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Search results for '"jared spool"'
17 April 2008

Jared Spool: user-centred design is dead?

Jared Spool
As keynote speaker at the IA Summit 2008, Jared Spool puts his foot in it:

Jared Spool, the IA Summit 2008 keynote speaker, posited the idea that UCD was an out-dated methodology that should be retired by the UX community. Why? According to Spool , in the last 30 years, there has not been one website or other digital innovation that can point back to UCD as the defining factor for its success. He floated the idea that design dogma, methodology and formal process were inferior to a well understood shared vision, frequent user feedback and a robust tool box of design tricks & techniques.

Read full story (with Jared Spool presentation)

4 August 2007

Jared Spool on “The Dawning of the Age of Experience”

Web Design World 2007
The Dawning of the Age of Experience” is the title of the one hour keynote speech by Jared Spool, founding partner of User Interface Engineering, at the Web Design World 2007 conference in March 2007 in San Francisco and now available on Google video.

Experience design is no longer a nice-to-have luxury of a few organizations with tons of money and exceptional visionary management. It’s become commonplace for organizations that build products and Web sites. Experience Design is a centerpiece of boardroom discussions and quickly becoming a key performance indicator for many businesses.

However, you can’t just hire a couple of “experience designers” and tell them, “Go do that voodoo that you do so well.” Today’s business environment forces us to build multi-disciplinary teams, compiling a diverse group of skills and experiences to handle the many facets of the technical, business, and user requirements.

In his usual entertaining and insightful manner, Jared talked about what it takes to build a design team that meets today’s needs. See how successful experience design integrates the needs of the users with the requirements of the business; is learned, but not available through introspection; must be invisible to succeed; is cultural; is multi-disciplinary; and thrives best in an “educate and administrate” environment.

You see examples of designs from Apple’s iPod, Netflix, the Mayo Clinic, and Southwest Airlines, to name a few.

The Brave New World: Usability Challenges of Web 2.0” is the title of another recent talk (July 2007 – 1:36:59) by Jared Spool at the Delaware Valley Chapter of the Usability Professionals’ Association (UPA).

Once again, everything is exciting. The advent of social networks, APIs, mashups, RSS, aggregators, and folksonomies promise a world where the information and services we’ve always wanted are delivered right to our browser.

However, delivering on the promise is easier said than done. Moving from a great concept to an exceptional user experience proves to be more of a challenge than many people thought. What works on a small scale is a very different story, when put into production.

As Spiderman’s Uncle Ben pointed out, “With great power comes great responsibility.” Just because we can do all these things doesn’t mean we should do them. In the early 1980’s, the cheap availability of laser printers and digital fonts produced a plethora of documents that more resembled ransom notes than professional publications. We could easily imagine designers going wild with the capabilities of this new technology and not using the restraint necessary to ensure they produce an optimal experience.

In this entertaining and informative presentation, Jared shows examples of the usability challenges we face as the web continues to change and evolve. He discusses the implications of “The Long Tail”, the introduction of a mashup mentality in business environments, and how basic techniques, such as usability testing and field studies, change when social network is at the center of the design.

19 February 2014

Videos of Day 3 of Interaction14 conference

interaction14-250x250

Is there a Language of Interaction Design [Not yet online]
Keynote by Gillian Crampton Smith, Designer/Educator, IUAV University of Venice
> Full description

Bridging the Physical-Digital Divide [44:32]
Jason Mesut, Head of User Experience at Plan Strategic
Bridging the gap between Industrial and Interaction Design to develop better products and services for the physical-digital age
influence on our world. In some ways, this is great, but we seem to have forgotten those designers with the talent for crafting physical forms that can fit into our hands, our homes and our lives.
For a future Internet of Things we need to better engage Industrial Designers in what we do. This talk will explore how we do that.
> Full description

You’re unique. Just like everybody else. Or how your perspective is limiting your work and hindering your team [32:08]
Tash Wong, Chief Coaster Officer of Coastermatic
We pride ourselves on being empathetic, but how does our intrinsic understanding of the world work to hinder us?
Individual perspectives can keep us from understanding others. Using gender as a lens, we can uncover fascinating differences in the ways we use language and storytelling to communicate, as well as distinctive modes of approaching technology.
In this talk, learn how understanding different modes of interacting with the world can provide us with a framework to uncover new ideas, better empathize with users, and build stronger relationships between teams at work.
> Full description

Education summit debrief [40:17]
Dave Malouf, Sr. Manager of Product Design at Rackspace
During the 2014 Interaction Design Education Summit, several educators, practitioners and students participated in an interactive dialogue on the future of interaction design education.
Introduced by Jared Spool, and coached by Gillian Crampton Smith, Daniel Rosenberg and Fred Beecher, scenarios were created and developed around the themes of alternative educational models; design schools versus industry; online presence and portfolios and (new) forms of apprenticeship.
> Full description

Typography at the intersection of Design, Technologies and Languages [37:18]
Peter Bil’ak, Typotheque
Type design is full of contradictions — it is one of the most specialised design disciplines, but also the one whose results audience cannot escape, being bombarded by type daily.
Peter Bilak discusses what thoughts go into designing a typeface — starting with language, technology and how it affects its design.
> Full description

Pair Design and Why You Need It [Not yet online]
Christopher Noessel, Managing Director at Cooper
> Full description

Making More UX Designers: UX Apprenticeship in the Real World [41:00]
Fred Beecher, User Experience Designer at The Nerdery
The demand for user experience designers has skyrocketed. Interest in UX as a career has soared along with that demand. Every UX designer gets asked how to get into the career, but the sad fact is that there’s no real answer to that question. Although demand is high, that demand is only for designers with 2-3 years of experience or more. There are simply not enough experienced designers to fill these positions, and this experience gap is a barrier to offering potential designers a consistent path from interest to employment.
> Full description

Design in motion: the new frontier of interaction [37:58]
Antonio De Pasquale, Senior Interaction Designer at frog
Technological advances have allowed, in the last few years, a big step forward in the dynamic behaviors and interactions patterns that we used to do with software in the past. Motion is one of the key element of this change but how can we imagine & sketch the way something feels & reacts? Starting from the basic of motion design, we’ll discover a set of “standard” motion patterns and how we can sketch & use them in a design project to increase affordance, to simplify complex interactions and to give a new dynamic brand identity to our products.
> Full description

Jam session

A story a day keeps the doctor away [09:49]
Damjan Obal, UX Consultant & Chief Storyteller at Edgar
In July 2013 Damjan embarked on an epic journey to become a better storyteller. The motivation came when his team started working on their startup EdgarTells.me which he co-founded. Their goal is to encourage and help people craft and share their stories. On the other hand, the mission he set for himself was: share one story a day, mostly about and from new, random people he meets.
> Full description

The Shock of the New: Communicating Change [08:32]
Stephanie Aaron, Senior Interaction Design Consultant at Large Financial Institution
You’ve just made something great, now don’t piss off your customers.
We’ve all had the experience – we open an essential site, or our favorite app and – everything is different. It might actually be better – but may not seem so in that moment as we’re trying to accomplish a task.
Learn how we can ease our customers into the new by preparing them for those changes through better communication methods.
> Full description

When Things Come Alive! [09:01]
Gaurav Patekar
This talk presents a novel and fun way of interactions we will have with devices of tomorrow.
Imagine, on one of these regular mornings, you go to your kitchen to make breakfast, and hear your toaster saying “GOOD MORNING” in a voice good enough to brighten up your day. What happens when inanimate objects start talking to us?
This talk presents an exploration into ‘devices with character’. How the character affects the interactions and behavior that they have with us, and how this can be leveraged to make devices more understandable and fun.
> Full description

Interaction béchamel [27:26]
Guillaume Berry
Eating is a primary human need and one of our own energy source. We have developed tools and techniques to hunt, grow, produce and keep all sorts of food. We have designed countless solutions to cook and present food, make it an interesting activity to renew.
Interaction design is like a problem solving cake with human emotions flavors in it… Let’s find out if we can call ourselves Design Chefs or at least be good interaction cooks for people.
> Full description

Designing for Dasein: what philosophy class taught you about design [37:56]
Thomas Wendt
This talk examines philosophical origins of design principles and develop new models of practical implementation.
The main goal of this presentation is to trace design principles and practices back to their philosophical roots in order to gain new insight on how they complement one another.
The talk covers how modern design can be traced back to phenomenology, a philosophical tradition that emphasized active engagement in the world, understanding ourselves through objects, and practical implications of theory. It includes a short history of phenomenology followed by illustrations of how modern designers practice “applied phenomenology” through technology design.
> Full description

User Interaction: Experienced vs Remembered [53:28]
Lucinio Santos, User Experience Engineer at IBM
Your memory of an experience may not match the experience itself as you lived it. What constitutes a positive or negative user experience (as measured by observation or usability evaluations, for example) does not necessarily translate to a corresponding positive or negative memory of that experience (as captured by surveys or other forms of retrospective assessment). This session describes selected research in Psychology and Behavioral Economics relevant to the differential factors affecting how individuals experience their interactions, vs how they remember them. It also discusses how those two facets of an experience are relevant to different aspects of a product’s lifecycle.
> Full description

The Visual [Emotional] Vocabulary of Sustainability [33:43]
Arlene Birt
Structuring messages to help audiences connect with sustainability: Opportunities at the intersection of information, communication, visualization and interaction.
Social and environmental sustainability are complex and daunting topics. Convincing people to adjust their behavior in order to adopt more sustainable patterns is a challenge. When the goal is to help audiences understand the deluge of data, communicating context is highly important. This has a lot to do with establishing an emotional connection between individuals and information.
Data that is designed to tell a story can create a strong connection between high-level, abstract sustainability concepts and the daily, individual actions of consumers.
> Full description

Stop Fighting, Start Designing [33:01]
Dan Brown, co-founder EightShapes
In this session, Dan Brown talks about some basic techniques for dealing with conflict. As a participant, you will discuss ways for dealing with three common situations (perhaps you’ve faced them):
– Excluded from planning: Designers don’t get to participate in planning the project, and find themselves stuck with unreasonable milestones.
– Inconsistent expectations: Project participants and decision-makers change their tune from one meeting to the next.
– Lack of a decision-maker: The project doesn’t have a single point of contact for making decisions, causing the team to spin out when a final call is required.
> Full description

The Computer as Extended Phenotype [32:43]
Steven Pemberton, senior researcher at CWI
The “phenotype” in genetics is any characteristic of an organism like form, development, behaviour, even products of behaviour like birds’ nests. An unusual property of humans is language, where survival information can be passed by other means than genes.
This leads to ‘memes’, analogous to genes, as carriers of information. Memes have allowed humans to create buildings, cities, and fly like gods through the sky, though in cramped surroundings with terrible food. And to create computers.
So are computers part of our phenotype? Should we care?
> Full description

Choice…Gateway to Engagement [30:14]
Brad Nunnally, User Experience Solution Architect at Perficient XD
Understanding the anatomy of a choice is crucial to surviving the new world of product design. If designers, developers and product owners can better understand how choices are made and, more importantly, why they get made, they will be better equipped to disrupt the market. This talk explores the complexity of making choices and how an environment built for choice leads to a better customer experience.
> Full description

Interacting in the Global City [36:18]
Keynote by Saskia Sassen, Professor of Sociology, Columbia University
In today’s global cities, public urban space is constituted in my different ways. Residents in the same neighborhood may have very diverse types of knowledge about their shared public space: The children know the neighborhood at ground level, the tech designer knows the Wi-Fi coverage at the cafes, the homeless know about the night fauna. How do these understandings of urban space affect our view, use, and design of technology?
> Full description

22 December 2011

Why people adopt or wait for new technology

jared_spool

Jared Spool explores the key differences between “Normals” (normal mainstream users) and tech early adopters.

Instead of thinking about ‘early adopters’ and ‘normals’ as if they are two homogeneous groups, he thinks it’s better to look at the motivations that trigger someone to buy into a new technology or solution at various points in the release timeline.

Read article

6 May 2009

Most Interaction09 conference videos now online

Francoise Bourdonnec
Most of the videos of the Interaction09 conference, that took place this February in Vancouver, Canada, are now available online (see also here). Here is a personal selection:

Kars Alfrink: Play in social and tangible interactions
Many of the interactions seen in tangible and social computing are essentially playful. Play can take on many forms, but they all involve people exploring a conceptual space of possibilities. When designing these “embodied” interactions, it is therefore helpful to have a good understanding of play – this session aims to do just that. We’ll compare the role of interaction designers to that of game designers, who concern themselves primarily with the creation of rule-sets.

Dave Malouf – Foundations of Interaction Design: Bringing design critique to interaction design
Foundation and critique are two core elements that separate design from other ways of thinking and practicing creation of ideas and solutions. Foundations are the core elements that we manipulate within our craft. Critique is the way we judge the results of that craft. For critique to be effective though it requires foundation. It is only through our understanding of what it is that makes up our craft, that we can bring consistency and consensus to design criticism. This 25min. presentation is meant to offer the beginnings of a discussion around what could be the foundations of interaction design, how they impact aesthetics of interaction and how they can be used for design critique within an interaction design practice.

Jon Kolko – Design synthesis
Interaction design research activities produce an enormous quantity of raw data, which must be systematically and rigorously analyzed in order to extract meaning and insight. Unfortunately, these methods of analysis are poorly documented and rarely taught. As a result, raw design research data is inappropriately positioned as insight, and the value of research activities is marginalized. Interaction design synthesis methods can be taught, and when selectively applied, visual, diagrammatic synthesis techniques can be completed relatively quickly. This talk will introduce various methods of Synthesis as ways to translate research into meaningful insights.

Aza Raskin – Designing in the open

Marc Rettig – How to change complicated stuff
In the midst of a global conversation about change, many designers are pondering their own impact in the world. How does our experience in software interfaces, web sites, and physical products prepare us to address the profound issues humanity is facing? These issues involve many complex systems, systems too big to fit into the scope of any single company or institution. Design methods are potent at large scale and scope, but what does it take to be effective as a practitioner, as a team, as a company? What is it like to actually achieve a meaningful, sustainable, positive difference in life?

Jared Spool and Friends – Hiring the next generation of Interaction Designers

Luke Wroblewski – Parti and the design sandwich
In architecture, parti refers to the underlying concept of a building. Will it be a public structure that provides safety or a commercial building focused on customer up-selling? Design principles are the guiding light for any parti. They articulate the fundamental goals that all decisions can be measured against and thereby keep the pieces of a project moving toward an integrated whole. But design principles are not enough. Every design consideration has a set of opportunities and limitations that can either add to or detract from the parti. This combination of design principles at the top and design considerations at the bottom allows interaction designers to fill in the middle with meaningful structures that enable people and organizations to interact, communicate, and get things done. In this talk, Luke Wroblewski will illustrate how the World’s most accessed Web page, yahoo.com, was redesigned with a parti and the design sandwich.

(see also earlier post with links to videos of presentations by Dan Saffer, Robert Fabricant and John Thackara).

11 January 2009

10 most common misconceptions about user experience design

misconceptions
Whitney Hess, an independent user experience designer, writer and consultant, asked some of the most influential and widely respected [USA] practitioners in UX (including Steve Baty, Mario Bourque, Dan Brown, Liz Danzico, Bill DeRouchey, Will Evans, Chris Fahey, Kaleem Khan, Livia Labate, Erin Malone, David Malouf, Peter Merholz, Josh Porter, Louis Rosenfeld, Dan Saffer, Jared Spool, and Russ Unger) what they consider to be the biggest misperceptions of what we do. The result is a top 10 list to debunk the myths.

User experience design is NOT…
1. …user interface design
2. …a step in the process
3. …about technology
4. …just about usability
5. …just about the user
6. …expensive
7. …easy
8. …the role of one person or department
9. …a single discipline
10. …a choice

Read full story

Eric Reiss wrote a nice follow-up post.

2 September 2008

The history of interaction with Bill Verplank

Bill Verplank
Jared Spool recently interviewed Bill Verplank, the extremely gentle man at the origins of the fields of interaction design and experience design, whom I had the pleasure of meeting many times at the meanwhile defunct Interaction Design Institute Ivrea.

“Have you ever thought about how many buttons should be on a mouse?

Bill Verplank has. Bill was part of the Xerox PARC team who was responsible for taking the mouse and many other computing paradigms from theory to indispensable.

I had a chance to speak with Bill about his time at PARC and all of his other influential work for this week’s podcast. If you’re interested in where many of today’s computing metaphors come from, or in design and computing history in general, this is the show for you.

Today’s usability, interaction design, and experience design disciplines have their roots in human factors engineering, which many, including Bill, trace back to the 1950s, when the U.S. government was investing heavily in cockpit design of jet fighters. It was upon that foundation, Bill studied design and engineering at Stanford and did his PhD. work at MIT in man-machine systems.

From there, he spent considerable time with Xerox PARC, working on some of the first office systems, including the Xerox Star, which was a major influence for both the Macintosh user interface and Microsoft Windows. Bill continues to trace his history through some of the most influential design agencies of our time, like IDEO, and winds up with a question of design education: what happens when engineers and artists meet and try to create something usable for humans? Bill is seeing important schools, like the Rhode Island School of Design and Carnegie Mellon University, experimenting with programs that put engineers and artists together. We also debated the impact and interpretation of experience design and its impact on various industries.

Our conversation ended with a preview of Bill’s Spotlight Plenary presentation at our UI Conference this fall. Bill is known for his mesmerizing talks where he sketches his points along with the talk. (At the conference, we’ll have a camera set up so you can watch him sketch as he talks!)”

Audio file (mp3) | Text transcript (txt)

26 April 2008

Audio files of IA Summit sessions

IA Summit
The IA Summit was held in Miami, FL from April 10-14. Boxes and Arrows captured many of the main conference sessions.

Keynote: “Journey To The Center of Design”Jared Spool
Jared enlightens and entertains with his keynote address. It now seems the foundations of user-centered design are disintegrating. Notable community members are suggesting UCD practice is burdensome and returns little value.

Search patternsPeter Morville
Peter describes a pattern language for search that explains user psychology and information seek behavior, highlights emerging technologies and interaction models, illustrates repeatable solutions to common problems, and position us all to design better search interfaces and applications.

The information Architect and the Fighter PilotMatthew Milan
Matthew argues that fighter pilot and military strategist John Boyd can teach us a great deal about how to understand, interpret and design for human decision making.

E-service: What we can learn from the customer-service gurusEric Reiss
In this passionate and entertaining presentation, Eric Reiss talks about the design and execution of a system of activities – people, processes, and technology – that ultimately build brand, revenues, and customer satisfaction.

Audiences & artifactsNathan Curtis
Nathan Curtis explores both the articles we produce and the audience we produce them for, revealing what works and what doesn’t.

Data driven design research personasTodd Zaki Warfel
Todd Zaki Warfel engages his audience sharing new visualization techniques he has been using that have personas even more effective and valuable to the design process.

4 September 2007

People regularly featured on this blog

In alphabetical order:

A
Marko Ahtisaari
Ken Anderson

B
Nik Baerten
Genevieve Bell
Chris Bernard
Tim Berners-Lee
Ralf Beuker
Nina Boesch
Danah Boyd
Stefana Broadbent
Tyler Brûlé
Bill Buxton

C
Jan Chipchase
Hilary Cottam
Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi
Alistair Curtis

D
Uday Dandavate
Liz Danzico
Regine Debatty
Paul Dourish

E
Jyri Engeström
Richard Eisermann

G
Jesse James Garrett
Fabien Girardin
Anand Giridharadas
Bruno Giussani
Adam Greenfield

H
Laurent Haug

I
Mizuko Ito

J
Bob Jacobson
Matt Jones

K
Jonathan Kestenbaum
Anne Kirah
Dirk Knemeyer
Jon Kolko
Mike Kuniavsky

L
Loïc Lemeur
Dan Lockton
Victor Lombardi

M
Nico Macdonald
John Maeda
Ranjit Makkuni
Ezio Manzini
Roger Martin
Stefano Marzano
Simona Maschi
Bruce Mau
Grant McCracken
Jess McMullin
Peter Merholz
Crysta Metcalf
Bill Moggridge
Peter Morville
Ulla-Maaria Mutanen

N
Jakob Nielsen
Donald Norman
Nicolas Nova
Bruce Nussbaum

P
Steve Portigal

R
Carlo Ratti
Howard Rheingold
Louis Rosenfeld
Stephen Rustow

S
Dan Saffer
Nathan Shedroff
Jared Spool
Yaniv Steiner
Bruce Sterling

T
John Thackara

V
Marco van Hout
Rob van Kranenburg
Mark Vanderbeeken
Joannes Vandermeulen
Jeffrey Veen
Timo Veikkola
Michele Visciola
Eric von Hippel

W
Tricia Wang
Luke Wroblewski

Z
Paola Zini
Jan-Christoph Zoels

25 August 2007

Latest issue of UPA’s Journal of Usability Studies

JUS
The August 2007 issue of the Journal of Usability Studies, a UPA-published peer-reviewed quarterly journal, just came out. Here is the introduction by editor Avi Parush:

In his invited essay “Surviving our success: Three radical recommendations (PDF)“, Jared Spool points out that in spite of the increasing awareness of usability issues and the growing use of usability professionals, we still need to be cautious with our practice. In his typical style, Jared presents what he considers as radical recommendations that can help us survive the growing “success” of the usability profession.

In contrast to Jared Spool’s Radical Recommendation # 1, Rolf Molich, Robin Jeffries, and Joe Dumas actually suggest how to make useful and usable recommendations based on the results of usability studies. In their article “Making Usability Recommendations Useful and Usable“, they suggest ensuring your recommendations are really likely to improve usability, they cover the overall usability and not just specific aspects, and they should be stated clearly.

The topic of voting systems is still very important to the usability profession. Menno de Jong, Joris van Hoof, and Jordy Gosselt, have studied the usability and reliability of a voting system in the Netherlands. In their article titled: “User research of a voting machine: Preliminary findings and experiences” they found that in terms of vote casting errors, there was a little difference between working with the voting machine and actual “manual” vote.

The issues of metaphors in HCI and their impact on usability have been studied and discussed in many places. David Kaber, Noa Segall, and Rebecca Green address metaphor issues in their article: “Metaphor-based design of high-throughput screening process interfaces“. They combined some methods taken from cognitive engineering into this usability study, reflecting an important expansion of the usability tool box.

1 October 2006

Birth of a new specialty: social networking design

Jared M. Spool
Reflecting on the increasing amount of social networking functionality that is permeating into the products and services we’re dealing with, Jared Spool thinks a new specialty in design will soon emerge to deal with social networking functionality.

“Specialists in this discipline will learn from others, develop a working body of knowledge, and apply their knowledge and experience to new problems in different contexts.”

Read full post

8 August 2005

User Experience Week 2005

Ux_week_2005
Adaptive Path, a San Francisco based experience design company, organises User Experience Week 2005, a week of thought-provoking workshops on current issues, trends and techniques in user experience design in Washington DC, August 22-25, 2005.

Guest speakers include Jared Spool of User Interface Engineering, Marc Rettig of Fit Associates and Eric Costello of Flickr.

Adaptive Path, which positions itself as a consultancy that helps businesses maximise the value of their investment in product development by crafting effective user experiences with an emphasis on measurable results, has an interesting site with many publications and essays.