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Search results for 'marzano'
27 October 2005

Philips Design CEO Stefano Marzano featured in Business Week

Stefano13337
The current issue of Business Week has devoted an extensive feature to Dr. Stefano Marzano, CEO and Creative Director of Philips Design.

“Marzano’s passion lies in humanising technology. His goal is to make homes and offices less cluttered with bulky gadgets, while still retaining a sense of logic and order. This tenet forms the basis for an ongoing Philips project called Ambient Intelligence, which sets out to create smart, interactive objects that are sensitive to people’s needs and can anticipate their behavior.” [...]

“In a bid to keep them in touch with what consumers want to use, rather than what simply looks cool, Marzano and his designers work closely with market researchers, psychologists, sociologists, philosophers, and anthropologists. It’s a concept Marzano has called High Design.”

Read full feature

(see also my older post with a speech by Marzano)

20 May 2008

Upcoming book on the “high end”

Future High Tide of High End
A few weeks ago we were contacted by Marco Bevolo of Philips Design who was looking for some advance feedback on the book he is writing together with co-authors Stefano Marzano (also Philips Design), Dr. Howard R. Moskowitz and Alex Gofman (president and vice-president of Moscowitz Jacobs Inc.). We were sent a galley copy for a first reaction.

The book, which has the tentative title “Future High Tide of High End” and will be published by Wharton School Publishing, provides a socio-cultural and people-centred understanding of the concept of luxury — more specifically prestige products for the masses (which they call “High End”) — with the aim of delivering insights and guidance for future business development in this sector.

Made possible by about seventy conversations, contributions and interviews with industry experts, thought leaders and opinion makers, the book is quite unique in its approach, and bound to become a must-read for anyone conceiving, developing and marketing higher-end consumer products and services.

A focus on the intersection of social trends, designer visions, and deep people understanding, allows the authors to propose a series of original insights, including a new, experience-based concept for the future of the industry, as well as a toolbox from which to create and understand new “High End” product and service offerings.

To understand what the soul of the High End is going to be in the near future, the authors also introduce an experimental method, the Rule Developing Experimentation (RDE) — with people having to evaluate pairs of future scenarios, with those data then statistically analysed to find out which underlying ideas are the real drivers. They then present the results of an original experimental study based on this method, that was conducted in four countries (US, UK, China and Italy) with more than 500 end-users, all from somewhat higher income brackets.

The book, which is currently in advanced editing (partly on the basis of our feedback), is bound to be published before the end of the year. The authors told us they will soon publish some more material on their website (such as an abstract, a table of contents, a sample chapter, etc.), so that also our readers can contribute their own insights and suggestions.

A small endnote is one of pride: this is the first public piece on the upcoming book. Marco said he would be happy if it came from his hometown (Torino, Italy) and so are we.

2 December 2007

Changing the change

Mole
Changing the change. Design Visions, Proposals and Tools is an international conference, chaired by Ezio Manzini (blog) of the Politecnico di Milano, on the role and results of design research in the transition towards sustainability. The conference will be held in Torino, Italy, 10 to 12 July 2008, in the framework of Torino World Design Capital, 2008.

Changing the Change seeks to make a significant contribution to a necessary transformation toward a sustainable future. It specifically intends to outline state-of-the-art of design research in terms of visions, proposals and tools with which design can actively and positively take part in the wider social learning process that will have to take place.

“It’s a design research conference with a focus more on results than on methodology” Manzini tells John Thackara, “with an emphasis on what design research can do for sustainability”

At the heart of the conference design researchers will present concrete and documentable research results. This will be complemented by invited keynote speaker’s presentations that will help paint a clearer picture of the common ground from which the conference will take off.

Changing the Change is organised by the Co-ordination of Italian Design Research Doctorates and has a broad International Advisory Committee: Roberto Bartholo (Federal University of Rio de Janeiro), Luigi Bistagnino (Politecnico di Torino), Luisa Collina (Politecnico di Milano), Rachel Cooper (University of Lancaster), Jorge Frascara (University of Alberta), Victor Margolin (University of Illinois at Chicago), Stefano Marzano (Philips Design), Fumi Masuda (Tokyo Zokei University), Bill Moggridge (IDEO), Mugendi M’Rithaa (Cape Peninsula University of Technology), Geetha Narayanan (Srishti School of Art, Design and Technology), Gunter Pauli (Zeri), Yrjö Sotamaa (University of Art and Design Helsinki), Lou Yongqi (Tongji University).

3 November 2007

Simplicity tomorrow

The Simplicity Event
Last week Experientia partner Mark Vanderbeeken attended the Philips Simplicity Event in London. It was a mixture of a vision presentation, a prototype exhibition, a networking event, and a marketing opportunity. The prototypes on show were conceptual designs for social care environments five years into the future. Developed by Philips Design, they represent the direction of the company’s thinking for future product development.

Everything was driven by a vision worded by Stefano Marzano, CEO of Philips Design, as follows: “There is no good design that is not based on the understanding of people”.

From the Philips press release:

“At the three-day event, Philips [showcased] to a select group of customers, business partners, healthcare professionals and public sector representatives its vision of how in five years the clever use of technology married with intuitive, personalized design can lead to unexpected approaches to caring for people’s well-being at home, in the hospital and on the move.

Philips approaches caring for people’s wellness from three perspectives – caring for guests, caring for families and caring for patients – a focus that reflects Philips drive and commitment to creating concepts and products that are designed around people. [...]

The theme at the 2007 Simplicity Event of “caring for people’s well-being” builds on ongoing societal trends that Philips has been tracking closely: populations are getting older, healthcare is increasingly consumer-driven and business travel is now more extensive and hectic. In light of these trends, Philips employed the creativity and expertise of anthropologists, sociologists, designers, engineers and business leaders to come up with design concepts that address these converging trends. The result: concepts that take a holistic approach to healthcare, in which health and wellbeing touch on all aspects of a person’s daily life. Focusing on relaxing, healing and providing enjoyment, design concepts at the show explore the role of simplicity in Philips three core businesses – healthcare, lighting and consumer lifestyle.”

Design concepts were demonstrated in “real-life” scenarios. One trend Philips is exploring is the growing prevalence for couples to start families later in life. In the “Celebrating Pregnancy” design concept, Philips showcased how through advanced technology and a creative approach to design, prospective parents can experience “the wonder of a view inside the womb”.

Ambient Healing Space“, offering patients the ability to make their hospital stay more comfortable while allowing hospital staff a method of involving patients in their own care and “Daylight“, a hotel scenario suggesting that travel to different time
zones can be refreshing rather than exhausting.

- Press release | Background information
- More information about the concept collection
- Press release: Philips introduces simplicity to the hotel experience
- Videos: Simplicity Event | The Making Of | Megawhat.TV coverage

Several other sites have written about the London event, including AV Review, Design Taxi, Engadget, Geeks Are Sexy, I4U News, Pocket Lint (Wellness concepts, Hospital concepts, Daylight window, and Megawhat live), Tech.co.uk, and Trusted Reviews (Part One, Part Two, Showcase)

Some older concepts can be seen on the Simplicity Event website.

4 September 2007

People regularly featured on this blog

In alphabetical order:

A
Marko Ahtisaari
Ken Anderson

B
Nik Baerten
Genevieve Bell
Chris Bernard
Tim Berners-Lee
Ralf Beuker
Nina Boesch
Danah Boyd
Stefana Broadbent
Tyler Brûlé
Bill Buxton

C
Jan Chipchase
Hilary Cottam
Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi
Alistair Curtis

D
Uday Dandavate
Liz Danzico
Regine Debatty
Paul Dourish

E
Jyri Engeström
Richard Eisermann

G
Jesse James Garrett
Fabien Girardin
Anand Giridharadas
Bruno Giussani
Adam Greenfield

H
Laurent Haug

I
Mizuko Ito

J
Bob Jacobson
Matt Jones

K
Jonathan Kestenbaum
Anne Kirah
Dirk Knemeyer
Jon Kolko
Mike Kuniavsky

L
Loïc Lemeur
Dan Lockton
Victor Lombardi

M
Nico Macdonald
John Maeda
Ranjit Makkuni
Ezio Manzini
Roger Martin
Stefano Marzano
Simona Maschi
Bruce Mau
Grant McCracken
Jess McMullin
Peter Merholz
Crysta Metcalf
Bill Moggridge
Peter Morville
Ulla-Maaria Mutanen

N
Jakob Nielsen
Donald Norman
Nicolas Nova
Bruce Nussbaum

P
Steve Portigal

R
Carlo Ratti
Howard Rheingold
Louis Rosenfeld
Stephen Rustow

S
Dan Saffer
Nathan Shedroff
Jared Spool
Yaniv Steiner
Bruce Sterling

T
John Thackara

V
Marco van Hout
Rob van Kranenburg
Mark Vanderbeeken
Joannes Vandermeulen
Jeffrey Veen
Timo Veikkola
Michele Visciola
Eric von Hippel

W
Tricia Wang
Luke Wroblewski

Z
Paola Zini
Jan-Christoph Zoels

11 October 2006

Philips Design magazine on foresighting techniques, health and ‘sensitive’ interactions

New Value by One Design
Philips today released the October issue of new value by One Design, its online quarterly design magazine.

As described in Stefano Marzano’s foreword, the issue is devoted to foresighting techniques, design concepts for a healthy lifestyle, and interactions that are responsive to subtle triggers like sensuality, affection and sensation.

In ‘Making sense of the future‘, the magazine explores how innovative foresighting research, and particularly Philips’ Compass Program, helps to provide the company with clues to the future to leverage new opportunities. Josephine Green, Senior Director, Trends & Strategy, New Solutions Development explains how they use a strategy of ‘putting people first’ (!): “People are very much at the center of the foresighting process [and this] offers us a much richer set of insights to drive innovation”.

The next step in simplicity is the title of an article on this year’s Simplicity Event in London (see also this post). The event addressed the issue of ‘A healthy lifestyle’ with the introduction of the Philips Design simplicity-led design concepts to help people become more aware of their own well-being. The article gives an overview of the thinking behind the concepts and the processes used to generate them.

A feature story addresses some of the subtlest, most sophisticated interactions: those that are ‘sensitive’ rather than intelligent and take place through a simple gesture, touch or glance. ‘You are what you wear‘ examines how Philips Design is exploring this issue in the SKIN Probe project. “We are experimenting with devices that are responsive to subtle triggers like sensuality, affection and sensation,” says Lucy McRae, Body Architect at Philips Design in Eindhoven, who is also interviewed in this issue.

Finally the magazine contains an interview with Harry Rich, Deputy Chief Executive of the UK Design Council on the value of design for business.

25 September 2006

Design intervention at Philips [Fast Company]

Philips' Ambilight TV
In a long, in-depth Fast Company feature article, Jennifer Rheingold tries to answer the question if Philips will “emerge as a shining example of an organization that fueled its renaissance with design, or as one that ultimately failed because it lost sight of its real objective?”. In the article she provides a detailed portrait of the Philips Design unit and its role within Philips in general.

“Mapping out just how it should function has fallen in large part to Andrea Ragnetti, Philips’s chief marketing officer, and Stefano Marzano, the longtime CEO and chief creative director of Philips Design, a freestanding unit with 450 staffers, a satchelful of prestigious awards, and an estimated annual budget of $250 million. Marzano has been tapped to unify the company through what it calls ‘simplicity-led design’. He wants to establish his design principles–the unity of form and function, ease of use, and, in Philips’s world, improving the consumer’s life–as an organizing framework for the entire company, from its corporate structure to the ways departments and executives communicate, right on up to the user interface on every electronic gizmo.” [...]

“Marzano’s attempt to overhaul Philips through design is not just some right-brain fantasia. There is a method here, one that draws together the data-driven old guard, the truest of blue-sky thinkers, and everyone in between. Marzano has devoted his career to exploring meta-trends in society and has put that experience at the center of product development at Philips. So, where a company of this scale would typically rely on designers or engineers to generate ideas in-house and then force them into the market, at Philips the process starts out as macrofocused as possible.”

“It starts, in other words, with a mandate not to develop the next iPod but to assess what, exactly, would change consumers’ lives for the better, whether a lightbulb or a music player. Drawing on broad, proprietary sociocultural research, the group– a small army of designers, social scientists, cultural experts, and assorted brainiacs–might identify, for example, an emerging baby boom, a global water shortage, or a growing desire to spend more time at home. It then distills its research into a series of “personas,” each representing a group with like-minded interests, needs, and values–on child rearing, maybe, or the ideal home. Only then do designers and engineers try to imagine and build a series of products such a composite person might want.” [...]

“Ragnetti established a new vetting process three years ago in which design, marketing, and technology evaluate each new product idea as a team at every stage of development–both to translate the big think for more-analytical types and to anchor that big think in reality.”

“Philips is also trying to better track the impact of design at the company. Now, design shares its broad-based research at every early meeting to ensure that each proposed product is backed up by a real “validated proposition,” in Philips jargon. This means it’s based not on a hypothesis about what people might desire but rather on hard research that shows what people actually desire. Since March, the company has been tracking the percentage of R&D funds spent on such propositions; products that are now “mission critical,” meaning one to two years from the market, must be tied to research or they will not go forward. And thousands of managers have had to be retrained to understand these new metrics.”

Read full story

3 August 2006

PICNIC 2008

Experientia/Putting People First is a media partner of PICNIC 2008. Set up as a series of events – a top-class conference, seminars and workshops – PICNIC will be held in Amsterdam from 24 to 26 September this year, and will attract thousands of creative minds from all over the world.

Speakers

PICNIC brings together and disseminates the ideas and knowledge of the world’s best creators and innovators, including the following speakers: Stefan Agamanolis (scientist and developer); Genevieve Bell (anthropologist, Intel); Pim Betist (music lover and entrepreneur); Ben Cerveny (director, Playground Foundation); Matt Costello (writer and games developer); Esther Dyson (investor); Jyri Engeström (founder, Jaiku); Addy Feuerstein (founder, All of me); Eileen Gittins (founder, Blurb); Bruno Giussani (writer, commentator, entrepreneur); Adam Greenfield (futurist, Nokia); Rafi Haladjian (co-founder, Violet); Matt Hanson (movie maker); Laurent Haug (LIFT); Jeff Jarvis (media analyst, blogger); Michael B. Johnson (Pixar); Matt Jones (co-founder, Dopplr); Younghee Jung (senior design manager, Nokia); Ben Kaufman (founder, BKMedia, Mophie, Kluster); Aaron Koblin (artist, designer, researcher); Charles Leadbeater (advisor and author); Loic Le Meur (entrepreneur); Stefano Marzano (CEO, Philips Design); Bill Moggridge (founder, IDEO); Claus Nehmzow (general manager, Method); Madan Rao (consultant and writer); Martin de Ronde (director, OneBigGame); Ton Roosendaal (chairman, Blender Foundation); Philip Rosedale (founder, Linden Lab); Ken Rutkowski (KenRadio Broadcasting); Justus Schneider (marketeer); Clay Shirky (author); Eskil Steenberg (game designer); Linda Stone (writer, speaker, consultant); Kara Swisher (co-executive editor, AllThingsDigital); Itay Talgam (conductor); Michael Tchong (Ubercool); Peter Thaler (artist, entrepreneur); Vital Verlic (co-founder, OpenAd); Werner Vogels (CTO, Amazon); Kevin Wall (CEO, Control Room); and Ethan Zuckerman (blogger).

PICNIC Themes

The main theme of PICNIC’08 is “Collaborative Creativity” in its many guises. The organisers will look at new and connected forms of intelligence and creativity, from the fields of entertainment, science, the arts and business. From the global brain to crowd-sourced design, from data visualization techniques to fostering creativity; from connected cities to connected souls: in a series of ground-breaking presentations, discussions and debates PICNIC will explore the future of collaborative creativity and its implications for us all.

Below some of the themes the PICNIC’08 Conference will explore:

  • The Global Mind What happens if everyone is connected to everyone, all the time? PICNIC explores collaborative creative processes that involve large groups of people.
  • The Tupperware Economy Friends’ referrals are at the heart of new ‘advertising’ programmes. Social networks are commercial ventures that interlink communication and commerce in new ways.
  • Almost Real Advances in technology are also connecting us in new ways. From 3D cinema, to life video interactions and from 4K video to distributed opera, PICNIC explores reality in its new digital guise.
  • Future Urban Spaces Cities are experiments in new social forms, based on real-time information and feedback. How can we develop sustainable cities?
  • Creative Leadership How can leaders orchestrate creativity and innovation in an age of collaboration?
  • Domination of Infotainment Today more than ever, we can follow events as they unfold. The adrenaline of live reporting, turns news in to a game.

Media partnership with Putting People First

In the months leading up to the event, Putting People First, will feature several interviews with the speakers, including some exclusive ones. During the event we will also cover the event live.

Last updated: 24 May 2008

19 April 2006

Philips design magazine on emerging markets, sustainability and innovation

New Value by One Design
Philips released today the April issue of new value by One Design, its online quarterly design magazine.

The current issue starts with an introductory article on designing for emerging markets by Stefano Marzano, CEO and chief creative director, and then continues with a report on a workshop to develop a vision on sustainable design, an article on Philips’ new approach to innovation and a story on user-centred lighting design

The magazine also includes interviews with Kris Ramachandran (Ram), ceo of Philips Electronics India Ltd. about designing for emerging markets, and with Anton Andrews of Philips Design about how the fear of handing over creative outcomes is outweighed by the inspiration and insight that can come from collaborative design and innovation.

31 March 2006

Philips shows product concepts designed with users [Reuters]

Philips Intuitive Connected Home
Dutch Philips Electronics on Wednesday unveiled innovative product ideas that emerged from its design laboratories in collaboration with consumers seeking friendlier high technology gadgets.

Elements of these concepts could appear in products on store shelves as early as this year, Europe’s top consumer electronics group said.

The ideas, all based on available technology, are aimed at making gadgets easier to use and share among various types of users. [...]

"The user experience is now the driving force behind our  design development process," said Andrews, creative director of Philips’ Intuitive Connected Home design research project.

Rather than approaching consumers at the very end of the design process to test concept products, Philips’ Intuitive Connected Home project tracks consumers’ habits, shows them ideas for an application, seeks further comment online and shows real prototypes even before the products are tested.

Tests are designed to see if consumers understand a  product, know how to use it and recognize the value.

"The result is an experience prototype," Andrews said. "It’s not the same as a design model which looks nice but is impossible to produce, and its not the same a technical prototype which works well but is a block of technology with wires protruding from all sides." [...]

"The value of a product is no longer created in the factories, but at the point of interaction with the consumer. So we need to have a clear understanding of consumer values," said Philips design chief Stefano Marzano.

"This is the reason why design is now seen as a core strategic way. Design is a strategy for companies eager to generate qualities rather than (products)," he added.

Read full story

21 January 2006

Philips Design CEO on people as a source of breakthrough innovation

Stefano13337
DMI, the Design Management Institute, has just released a free pdf download of a Spring 2005 article by Stefano Marzano, CEO of Philips Design, entitled “People as a Source of Breakthrough Innovation”.

“The product visions are startling—jackets with cell phones and MP3 players, multimedia furniture, a radiography department where patients design the scanning experience. With these and other examples, Stefano Marzano articulates Philips Design’s human-centered techniques for exploring the frontiers of creativity—strategies that blend an in-depth understanding of markets, the firm’s special competencies, and the interface with customers.”

Marzano is also the keynote speaker at the 10th European international conference on design management, taking place in Amsterdam, March 29-31. Other speakers include Christoph Böninger of designafairs Europe and the brilliant mobility design strategist Raymond Turner.

Download pdf (204 kb, 8 pages)

11 January 2006

Philips design magazine provides vision for simplicity

Next_simplicity
Philips released today the January issue of new value by One Design, its online quarterly design magazine.

The current issue starts with an introductory article by Stefano Marzano, CEO and chief creative director, and then continues with an overview of the Philips internal design awards, a report on the exploratory design project Next Simplicity and an interview with Rob Timmer of Philips Consumer Electronics who explains the importance of creating simple yet sophisticated user interfaces for the Connected Planet range of home entertainment products and the role design played in this.

The magazine also reports on Media Mediators, a design research project, jointly carried out with London’s Royal College of Art, that explored possibilities for really bringing digital products to life, examines in an interview with Marion Verbücken, Senior Innovation Design Consultant, how innovative concepts can best be visualised and communicated when the solution of simplicity is no longer to be found in what it is and how it looks but rather in what it does and how, and finally ends with a small case study on how Philips used a people-focused design approach to develop the Aroundio service concept and create and implement the entire Aroundio brand experience for the global security service provider, Securitas.

9 November 2004

Design, key factor for success [Philips]

Stefano13337
Speech by Dr. Stefano Marzano, CEO & Chief Creative Director of Philips Design at the German Marketing Association Conference in Hamburg.

Read the full speech