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Ubiquitous computing

Daily insights on user experience, experience design and people-centred innovation,
by international UX consultancy Experientia.
Searched by tag:

Ubiquitous computing

We are an international experience design consultancy helping companies and organisations to innovate their products, services and processes by putting people and their experiences first.

5 May 2015
Experientia designer Dohun YuLuck Jang 유록 in Design 4 Disaster

Design 4 Disaster features an engaging illustrated safety manual for ship passengers, a personal project by Experientia designer Dohun YuLuck Jang 유록. After the Korean ferry accident last year, Yuluck (who is Korean) wanted to find a way to make safety manuals more interesting to read. He spent one year designing an interactive safety guide […]

16 March 2015
Better Health and Wellbeing: Giving the elderly in Singapore sparkling golden years

Invitation: sharing session, Singapore, 30 March 2015   What are the hopes and fears of the elderly in Singapore? How can designers offer solutions that support the elderly in managing their health and wellness? What can healthcare professionals do to help them keep active? What role can technology play in the elderly’s daily lives? Design consultants […]

1 January 2015
Happy Playful New Year
21 December 2014
Experientia’s Twitter feed live

Experientia has now its own Twitter feed. Four months of Putting People First posts and other links have already been uploaded. If you followed Experientia on Twitter through the feed of its CEO, Mark Vanderbeeken, make sure to now also follow the company (but don’t unfollow Mark, who will keep on tweeting away). And while […]

19 December 2014
Putting People First blog redesigned

Experientia’s Putting People First blog has been redesigned. It is now entirely responsive, allows for easier browsing, searching, and filtering, and features larger images on the posts. The entire history of posts remains accessible as before. We are still tweaking things and welcome any feedback.

27 November 2014
Why the world needs anthropologists – an update

Why the world needs anthropologists – Coming out of the ivory tower Location: Padua, Italy, Centro Culturale Altinate/San Gaetano Date and time: Friday, 5 December 2014, 13:00 – 18:00 Padua, Italy, 5 December 2014 – The second edition of the international symposium of applied anthropologists attempts to erase the boundary between ‘pure’ and ‘applied’ anthropology, […]

25 May 2015

A Bauhaus-inspired, human-centered internet of things

In a short opinion piece in The Guardian, Jenny Judge and Julia Powles state that the Bauhaus movement could be a model for a more human-centered internet of things: “Back in the early 20th century, the Bauhaus movement defined itself with two slogans: first, that form should follow function; and second, that design should be […]

13 May 2015

The thirteen Ps of big data

Big data are often described as being characterised by the ‘3 Vs’: volume, variety, and velocity, sometimes augmented with value, veracity/validity, virality, and viscosity. These characterisations principally come from the worlds of data science and data analytics. From the perspective of critical data researchers, there are different ways in which big data can be described […]

5 May 2015

Intel anthropologist creates data processing tool for Quantified Self community

When data can be both individual, and potentially aggregated across many people, who does and does not have a say in what “the data” ultimately means? A thought provoking piece by Dawn Nafus, an anthropologist at Intel Labs. Through [our] work [with the Quantified Self community] we [anthropologists] realized that there were in fact plenty […]

12 March 2015

The perils of the internet of things

In the not so distant future, every object in your life will be online and talking to one another. Although it will transform the way we live and work, Marc Goodman wants to know if the benefits will outweigh the dangers. “For all the untold benefits of the IoT, its potential downsides are colossal. Adding […]

13 February 2015

Will the internet of things finally kill privacy?

The journalist Hamza Shaban is concerned by the contents of a new US Federal Communications Commission report that probes the privacy implications of connected devices: “That the pervasive collection of information from within our homes might create automated forms of profiling, discrimination, and exploitation seems, to the commission, merely secondary to reassuring strategic business interests.” […]

19 November 2014

Why wearables should be free

Companies shouldn’t just give out wearables for free; they should pay users for data, argues Hans Neubert, frog’s chief creative officer. “Owners of wearable technology, like the upcoming Apple Watch or Microsoft Band, are the most vital part of the product ecosystem because they generate valuable information each time they wear their devices. Yet they […]

2 November 2014

A constructionist approach to behaviour change and the Internet of Things

Dan Lockton just posted an essay on how to enable social and environmental behaviour change by using IoT-type technologies for practical co-creation and constructionist public engagement. It got him immediately some Sunday morning Twitter commentary from Bruce Sterling and John Thackara – to which he reacted – which no doubt will massively increase the readership […]

27 July 2014

Social wearables, as seen by the NYT R&D Group

Noah Feehan of the New York Times Research & Development group explores the concept of social wearables: objects that explicitly leverage their visibility or invisibility to create social affordances. “Wearables that engage with the world around me, and particularly with the people around me, are few and far between right now, but I think that […]

20 July 2014

Baking behavioral nudges into the products we own

Maria Bezaitis, PhD and Principal Engineer of Intel’s User Experience Ethnographic Research Lab, discusses the Real World Web and how internet-enabled sensors will create new kinds of intimacies and engagements. “Commitment and engagement are really powerful sentiments,” said Bezaitis. “The get to the heart of what’s important about our social relations – that we can […]

19 July 2014

Jibo the “family robot” might be oddly charming, or just plain odd

The “world’s first family robot” is based on efforts to elicit emotional response in humans—a powerful idea, but one fraught with challenges, writes Will Knight in the MIT Technology Review. “Resembling a static but animated lampshade (with a slightly Hal-like, glowing-orb face), Jibo is meant to perform relatively simple tasks like capturing video, relaying messages, […]

19 July 2014

Book: Enchanted Objects

Enchanted Objects: Design, Human Desire, and the Internet of Things by David Rose Scribner (July 15, 2014) July 15, 2014 320 pages [Amazon] In the tradition of Who Owns the Future? and The Second Machine Age, David Rose, an MIT Media Lab scientist imagines how everyday objects can intuit our needs and improve our lives. […]

24 April 2014

The Qualified Self and Affective Sensing

The people at frog design have been exploring sensing technologies and their impact on the human experience. Two interesting articles are the result: The Qualified Self: Going Beyond Quantification Just as stories yield data, data yield stories. And just as it is difficult to quantify our lives without data, we cannot qualify them without context […]

24 April 2014

Smart cities need smart citizens

The idea of the SMARTiP project is to take the experience developed by a wide range of existing user-driven, open innovation initiatives in Europe, particularly those developed through Living Labs, and to apply this experience to the challenge of transforming public services by empowering ‘smart citizens’ who are able to use and co-produce innovative Internet-enabled […]

9 April 2014

Tell me a story: augmented reality technology in museums

Museums around the world today face the challenge of increasing and maintaining visitor numbers, especially with younger audiences. A fall in visitors is seen by most as a negative outcome, both financially and in terms of wider social and educational impact. It can happen due to a range of factors, but one of the most […]

17 March 2014

Six ways to design humanity and localism into Smart Cities

A long post by Rick Robinson, Executive Architect at IBM specialising in emerging technologies and Smarter Cities, admonishes Smart Cities planners and designers not to overlook the social needs of cities and communities. After all, he says, the full purpose of cities is: to enable a huge number of individual citizens to live not just […]

16 March 2014

Why smart cities need an urgent reality check

Responsive urban technology sounds enticing but citizens must not be disconnected from plans drawn up on their behalf, argues Gary Graham in The Guardian. “It’s not clear at the moment whether future cities are strategic experiments for [large companies such as IBM, Samsung, Cisco and Intel], or if they are genuinely catalysing the regeneration of […]

27 February 2014

[Book] The City as Interface

The City as Interface How New Media Are Changing the City By Martijn de Waal nai010 Publishers 2014, 208 pages Digital and mobile media are changing the way urban life takes shape and how we experience our built environment. On the face of it, this is mainly a practical matter: thanks to these technologies we […]

9 February 2014

A review of Adam Greenfield’s Against the Smart City

Chris Carlsson started reading Adam Greenfield’s new book, Against the Smart City, “with the expectation that it would be a critical view of the ways our urban lives have changed during the past half decade with the massive adoption of so-called “smart phones” and the rest of the ubiquitous technosphere.” But it turns out, writes […]

9 February 2014

How Big Brother’s going to peek into your connected home

The tech industry easily convinced the public to accept a myriad of free services for the price of some loss of privacy. But getting them to embrace the smart home is going to be a far harder sell, writes Nick Statt. “A Google spin on the smart home could become overwhelmingly influential enough to careen […]

31 December 2013

The epistemology of Big Data

In addressing the insecurities of postmodern thought, Big Data falls prey to some of the same issues of interpretation, writes Michael Pepi in The New Enquirer. More in particular, Pepi points out that “the conditions that generated postmodernism were an intellectual half-step toward the logic that permits the hegemony of networked computing — the era […]

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