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Search results for 'mobilerevolutions'
26 November 2010

Digital U – a series on how social media is affecting social change

Digital U
Digital U (Youtube) is the the first television/web series to examine how the internet and social media is changing the world around us.

Digital U is an eight-part series that looks at transparency, crowdsourcing, privacy and security – with powerful examples that demonstrate how the internet is changing the way we live, work, play, consume and communicate.

The team, which includes Lisa Campbell Salazar of Mobile Revolutions (featured before on this blog), interviewed a range of digital strategists including Dorothy Engelman, Mitch Joel (president, Twist Image and author of “Six Pixels of Separation”), Ryan Taylor (goldsmith, The Fair Trade Jewellery Co.), Craig Heintzman (development associate, World Wide Web Foundation), Deanna Zandt (media technologist and author of “Share This!”), Ryan Coleman (facilitator & information designer), Donnie Claudino (marketing manager, TechSoup Canada), Meghan Warby (senior consultant, Argyle Comm.), Don Tapscott (chairman of nGenera Insight), Lisa Torjman (associate, SiG@MaRS), Beka Economopoulos (vice oresident, Fission Strategy), Sarah Prevette (founder & CEO, Sprouter), Jason Mogus (CEO, Communicopia), Sacha Chua (enterprise 2.0 consultant, IBM), Christopher Berry (group marketing science director, Critical Mass), Tamera Kremer (founder and chief strategist, Wildfire Strategic Marketing), Phillip Djwa (principal, Agentic Communications), Roz Lemieux (partner, Fission Strategy), Monica Hamburg (writer & social media evangelist), Marco Campana (online capacity, Ontario Council of Agencies Serving Immigrants), Samer Rabadi (senior campaign manager, Care2.com), Sam Dorman (technology strategist), and Will Pate (social media consultant and host of CommandN).

Episode 1 – Online Activism: An Overview
With social tools like Twitter and Facebook, and thousands of sites devoted to issues and causes –– like minded individuals are hooking up about everything – and it’s revolutionizing how activists organize. Individuals can organize large scale events with virtually no cost, to create awareness and engage others for their cause.

Episode 2 – Transparency: Tell No Lies
Controlling and spinning a message has driven public relations for decades. The motto has been– it’s better to conceal than to reveal. But the internet has allowed us to access any and all information surrounding institutions and government. Not only can individuals share and discuss products and policies, but concerned citizens can use accountability sites to report neighborhood problems.

Episode 3 – The Power of the Citizen: Politics 2.0
Social media has forever changed democracy. Citizens are now being engaged like never before, as a dialogue in now emerging between politician and voter. People can now actively participate in their society, as governments have begun giving them the opportunity to brainstorm ideas to create change initiatives in their communities. And this concept of active citizenship is only the beginning of this democracy make-over.

Episode 4 – The Power of the Consumers: Consumers Pumping Up the Volume
The power is back in the hands of the consumers. With networking sites, blogs and forums, customers can share their opinions on virtually any purchase. But the conversation isn’t just one ended, consumers have begun to demand a conversation with the companies themselves. The digital space has finally given consumers the power to stand up and be heard.

Episode 5 – Twitter and Micro-messaging
Twitter is the “hot” micro-messaging tool, and it’s bringing people together faster than we ever could have imagined. Events like Ho Ho Ho TO proved micro-messaging’s success and its capacity for social change. But micro-messaging doesn’t always need to connect people over serious issues. It has made creating events, and coming together virtually effortless. The world is flattening in not only a geographical way, but a social way too.

Episode 6 – Crowdsourcing: The Wisdom of the Masses
Crowdsourcing is all about taping into the power of your consumers, acknowledging that many customers interested in an organization or a company are also going to be extremely knowledgeable about your products. Crowdsourcing also gives companies the opportunity to test products before they hit the mass market. From designing their own t-shirts, to measuring craters on Mars for NASA, this ability to harness our collective talents all over the world is one of the most powerful tool to bring about social change.

Episode 7 – A Virtual Printing Press
Self-publishing has become easier then ever before, and simple tools like blogs, Youtube and Twitter, your message can reach the over 1.5 billion people online. Anyone can publish online and for free, which means that content is diverse, unique and frequently controversial. Citizen journalism has also taken to the internet, as everyday citizens take to the streets and have begun conducting their own interviews and asking their own questions that haven’t always been addressed by the mainstream media.

Episode 8 – A Loss of Privacy?
The internet has closed the geographical gap and put information right at our fingertips – but its also important for all users to remember that anything they put on the web, can be difficult to remove, and accessible by almost anyone. Any profile or account you create online can be searched by employers, potential spouses, friends, family and strangers – which not only puts your reputation at risk, but also your safety. As a user you need to be aware and beware of the digital crumbs you can leave behind.

> Press release

3 August 2010

Mobile youth activism around the world

Mobile activism
A couple of years ago I wrote about Mobile Revolutions, a blog about mobile phones, youth and social change by Lisa Campbell Salazar.

The blog also supported TakingITMobile, an international study on youth mobile communications that she completed as a part of her Master of Environmental Studies at Canada’s York University. And her key findings are well worth taking a look at:

The fastest spreading communications technology the world has seen yet, mobile phones are rapidly changing the face of youth activism globally. TakingITMobile is a community-based research study conducted in partnership with the social network TakingITGlobal that examines how youth leaders across the globe (Campbell Salazar surveyed twenty countries) use mobile communications to create social change within their local communities and internationally. Survey participants (n = 565) paint a picture of the diversity of mobile youth activism around the world.

It was found that the majority of youth reported using their mobile phones to generate Citizen Media to share their message globally, mobilize protests, fundraise, educate their peers and spread solidarity.

TakingITMobile participants were passionate about a number of global issues, including the Environment (39%), Human Rights (36%), Poverty (28%), Health (24%), Peace (23.8%), HIV/AIDS (22.4%) and Violence (11.6%). While the most common mobile feature was Voice Calls (75%), TakingITMobile participants used a variety of mobile phone features, including Text Messages (46%), Web Browsing (38%), Social Media (27%), News (26%) and Photography (22%).

It was also discovered that youth who own smart phones are more likely to use their phones for activism (81%) than youth who don’t (71%). As well, females are much less likely (70%) to use their phones for activism than males. Youth ages 25-29 show higher levels of activism (84%) than youth in their teens (67%), early 20s (75%) and 30s (75%). GDP per capita was an influencing factor on both monthly costs, monthly average number of minutes used, number of SMS used and internet data used.

Overall it was found that participants from countries with high GDP per capita received cheaper services, with the exception of very high income nations such as Canada and the United States.

A number of barriers were identified for mobile youth activists, including cost of services (32%) cost of mobile phones (10%) as well as network coverage (9%) were the biggest barriers to accessing mobile phones.

22 March 2009

Dotmocracy: crowdsourcing, mashups, and social change [eBook]

Dotmocracy
Dotmocracy: Crowdsourcing, Mashups, and Social Change
by Lisa Campbell
Free download

As San Francisco braces itself to be the first major American city to not have a daily newspaper, the canary has sung as the death of print looks eminent. But what new frontiers do new media really offer? Can media democracy be maintained through new forms of citizen media that are more interactive featuring user-generated content?

Now almost anyone can be a media maker, and the whole world is literally watching, recording and listening. The divide between the producer and consumer has begun to dissolve. Crowdsourcing means that news can be created from the people experiencing the situations directly. Instead of producing content in house, aggregated content is the new king, with a whole flood of users openly sharing their photography, writing, and art.

Due to this influx of citizen media content, consumers are increasingly reluctant to pay for corporate media content, including the news. Citizens are turning towards each other for their news, as they send everything from reports on violence in Gaza, to updates on local public transit through text messaging (sms), and blog about both local and global events. This eBook will explore everything from the commonalities between popular theatre in the slums of Rio and Open Source software; how raves and hip hop effect how we collect and visualize data; and how the participatory, open nature of new media technology have infected our world’s politics.

With citizens picking up cameras and mobile phones, and the old media slowly going bankrupt, there will be a critical disruption in our traditional media landscape. By capturing the essence of a new generation of new media technology, this eBook aims to sketch out these new technologies, and how they are transforming the media landscape as we know it.

Lisa Campbell serves as the Director of Communications for Youth Action Network and is finishing her Master of Environmental Studies at York University with a special focus on Youth, New Media and Social Change.

4 October 2008

Mobile Revolutions

Mobile revolutions
Mobile Revolutions is a great blog about mobile phones, youth and social change by Lisa Campbell, that I discovered via Mobile Active. What’s more, she has actually taken the time to write a lengthy, seriously researched and in-depth paper to dwell on the subjects that are dear to her (and important to us).

“In this paper I outline the transformative power of new media technologies in Latin American contexts as tools for social change, comparing examples of youth digital activism from both Costa Rican and Panamanian contexts. Focusing on two types of Social Media, both Social Networks and Mobile Communication are examined as tools for Central American youth activists. In my conclusion I summarize the effects of national media policies, the situation of the digital divide and its effect on media democracy. The powerful nature of Citizen Media illustrates how overcoming the digital divide can produce democratic access to the media and societies’ larger institutions for social change.”

You can read it in one go, or split out over four chapters: