languages. Their ideas on successful recruiting in international usability studies are available here.

18 May 2007

Book: Sketching User Experiences

Sketching User Experiences
Sketching User Experiences
Getting the Design Right and the Right Design
Bill Buxton, Microsoft Research
Morgan Kaufmann Publishers
May 2007
Paperback – 400 pages

Excerpt from a book review by Jessie Scanlon in Business Week:

“While Buxton’s insights are geared towards companies making software or products that depend on software, the book is jargon-free, and most anyone in the business of creating products will learn from it.

“My belief is that one of the most significant reasons for the failure of organizations to develop new software products in-house is the absence of anything that a design professional would recognize as an explicit design process,” writes Buxton.

He argues for a holistic approach to experience-based design, showing how the weakness of software product development can be complemented by the strengths of traditional product design and vice versa. But mostly, he argues strongly for an explicit and distinct design process that’s integrated into the larger organization and supported by executive leadership. [...]

He argues that designers are uniquely trained to focus on the human side of product development, to consider the behaviors and experiences associated with or enabled by these new technologies. “To design a tool, we must understand the larger physical, social, and psychological context in which it will be used. And that’s something designers are trained to do,” he says.”

- Read full review
- Download book flyer (pdf, 539 kb, 2 pages)

19 February 2007

Advanced programme of CHI 2007 available

CHI 2007
The CHI 2007 organisers have published an “advanced programme” of the conference, which will take place 28 April – 3 May in San Jose, California.

Some highlights:

Opening plenary: “Reaching for the intuitive” by Bill MoggridgeBill will attempt to show how design thinking can harnesses intuitive mental processes, leveraging tacit knowledge as well as the explicit knowledge of logically expressed thoughts. He will give examples of how designers and design teams learn by doing, allowing the subconscious mind to inform intuitions that guide actions. Some of the examples will come from his experience as Cofounder of IDEO, and others will be taken from his recent book Designing Interactions (www.designinginteractions.com), in which he interviews forty influential designers who have shaped our interaction with digital technology.

Interactive session: “Who killed design?: addressing design through an interdisciplinary investigation” with Bill Moggridge (IDEO), Bill Buxton (Microsoft Research), Terry Winograd (Stanford University) and Meg Armstrong (Parsons The New School for Design)This interactive session brings together significant voices from a variety of ‘design-engaged’ disciplines to lead a discussion about the oft-used, but seldom agreed upon notion of ‘Design’. The primary goal of this session is to address ‘Design’ from a much wider variety of perspectives than could occur within any singular discipline. In doing so, the session intends to re-visit [the definitions of] “Design”, “Designer”, and “Designed”.

Closing Plenary: “The mobile as a post-industrial platform for socio-economic development” by Niti BhanThe internet is the foundation of the world wide web of humanity online. Today, there is no such facility on the cellphone platform comparable as yet to the great degree of usability and freedom of movement that browsing currently offers those of us in “broadband nations”.

At the same time there is a great digital divide – between the haves and the have nots. Many have tried with different degrees of success to bridge this chasm, because they all see the potential for growth that unleashing the flow of wealth to and from the bottom-most segments of socioeconomic and geopolitical strata, can effect real change in the standard of living for a great majority on our planet rather than just the fortunate few.The numbers of cellphones sold in the past two years alone in the unexpected markets of the bottom of the pyramid, that includes a surprising numbers of luxury or high end mobiles, far more than any market survey could have predicted even two years ago, is a clear signal of the shift in economic activity. Look at what is already happening now in Bangladesh – microfinance and cellphones; South Africa – banking the unbanked through their cellphones; Uganda – microentreprise using the cellphone and more.The challenge before us today is to ask “What if…?” in the best traditions of creativity and imagination and visualise a near future, within the constraints of existing or installed technology, that could bridge this digital divide and develop the applications and the foundation to provide connectivity, commerce and community on the mobile platform. What kind of difference could this make?”

19 February 2006

Vision through sound [Toronto Star]

Bill_buxton_2
Researcher Bill Buxton started his career as a musician in Toronto, but found his true calling mixing computer science with his passions for music and design.

Now at Microsoft Research, the human-computer interaction and computer graphics pioneer will collaborate with researchers in the company’s five global labs to bring his skills in designing for human experiences to diverse research projects.

Read full story

29 December 2005

PC or people – who’s the boss? [CNET News.com]

Bill_buxton
Even though the days when computer-human interaction revolved around the C: prompt are far behind us, one legacy from that era remains.

Despite sundry advances in operating systems over the intervening two decades, it’s still not entirely clear who’s the boss: the human operator or the PC.

For the folks who helped usher in the C:-prompt era, it’s a matter of high priority. That’s one reason why Microsoft’s research division just hired Bill Buxton, a designer and expert in human-machine interfaces.

Buxton will focus on software design issues that stem from the “society of devices” taking shape now. As more people begin to use mobile phones and PDAs (personal digital assistants) or cars and appliances with on-board computers, software makers have a whole new set of challenges not seen in PC software.

CNET News.com spoke to Buxton about the importance of getting design right in the emerging world of ubiquitous computing.

Read full interview