counter

Putting People First

Daily insights on user experience, experience design and people-centred innovation
Audience Business Culture Design Locations Media Methods Services Social Issues

Children


Disabled


Elderly


Gender


Teens


Advertising


Branding


Business


Innovation


Marketing


Mechatronics


Technology


Architecture


Art


Creativity


Culture


Identity


Mobility


Museum


Co-creation


Design


Experience design


Interaction design


Presence


Service design


Ubiquitous computing


Africa


Americas


Asia


Australia


Europe


Italy


Turin


Blogging


Book


Conference


Media


Mobile phone


Play


Virtual world


Ethnography


Foresight


Prototype


Scenarios


Usability


User experience


User research


Education


Financial services


Healthcare


Public services


Research


Tourism


Urban development


Communications


Digital divide


Emerging markets


Participation


Social change


Sustainability


Search results for 'montagna'
25 August 2007

A gorgeous cinematic introduction to Turin, Italy

Turin
Even for those who don’t understand Italian, this is quite a spectacular introduction to Turin (or “Torino”), Italy, and its surrounding region.

The videos are shot in gorgeous high definition quality by the Turin movie director Luciano De Simone and narrated by Carlo Massarini (who was also responsible for the highly entertaining videos in the excellent Turin Museum of the Mountains).

Eventually the site, which was produced for the Italian Ministry of Culture, will introduce a number of Italian cities but for now the only one online is Turin, the city where I live.

Structured in nine chapters, accessible via a horizontal menu on the bottom, the series includes:
– a general introduction to the city;
Piazza Carignano, which introduces some of the historic centre, Italy’s first parliament (Turin was Italy’s capital from 1861 to 1864), the Egyptian Museum, the role of the theatre in the city, Piedmont food, the Langhe region, and the culture of the “aperitivo” in Turin;
Turin and the movies, focused of course on the Mole Antonelliana, site of the cinema museum;
Turin from the Balôn to the Murazzi, which introduces various neighbourhoods such as the Balôn area where the city’s flea market takes place;
Lingotto, the former FIAT factory, now a mixed-use facility with a conference centre, a commercial centre, a museum, a hotel, and a cinema;
Italia ’61, one of the sites of the Olympic Winter Games of 2006;
From the Dora to the Docks, focused on the new uses given to old industrial buildings;
The heart of the city, introduced as a historic but lively centre;
Turin nightlife.

The interface is quite simple: the “+” sign gives you a larger image, “link utili” provides you with links to what you just saw, and “mobile” allows you to download the movie files.

The site is not at all interactive though: the only thing you can do is watch. Another concern I have is that the creators did not add (optional) English subtitles, which would have not been so difficult to do. Graphically, the meaning of the bar code design element is beyond me.

But it is beautiful. Enjoy.

11 December 2005

The experience of visiting the Museum of the Mountains

Museo_montagna
Today I visited Italy’s National Museum of the Mountains (“Museo Nazionale della Montagna”), which is located just a few minutes from my home on a hill overlooking the city of Turin.

In fact, the museum re-opened today after an extensive two-year renovation and the result is a great example of how to create a well-crafted user experience in a museum context. It is a must when you visit Turin.

The museum is located on top of one of the hills right next to the city centre, on a site which used to be occupied by a fortress and later on by a still functioning Capucine monastery.

You enter the circular building on the ground floor where a video of a theatrical mountaineer (subtitled in flawless English) introduces you to the overall scope of the exhibit. The actor, Giuseppe Cederna, is omnipresent in the exhibit and clarifies the topics of the various areas by directly using the exhibited artefacts.

The exhibition is organised in eight thematic areas, four on the first floor and four on the second, explaining in short the story of how the mountains are at once a delicate ecosystem, an area of age-old cultures, and for about a century also an area of leisure and sports, with skiing having becoming a genuinely popular winter sport just after the second world war.

The central part of the building allows for temporary exhibitions, and one of them is currently devoted to the story of the Canadian gold rush in the mountains around Klondike and the Chilkoot Pass at the end of the 19th Century.

In the end though, I was most impressed by how the museum gives you an emotional, vivid and visceral feeling of why people can feel such strong fascination and passion for the mountains.

This feeling of shared excitement is even more enhanced when you finish the “climb” of the building and head up to the third floor where on a newly constructed open air roof terrace you can admire a spectacular panorama of 400 km (270 miles) of Alps.

Do go on a clear day. And don’t worry about taking children. They will enjoy it as much as you do.