counter

Putting People First

Daily insights on user experience, experience design and people-centred innovation
Audience Business Culture Design Locations Media Methods Services Social Issues

Children


Disabled


Elderly


Gender


Teens


Advertising


Branding


Business


Innovation


Marketing


Mechatronics


Technology


Architecture


Art


Creativity


Culture


Identity


Mobility


Museum


Co-creation


Design


Experience design


Interaction design


Presence


Service design


Ubiquitous computing


Africa


Americas


Asia


Australia


Europe


Italy


Turin


Blogging


Book


Conference


Media


Mobile phone


Play


Virtual world


Ethnography


Foresight


Prototype


Scenarios


Usability


User experience


User research


Education


Financial services


Healthcare


Public services


Research


Tourism


Urban development


Communications


Digital divide


Emerging markets


Participation


Social change


Sustainability


Search results for 'chipchase'
16 April 2013

Book: Hidden in Plain Sight (by Jan Chipchase)

hiddeninplainsight

Hidden in Plain Sight: How to Create Extraordinary Products for Tomorrow’s Customers
by Jan Chipchase
Harper Collins Publishers
April 2013
256 pages
(Amazon link)

A global-innovation expert offers a new perspective on how consumers think and how to develop products and services that affect their everyday lives.

Who are your next customers—not just the ones you are serving today but the ones you’ll need three, five, or ten years from now? How do you figure out what goods and services will attract them in the future before your competitors do?

According to Jan Chipchase—whom Fast Company has called the “James Bond of design research” and Fortune has called the “Indiana Jones of technology for the developing world”—most of the clues are right in front of us. The key is learning to see the ordinary in a revolutionary new way. As the executive creative director of Global Insights at frog, an award-winning global design and innovation company, Chipchase draws on everyday objects and patterns to show us how to see the world differently, from making a phone call to filling up a gas tank to ascertaining whether it’s actually half-and-half you’re pouring into your coffee. Chipchase is always looking for opportunities—gaps, anomalies, and contradictions—that will give his clients, some of the world’s largest and most successful companies, a distinct competitive advantage, whether they’re delivering the most low-tech bar of soap or the most high-tech wireless network.

In Hidden in Plain Sight, Chipchase takes readers on his journeys around the globe and shares his methods for identifying the unmet needs of customers. No matter where he stops—whether Cleveland or Kabul—his goals are the same: to spot and decode the routines of daily life and to help readers use the very same tools that he and his team use to see, and capitalize upon, what is hidden in plain sight today to create businesses tomorrow.

Excerpt
Recent article by Jan Chipchase on Google Glass

13 January 2012

Jan Chipchase gets asked critical questions and responds

imperialist_tendencies

During the Pop!Tech conference, well known design researcher Jan Chipchase gave a talk about his research work. In the panel session an audience member asked two questions relating to personal motivations of doing this kind of research and whether anyone has the moral right to extract knowledge from a community for corporate gain:

– What is it like working for BigCorps pillaging the intellect of people around the world for commercial gain?
– How do you sleep at night as the corporations you work for pump their worthless products into the world?

Read his answer

12 January 2012

Tapping social networks for design research recruiting, by Jan Chipchase

janchipchase

Jan Chipchase thinks that 80 to 90% of current recruiting for design research/ethnographic studies (excluding focus groups) that is currently placed through recruiting agencies could from a skill and work-flow perspective, be carried out in-house through a clever use of social networks.

“For researchers this means learning new skills: maintaining an online identity that is a suitable interface for potential recruits; knowing how to gauge reach through which social networking sites, running and iterating an ad-campaign; effectively screening and knowing how to turn leads into participants. Whilst it is relatively early days the effectiveness of the platform and the low barriers to entry will mean that the change will be rapid. You are the agents of this change.”

Read article

1 April 2010

Jan Chipchase (Nokia) guest blogging for CGAP

Ahmedabad
The title might be a bit cryptic for some readers, but Jan Chipchase is a well-known user researcher/anthropologist at Nokia. He spent a decade exploring the intersection of technology, people and culture for Nokia, and specializes in turning insights into opportunities.

CGAP is an independent policy and research center dedicated to advancing financial access for the world’s poor, housed at the World Bank.

His first post, which obviously deals with the topic of mobile banking in emerging markets, is just an introduction, but we will surely follow his contributions.

8 April 2009

Keynote at CHI by Nokia Research’s Chipchase examined cultural dimension of interaction design

Jan Chipchase at CHI
ACM reports that “a top researcher for Nokia Design [addressed] the need for effective cross-culture design research when developing informed and inspired designs for future mobile technologies. Jan Chipchase, who studies how people around the world behave, communicate, and interact with each other, [was] an invited speaker at ACM’s Computer-Human Interaction 2009 (CHI 2009) conference on April 6, at Boston’s Hynes Convention Center.

Chipchase notes that understanding both the similarities and differences between cultures often helps shape future ideas for mobile device development. “That is why my research focus is on detecting early signals of new trends within a culture and combining that knowledge with the understanding of where technology is heading,” he explains. Chipchase splits his time between running user studies and developing new applications, services and products that people are likely to be using 3 to 15 years from now.

CHI 2009 Design Chair Robert Fabricant noted that Chipchase was invited to address the cultural dimensions of interaction design because understanding the individual cultural impact of global technologies is essential for successful devices. “He has deep knowledge and experience observing world cultures and synthesizing his observations into key concepts a designer can apply when developing future technologies,” said Fabricant, who is Executive Creativity Director at frog design, inc.

The annual conference on Computer-Human Interaction is the premier worldwide forum for exchanging information on all aspects of how people interact with computers. CHI 2009 runs from April 4-9, at the Hynes Convention Center. It offers two days of pre-conference workshops and four days of dynamic sessions that explore the future of computer-human interaction with researchers, practitioners, educators and students.

On his own blog, Chipchase lists some of the materials he presented at CHI during his talk “Designing for the Global Impact of Mobile Devices”:

11 November 2008

Jan Chipchase on how he designs his research expeditions

Tiger.Blam
Last week frog design and IxDA NY organised Tiger.Blam, a public conversation with Nokia’s Jan Chipchase on effective design research in cross-cultural mobile markets, or in other words, how he ‘designs’ his research expeditions.

No video or presentation download is as yet available, but several bloggers have it summarised.

Robert Fabricant of frog design focuses on his personal favourites and is an especially interesting read. Christine Huang of PSFK found especially interesting the principles that guide him and his team members when they’re conducting research in the field. Drew Cogbill wrote a more general summary.

Required reading for those doing research in emerging markets.

9 November 2008

Nokia’s Jan Chipchase on nine trends in social interactions

Jan Chipchase
Videos of the September LIFT conference in Seoul, Korea are slowly being posted. The latest one is by Jan Chipchase, a well-known Nokia user researcher.

“He details the nine trends he thinks will shape the future of social interactions, trends he identified through the extensive field work he and his team are conducting around the world. Jan’s work shows how the digital devices are creating new practices and usages by becoming smaller and smaller, opening up a new design space for the mobile industry.”

Jan is not entirely happy with this video, as he thinks the talk is a draft, still a little rough around the edges.

- Watch video
Slides and presentation notes

12 April 2008

Chipchase featured in New York Times Magazine

Jan Chipchase
The Chipchase hype has hit the New York Times Magazine.

Nokia’s user anthropologist Jan Chipchase is becoming very popular. Just a day after the Economist, now one of the world’s top newspapers has published a 6,000 word feature on him, in its highly regarded Magazine of all places.

“Chipchase is 38, a rangy native of Britain whose broad forehead and high-slung brows combine to give him the air of someone who is quick to be amazed, which in his line of work is something of an asset. For the last seven years, he has worked for the Finnish cellphone company Nokia as a “human-behavior researcher.” He’s also sometimes referred to as a “user anthropologist.” To an outsider, the job can seem decidedly oblique. His mission, broadly defined, is to peer into the lives of other people, accumulating as much knowledge as possible about human behavior so that he can feed helpful bits of information back to the company — to the squads of designers and technologists and marketing people who may never have set foot in a Vietnamese barbershop but who would appreciate it greatly if that barber someday were to buy a Nokia.”

Jan, congratulations!

Read full story

11 April 2008

The Economist website features Jan Chipchase video

Digital Nomads
The Economist asked Nokia’s “user anthropologist” Jan Chipchase to self-document his nomadic life in Tokyo and Seattle, taking pictures and leaving phone messages.

The video is part of The Economist special report on mobility and “digital nomads”.

Watch video

2 February 2008

Jan Chipchase of Nokia on mobile phone sharing

Shared phone practices
Jan Chipchase, the well-known Nokia anthropologist, has just published a blog post, an executive summary, and a paper (ppt, 7 mb, 70 pages) that explores mobile phone sharing in emerging markets and how it works.
“Much of the growth in the telecommunications industry is coming from emerging markets – places like India and Africa and for many new consumers their first mobile phone experience is a shared one. This essay uses the term sharing in the sense of primary usage orientated around borrowing and lending rather than ‘let me show you the photos I took at last night’s party’. Mobile phone sharing is not just limited to personal use – from the streets of Cairo to Kampala kiosks are springing up with little more than a mobile phone and a sign advertising call rates. What happens when people share an object that is inherently designed for personal use? And based on how and why people share in what ways can devices and services be redesigned to optimise the shared user experiences? Indeed, should they be re-designed?”

3 December 2007

Jan Chipchase at TED conference

Jan Chipchase
The TED conference has published its video of the talk by Nokia’s “user anthropologist” Jan Chipchase in March this year:

Nokia principal researcher Jan Chipchase’s investigation into the ways we interact with technology has led him from the villages of Uganda to the insides of our pockets. Along the way, he’s made some unexpected discoveries: about the novel ways illiterate people interface with their cellphones, or the role the cellphone can sometimes play in commerce, or the deep emotional bonds we all seem to share with our phones.

Jan Chipchase can guess what’s inside your bag and knows all about the secret contents of your refrigerator. It isn’t a second sight or a carnival trick; he knows about the ways we think and act because he’s spent years studying our behavioral patterns. He’s traveled from country to country to learn everything he can about what makes us tick, from our relationship to our phones (hint: it’s deep, and it’s real) to where we stow our keys each night.

Jan’s discoveries and insights help inspire the development of the next generations of phones and services at Nokia. As he puts it, if he does his job right, you should be seeing the results of his research hitting the streets and airwaves within the next 3 to 15 years.

Watch video

25 August 2007

Jan Chipchase of Nokia on the challenges of human-centred design

A Path, Adapted
Jan Chipchase, principal researcher at Nokia Design, recently gave a talk at User Experience Week 2007, an event organised by Adaptive Path. His summary:

That as human centered design practitioners we talk about, well, putting humans at the center of the design process. Which is all fine and dandy except that in the context of designing our ubiquitiously connected and oh-so-smart future this roughly equates to understanding the sum of all human experiences, which is clearly impossible. The joy of aiming high and failing. Or not?

That the path to a good project can start with the simplest of questions. Who are you? How can you prove it? What do you carry? Why did you do that thing you did?

That the deep pockets of a corporate research lab/design studio and buy-in from upper management make for a well resourced project, but that ultimately all it takes to get started is an inquisitive mind and a bit of positive attitude. Point in case? – the years of illiteracy research which I’ve written about previously and which is ongoing in the research lab started out as a three week scoping project with no travel budget, relied on the voluntary assistance of a friendly India based subcontractor who gave up her weekend to collect data on our behalf. The resulting report showed sufficient promise to warrant further (better resourced) investigation. And the subcontractor? Ah, she earned her place on the team in studies from Cairo to Tehran, most recently in Dharavi, Mumbai. Looking for experience? Willing to work for peanuts? Of course you are.

And that you’d be surprised at the internal credibility that comes from external reporting of the design research. By this I don’t mean peer reviewed navel gazing or at the other extreme, lite fluff pieces. But simply that when your research is what they see when they open their favourite press, in their mind’s eye you’ve arrived. For now at least a virtuous circle.”

Download presentation (PowerPoint, 4.3 mb, slides)

28 May 2007

BBC News speaks to Jan Chipchase of Nokia Design

Phone straps
BBC News has just published a feature on Jan Chipchase, principal researcher at Nokia Design and frequently featured on this blog.

“Jan Chipchase tours the world looking at how people use mobile phones in their everyday lives and, more broadly, how people live.

Mr Chipchase’s focus is on the uses to which people put their phones; where they keep them, how they answer them, and a million other details about our relationships with these devices that have helped shape our world.

On the street, in homes, in the office, in pockets, handbags, at the marketplace, and in the community – Mr Chipchase tries to put mobile phone use into the context of the culture and landscape he is in.”

Read full story

15 May 2007

The Times profiles Nokia user researcher Jan Chipchase

Jan Chipchase
“I’ve got a fair idea of what you’re carrying in your pockets,” Jan Chipchase says, somewhat ominously. “I spend a lot of time rooting around in people’s bags. And fridges.”

So goes the opening gambit of a self-described “professional, authorised stalker”. Employed by Nokia, the largest mobile phone maker, he tracks human behaviour around the world to help to design the phones of the future.

A trove of mobile trivia, Mr Chipchase (actual job title: principal researcher) knows, first-hand, that burkha-wearing students in Iran cheat in exams using hidden Bluetooth headsets; that 50 per cent of the world’s women keep their phones in their handbags (and miss 30 per cent of their calls); and that most Asian early adopters who watch mobile TV ignore the mobile part and tune in from home.

In the past year, he has left his Tokyo base to visit 15 countries. He has studied the behaviour of mobile-phone owners from the shanty towns of Soweto to the bedrooms of Seoul’s painfully tech-savvy teens, trying to work out what handsets will look like 15 years from now.

Read full story

18 March 2007

The Jan Chipchase controversy: corporate ethnography is “primitive”

Nokia Village Phone research in Uganda
Last week Business Week published an interview with Jan Chipchase, user anthropologist at Nokia Design (and frequently featured on this blog). It didn’t go down very well with Bob Jacobson:

Nokia’s ethnographic research sounds basic, even primitive. It’s akin to Dr. Livingston in “Darkest Africa,” sussing out the “natives”: how many yams they eat in a week, who tells the iconic stories, what clans do to maintain hegemony, etc. Very ho-hum, except that the technology is “cool.” Cellphone ethnographic research, so far as I can tell, studies behaviors related to product use but as the snippet in BW reveals, not the inner workings of cellphone users — how they relate to cellphones in phenomenological ways, for example.

This quote comes from a post on the anthrodesign Yahoo! group which immediately provoked reactions. It is still going on.

Tyler of Sprint Nextel supports Chipchase but arguest that “we need a comprehensive theory of design that works for anthropology (or human research for commerce)”, whereas Sridhar Dhulipala points to a report in the Times of India, Bangalore, on the usage of mobile phones. Whereas the Nokia report strikes as typical corporate leadership behaviour, Dhulipala thinks that this other story provides a contrasting insight.

Christina Bolas, an anthropologist at Sprint Nextel, was recently involved in “true ethnography of cell phone use” beyond the basic “needs assessment” or “behaviors related to product use”, but her main difficulty was “getting the results heard and supported by the pile of people needed to make real change in the industry”. She concludes: “Not only do we need a comprehensive theory of design that works for anthropology, but we also need a theory that takes into account the inevitable world of corporate politics within which that theory must live.”

Finally, Molly Wright Steenson (a former Interaction-Ivrea colleague) underlines the intrinsic value of the ethnographic approach as it greatly change what you expected to find.

14 March 2007

Business Week interviews Nokia’s Jan Chipchase

Jan Chipchase
British industrial designer and user anthropologist Jan Chipchase spent several months last year thinking about how the human race shares things. He’s an exploratory human behavioral field researcher at the Nokia Research Center based in Tokyo. Chipchase tries to help multidisciplinary researchers understand how the world will be in the future.

On Mar. 9, he spoke at the TED conference in Monterey. His talk, which he called “Always On: An Introduction to Design Research for Everyone,” quickly became a hot topic of discussion among conference goers.

BusinessWeek.com Innovation Editor Jessi Hempel sat down with him there to discuss what an anthropologist is doing working for a cell-phone company and how behavioral research feeds into the phone maker’s design strategies.

Read interview

10 March 2007

Jan Chipchase of Nokia on delegating positive experiences

The art of delegation
Jan Chipchase, a user anthropologist at Nokia, thinks that at some point we may well be able to delegate entertainment experiences to other people, to be enjoyed at your leisure at a later time and date.

“Experience shifting raises all sorts of interesting questions about empathic design, where from an physiological-emotional perspective experience designers will literally be able put themselves in someone else’s shoes.

What are the characteristics of the people whose experiences will define, well, the essence of the experience we wish to design for, to communicate? It can be anything from designing an out of the box experience to learning, knowing what it feels like to walk in a Sao Paulo subway station, the touch of a razor from a Chinese back street barber, and yes, will encompass sexual encounters.

In this world DRM boils down to removing experiences from human memory and the inevitable badly written DRM leaves its host as a vegetable.

A new profession will arise – people whose job it is to experience stuff, and who will be judged on their ability to capture the subtleties of any difference process, task or context. With a distinction between raw experiences and those enhanced though stimulants, or post production.”

Read full story

21 February 2007

Jan Chipchase of Nokia on understanding alternative scenarios for the future

Jan Chipchase on exploratory research
Jan Chipchase, meanwhile of Nokia Design (and no longer Nokia Research Center) recently presented at the S.E.T. studio in Tokyo.

The two slideshows used during his presentation are available for download.

Exploratory field user research (PowerPoint, 3 mb, 64 slides) describes exactly that: how a company like Nokia uses exploratory field user research techniques to design better products. Techniques covered include street interviews and observations, diaries, shadowing, home visits, contextual interviews, lead users, mystery shoppers, data logging, asking smarter questions, and how all of this is communication in the end. Make sure to read the notes too.

The second presentation, Repair Cultures (PowerPoint, 3.4 mb, 37 slides), is an elaboration of earlier presentations by Chipchase and illustrates how mobile phone repair practices, observed in Ji Lin, Chengdu, Xiamen, Lhasa, Ho Chi Minh City, Delhi, Ulan Bataar and Soweto, ought to be seen as a culture of innovation.

9 February 2007

Jan Chipchase of Nokia on literacy and mobile phone design

Literacy
Illiterate consumers are in many ways lead users for the rest of us, argues Jan Chipchase, principal researcher at Nokia, at his presentation at the LIFT conference.

A person is literate who can with understanding both read and write a short simple statement on his or her everyday life, and can apply this knowledge to function in a textual environment.

799 million people are illiterate. Illiteracy can be found anywhere, including London, New York and Tokyo. In addition, there are many people who are using devices that do not support their native language.

Mobile devices that were designed with a Western audience in mind are increasingly used in places like Africa and India with much lower levels of structured learning.

Design research, as the only tool that can really address this problem, reveals a number of interesting insights that designers can act upon.

- Download presentation (PowerPoint, 5.5 mb, 82 slides)
Related essay

20 November 2006

Nokia’s Jan Chipchase on mobile TV and personal experiences

Mobile TV, Personal Experiences
Jan Chipchase, principal researcher in the Mobile HCI Group at Nokia Research has posted the essay “Mobile TV, Personal Experiences” and the paper “Personal Television: A Qualitative Study of Mobile TV Users in South Korea” on his blog Future Perfect.

The essay is by far the most intelligent thing I have read on mobile TV in a long time. It is not long, it will take you 5 minutes.

Chipchase’s summary:

Learn ten things you didn’t know about Mobile TV in this essay.

A summary? Its all about a personal experiences; home use is surprisingly popular; watching is a small part of the whole; up to 4 people can view a mobile TV at the same time but the act of sharing changes what it means to be a phone; why accessories are a struggle; design content for changing user postures; immersion is possible but is it desirable?; interactive experiences require interaction which is difficult if the user is not holding the device; everything you wanted to know about very personal media consumption but were afraid to ask; and finally what, how and why people watch in secret.

- Read essay “Mobile TV, Personal Experiences”
Download associated powerpoint (4.3 mb)

- Download paper “Personal Television” (pdf, 0.2 mb, 8 pages)
Download associated powerpoint with use cases (7 mb)