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Posts in category 'Interaction design'

7 November 2014

Technology-enabled navigation and mobility for people with sight loss

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Getting around cities is a nerve-wracking experience for too many people, especially those living with sight loss. Too often it feels like public spaces and services – from parks to transport systems – are designed with insufficient consideration for the people they serve.

Cities Unlocked was created to help fix this. Guide Dogs, a UK Charity for the visually impaired, and Microsoft joined forces in 2011 to improve mobility and navigation for people with sight loss, and Future Cities Catapult, a global urban innovation centre, followed in 2013. Over the last year, the team has been working towards realising one ambition: to make cities more accessible for people with sight loss.

They have taken a holistic approach to identifying the challenges that urban environments pose for the visually impaired, and developed a demonstrator device in response. The result is a new headset (video) that allows a smartphone app to provide the wearer with 3D-soundscapes, augmenting reality to provide a richer understanding of their surroundings.

Testing demonstrated that the technology helps people feel more comfortable in their surroundings and better placed to navigate their environment. But this is just the start: the team believe that this research provides a new way of thinking about people, places and the information that flows between the two. By opening the flow of data within cities, we can help everyone move around their city with confidence.

More information:
> Blog post/essay by Dan Hill, executive director of Futures and Best Practice, Future Cities Catapult
> Articles and videos: BBC | Daily Telegraph | Dezeen | CityMetric | The Guardian

19 February 2014

Videos of Day 3 of Interaction14 conference

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Is there a Language of Interaction Design [Not yet online]
Keynote by Gillian Crampton Smith, Designer/Educator, IUAV University of Venice
> Full description

Bridging the Physical-Digital Divide [44:32]
Jason Mesut, Head of User Experience at Plan Strategic
Bridging the gap between Industrial and Interaction Design to develop better products and services for the physical-digital age
influence on our world. In some ways, this is great, but we seem to have forgotten those designers with the talent for crafting physical forms that can fit into our hands, our homes and our lives.
For a future Internet of Things we need to better engage Industrial Designers in what we do. This talk will explore how we do that.
> Full description

You’re unique. Just like everybody else. Or how your perspective is limiting your work and hindering your team [32:08]
Tash Wong, Chief Coaster Officer of Coastermatic
We pride ourselves on being empathetic, but how does our intrinsic understanding of the world work to hinder us?
Individual perspectives can keep us from understanding others. Using gender as a lens, we can uncover fascinating differences in the ways we use language and storytelling to communicate, as well as distinctive modes of approaching technology.
In this talk, learn how understanding different modes of interacting with the world can provide us with a framework to uncover new ideas, better empathize with users, and build stronger relationships between teams at work.
> Full description

Education summit debrief [40:17]
Dave Malouf, Sr. Manager of Product Design at Rackspace
During the 2014 Interaction Design Education Summit, several educators, practitioners and students participated in an interactive dialogue on the future of interaction design education.
Introduced by Jared Spool, and coached by Gillian Crampton Smith, Daniel Rosenberg and Fred Beecher, scenarios were created and developed around the themes of alternative educational models; design schools versus industry; online presence and portfolios and (new) forms of apprenticeship.
> Full description

Typography at the intersection of Design, Technologies and Languages [37:18]
Peter Bil’ak, Typotheque
Type design is full of contradictions — it is one of the most specialised design disciplines, but also the one whose results audience cannot escape, being bombarded by type daily.
Peter Bilak discusses what thoughts go into designing a typeface — starting with language, technology and how it affects its design.
> Full description

Pair Design and Why You Need It [Not yet online]
Christopher Noessel, Managing Director at Cooper
> Full description

Making More UX Designers: UX Apprenticeship in the Real World [41:00]
Fred Beecher, User Experience Designer at The Nerdery
The demand for user experience designers has skyrocketed. Interest in UX as a career has soared along with that demand. Every UX designer gets asked how to get into the career, but the sad fact is that there’s no real answer to that question. Although demand is high, that demand is only for designers with 2-3 years of experience or more. There are simply not enough experienced designers to fill these positions, and this experience gap is a barrier to offering potential designers a consistent path from interest to employment.
> Full description

Design in motion: the new frontier of interaction [37:58]
Antonio De Pasquale, Senior Interaction Designer at frog
Technological advances have allowed, in the last few years, a big step forward in the dynamic behaviors and interactions patterns that we used to do with software in the past. Motion is one of the key element of this change but how can we imagine & sketch the way something feels & reacts? Starting from the basic of motion design, we’ll discover a set of “standard” motion patterns and how we can sketch & use them in a design project to increase affordance, to simplify complex interactions and to give a new dynamic brand identity to our products.
> Full description

Jam session

A story a day keeps the doctor away [09:49]
Damjan Obal, UX Consultant & Chief Storyteller at Edgar
In July 2013 Damjan embarked on an epic journey to become a better storyteller. The motivation came when his team started working on their startup EdgarTells.me which he co-founded. Their goal is to encourage and help people craft and share their stories. On the other hand, the mission he set for himself was: share one story a day, mostly about and from new, random people he meets.
> Full description

The Shock of the New: Communicating Change [08:32]
Stephanie Aaron, Senior Interaction Design Consultant at Large Financial Institution
You’ve just made something great, now don’t piss off your customers.
We’ve all had the experience – we open an essential site, or our favorite app and – everything is different. It might actually be better – but may not seem so in that moment as we’re trying to accomplish a task.
Learn how we can ease our customers into the new by preparing them for those changes through better communication methods.
> Full description

When Things Come Alive! [09:01]
Gaurav Patekar
This talk presents a novel and fun way of interactions we will have with devices of tomorrow.
Imagine, on one of these regular mornings, you go to your kitchen to make breakfast, and hear your toaster saying “GOOD MORNING” in a voice good enough to brighten up your day. What happens when inanimate objects start talking to us?
This talk presents an exploration into ‘devices with character’. How the character affects the interactions and behavior that they have with us, and how this can be leveraged to make devices more understandable and fun.
> Full description

Interaction béchamel [27:26]
Guillaume Berry
Eating is a primary human need and one of our own energy source. We have developed tools and techniques to hunt, grow, produce and keep all sorts of food. We have designed countless solutions to cook and present food, make it an interesting activity to renew.
Interaction design is like a problem solving cake with human emotions flavors in it… Let’s find out if we can call ourselves Design Chefs or at least be good interaction cooks for people.
> Full description

Designing for Dasein: what philosophy class taught you about design [37:56]
Thomas Wendt
This talk examines philosophical origins of design principles and develop new models of practical implementation.
The main goal of this presentation is to trace design principles and practices back to their philosophical roots in order to gain new insight on how they complement one another.
The talk covers how modern design can be traced back to phenomenology, a philosophical tradition that emphasized active engagement in the world, understanding ourselves through objects, and practical implications of theory. It includes a short history of phenomenology followed by illustrations of how modern designers practice “applied phenomenology” through technology design.
> Full description

User Interaction: Experienced vs Remembered [53:28]
Lucinio Santos, User Experience Engineer at IBM
Your memory of an experience may not match the experience itself as you lived it. What constitutes a positive or negative user experience (as measured by observation or usability evaluations, for example) does not necessarily translate to a corresponding positive or negative memory of that experience (as captured by surveys or other forms of retrospective assessment). This session describes selected research in Psychology and Behavioral Economics relevant to the differential factors affecting how individuals experience their interactions, vs how they remember them. It also discusses how those two facets of an experience are relevant to different aspects of a product’s lifecycle.
> Full description

The Visual [Emotional] Vocabulary of Sustainability [33:43]
Arlene Birt
Structuring messages to help audiences connect with sustainability: Opportunities at the intersection of information, communication, visualization and interaction.
Social and environmental sustainability are complex and daunting topics. Convincing people to adjust their behavior in order to adopt more sustainable patterns is a challenge. When the goal is to help audiences understand the deluge of data, communicating context is highly important. This has a lot to do with establishing an emotional connection between individuals and information.
Data that is designed to tell a story can create a strong connection between high-level, abstract sustainability concepts and the daily, individual actions of consumers.
> Full description

Stop Fighting, Start Designing [33:01]
Dan Brown, co-founder EightShapes
In this session, Dan Brown talks about some basic techniques for dealing with conflict. As a participant, you will discuss ways for dealing with three common situations (perhaps you’ve faced them):
– Excluded from planning: Designers don’t get to participate in planning the project, and find themselves stuck with unreasonable milestones.
– Inconsistent expectations: Project participants and decision-makers change their tune from one meeting to the next.
– Lack of a decision-maker: The project doesn’t have a single point of contact for making decisions, causing the team to spin out when a final call is required.
> Full description

The Computer as Extended Phenotype [32:43]
Steven Pemberton, senior researcher at CWI
The “phenotype” in genetics is any characteristic of an organism like form, development, behaviour, even products of behaviour like birds’ nests. An unusual property of humans is language, where survival information can be passed by other means than genes.
This leads to ‘memes’, analogous to genes, as carriers of information. Memes have allowed humans to create buildings, cities, and fly like gods through the sky, though in cramped surroundings with terrible food. And to create computers.
So are computers part of our phenotype? Should we care?
> Full description

Choice…Gateway to Engagement [30:14]
Brad Nunnally, User Experience Solution Architect at Perficient XD
Understanding the anatomy of a choice is crucial to surviving the new world of product design. If designers, developers and product owners can better understand how choices are made and, more importantly, why they get made, they will be better equipped to disrupt the market. This talk explores the complexity of making choices and how an environment built for choice leads to a better customer experience.
> Full description

Interacting in the Global City [36:18]
Keynote by Saskia Sassen, Professor of Sociology, Columbia University
In today’s global cities, public urban space is constituted in my different ways. Residents in the same neighborhood may have very diverse types of knowledge about their shared public space: The children know the neighborhood at ground level, the tech designer knows the Wi-Fi coverage at the cafes, the homeless know about the night fauna. How do these understandings of urban space affect our view, use, and design of technology?
> Full description

19 February 2014

Videos of Day 2 of Interaction14 conference

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Body Languages of Interaction Design [38:53]
Keynote by Irene Au
Design is both art and science, yet while we teach methods and practices for hard design skills, we don’t teach practices that address the art of design, which is often mystified as “creative genius”.
Irene’s talk will explore how through meditation and yoga we can acquire the most critical skills we need to be great designers: how might we become more focused so we can deliver the one or two key features that would be most useful; how might we more effectively cultivate access to our empathy and insight to create usable products; and how we can be more innovative and bring inspiration, delight, and heart to the people who use the products we design.
> Full description

Designing to unleash playfulness and curiosity [30:13]
Jan Willem Huisman, Founder, IJsfontein Interactive Media
Curiosity and playfulness are deeply embedded in our mind and feed the urge for learning and exploring. It’s this behavior that pushes intelligent species forward in their evolution. When Jan Willem graduated multimedia design at the Royal College of Arts in London, he was fascinated by this phenomenon and started his quest to unleash this primal source of energy.
In our current educational system curiosity and playfulness are often seen as inconvenient. However, the digital age gives us the opportunity to redesign the way we interact so we can evoke this energy instead of restricting it. In this presentation Jan Willem shares his quest and his findings on designing to unleash playfulness and curiosity.
> Full description

The Language of Physical Theater [37:58]
Mary Constance Parks
The language of physical theater is like the languages of typography and animation, but more obviously connect to the human.
In this talk, three basic principles from physical theater will be presented that function as high-level constraints on how physically-trained actors can capture peoples’ attention and maintain rhythm and focus during story-telling in a performance. These principles have correlates in film, animation, typography, and spoken discourse. In this talk, the principles will be demonstrated, and the attendees will be encouraged to find parallels between the physical theater structures and aspects of Interaction Design.
> Full description

Communicative Surfaces [15:07]
Svenja Keune, Founder, EmotionLab
What kind of effects do interfaces+interactions have to our everyday life, our senses, our behaviour? How can textiles makea change?
As the world of communication is more and more entmaterialized, this talk focuses on haptical and emotional languages of interaction. Svenja is working with textiles and technology, her special interest is the humans´ relationship to an object and vice versa.
> Full description

Design Thinking at Scale [39:09]
Surya Vanka, Director of User Experience at Microsoft
In his talk, Surya unpacks the five principles underlying Microsoft’s innovative integrated user experience model. He showcases a ten year journey of developing an authentic design voice and language, and describes how this was born from clarity of purpose and a shared sense of mission. He offers insights drawn from the cultural transformation of a large company that was known for technological prowess into one that is driven by user experience.
> Full description

Designing with Sensors: Creating Adaptive Experiences [32:30]
Avi Itzkovitch, Owner, IoT News Network
Avi Itzkovitch presents core concepts for utilizing smart device technologies and sensor data in order to understand context, and helps you add “Adaptive Thinking” to the UX professional’s toolset when designing experiences. In his presentation, Avi demonstrates the importance of understanding context when designing adaptive experiences, gives ideas on how to design adaptive systems and most important, inspires designers to think how smart device technology and context aware applications can enhance the user experience with adaptivity.
> Full description

Evangelizing and Designing Voice User Interface: Adopting VUI in a GUI world [37:37]
Stephen Gay and Susan Hura
Apple’s Siri and Google Now have ignited consumers’ interest in voice user interface (VUI) by delivering valuable and delightful customer experiences. Innovative companies can leverage VUI solutions to create a competitive advantage. But how do you drive the adoption of VUI in an organization with a long GUI-only history? Stephen Gay and Susan Hura share the frameworks they used to evangelize VUI, offer key insights and design principles to help you start your own grassroots VUI movement, and provide best practices and a VUI brainstorming canvas.
> Full description

The Executioner’s Tale [21:36]
Christina Wodtke
Ideas are cheap. Execution is everything.
Christina has spent her career attacking impossible tasks: at Yahoo, taking on the giant Google at search; at Linkedin, bringing people to participate daily at a site about resumes; at MySpace, reinventing the profile; at Zynga, building a social network for play. Some succeeded some did not. All had one thing in common: large groups of people all working toward a single goal. Lean can tell you what to build and Agile tells you how to build it–but neither tell you how to build it as a team. How do you build consensus? How do you inspire outlandish dreams? How do you create accountability in teams? Christina shares her toolkit for clarity and commitment.
> Full description

Jam session

Designing a Better Death / A good Death [Not yet online]
Navit Keren, UX at Huge
> Full description

Here, there be dragons: a fable of UX in the realm of Enterprise SaaS applications [Not yet online]
Krishna Brown, “Billy”
> Full description

How the London Underground map helped us solve the problems of one of the largest financial institutions in the world [Not yet online]
Kent Eisenhuth, Lead Designer at Electronic Ink
> Full description

Bad Design Advice [31:48]
Paolo Malabuyo, User experience design leader, Mercedes-Benz Research & Development North America
Paolo share ssome of the worst UX design advice he has received and what lessons he has really learned from them.
Sometimes you get good advice, often bad advice, and every so often you get bad advice masquerading as good advice. Here are a few in the last category that Paolo has received over the years with an explanation as to why they’re bad and what lessons he really learned from them.
> Full description

Designing for privacy in mobile and web apps [35:44]
Amber Case, Director at Esri
This talk covers best practices for designing web and mobile apps with the privacy of individual users in mind. Privacy has been an even bigger issue with location-based apps, and we ran into it head-first when we began work on Geoloqi. Designing an interface that made one’s personal empowering instead of creepy was our goal. The stories from our design desisions with Geoloqi are also included in this talk.
> Full description

Why Executives Obsess Over Icons (and other insights from the boardroom!) [26:29]
Uday Gajendar, Principal Designer at Citrix
This talk offers insights from real situations working with top-level executives (including the CEO) on major UX projects. We constantly clamor for a seat at ‘the table’ but what happens when you actually get there? How do you assert yourself as an authority of design that is perceived and valued as such, not someone who ‘makes pretty pictures’ or ‘plays with stickies’? Gajendar’s goal in this talk is to set up design leaders for success by raising their ‘executive IQ’. He presents an ‘executive persona’ and various contexts for dealing with executive inputs, with lessons learned.
> Full description

Designing without users [25:47]
Ian Fenn
Learn how to still get users into your design, even if your client has denied access to them.
> Full description

The Humane Enterprise [35:35]
Scott Nazarian, Creative Director at frog design
What new capabilities and service offerings might become possible if we can imbue the foundation—enterprise software and hardware—with human- machine elegance? Can we reconcile deep computing structures and practices with the more “nodal,” or highly mobile and personal sensibility that defines contemporary, daily computation? Interaction and experience designers can to transform human-computer interaction within the enterprise services layer to accomplish this.
> Full description

The Shift: UX Designers as Business Consultants [34:17]
Davide Casali, Experience Designer at Automattic
Businesses are increasingly adopting user-centered approaches to create experiences, moving UX design to be one of the core activities driving the company strategy and operations.
This is an incredibly valuable opportunity that we designers can take to step up and contribute to create the great experiences and services they envision, taking our vision, tools and understanding to a different level. But we need to learn the new skills to play at this table, a table that’s often speaking a different language with a lot of politics and different stakeholders.
> Full description

On earning respect and doing what we love [30:06]
Santiago Bustelo, Design Director, Keikendo
Our career and our professional relationships are a design problem that we can solve with a design process.
How can we designers get the professional respect we want? This talk explores several topics and models that can help not only you, but the design community as well, along the way.
> Full description

The De-intellectualization of Design [46:46]
Keynote by Daniel Rosenberg
During this keynote, Dan Rosenberg intertwines two frequently misunderstood topics relevant to the practice of UX design in the coming decade, which he faces daily in his consulting and educator roles. The first is to debunk a pervasive set of fallacies regarding the differences between designing enterprise solutions and consumer products. The second is the trend towards deintellectualization in UX practice and education, that both diminishes the UX professional value and also reduces our collective capacity to solve the hardest class of design problems. While these topics might seem disconnected, come to this keynote to gain insight into why they are tightly coupled and how both could affect your IXD practice in the future.
> Full description

19 February 2014

Videos of Day 1 of Interaction14 conference

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Languaging reality, dialogue and interaction [41:05]
Keynote by Klaus Krippendorff, Emeritus Professor of Communication at The Annenberg School for Communication, University of Pennsylvania
In his keynote, Klaus distinguishes four theories from the philosophy of language and elaborate on dialogical conceptions of how reality comes to be constructed. To him, languaging – the process of conversing in language – is a creative and fundamentally socio-cultural practice. Language does not merely describe, it creates realities in conversations and actions. Dialogical conceptions raise doubts in several common epistemological assumptions. Questioning them could open possibilities of seeing interaction design in a new way.
> Full description

Food = interaction [44:04]
Bernard Lahousse, Partner at Foodpairing.com
The way we experience food is much more complex than taste only. Food is influenced through the interaction with and between our senses.
How important is our nose and how does that influence the food and combinations we like?
Can color change the way we perceive food? And what about sound, touch, the setting, do they interact with food?
In this talk, Lahousse explores modes where one will taste, smell, touch, hear food in ways never experienced before.
> Full description

Human Interactions: Physical and Virtual [37:44]
Stephanie Akkaoui Hughes, Founder at AKKA
Architecting Interaction explores designing for interaction through space. Space, a sort of physical interface, stimulates human, analog and digital interactions.
All our actions are interactions.
So how can we create the spaces for interaction to emerge? The key is in designing a context that embodies the three qualities of a human context.
> Full description

The UI of Nature: How nature’s hidden language of interfaces will impact the future of interaction [Not yet online]
Zak Brazen, Creative Director at George P. Johnson, and Wyatt Starosta, User Experience Consultant at OpenTable
> Full description

If light could fly [40:35]
Lorna Goulden, Founder, Creative Innovation Works
This presentation introduces the topic of interaction design in the context of the city as interface. With reference to an urban re-development program in the Netherlands, a range of interactive installations were presented to illustrate how a focus on the end-user experience and the application of key experience design principles has been pushing the boundaries of traditional approaches to urban re-development.
> Full description

The lost art of efficiency in interaction design [33:45]
Giles Colborne
For users, sitting home at their computers, it’s hard to judge the passage of time. That means there’s a big difference between perceived efficiency and actual efficiency. Little by little, we’ve lost our our ability to design for actual efficiency.
But perceived efficiency is no longer good enough. We need to create interfaces that people can glance at, use with a flick of the wrist or check a dozen times an hour.
> Full description

Jam session

A Model of Behavioural Design [10:33]
Steve Baty, founder and principal of Meld Studios, and president of IxDA
This talk outlines the key inputs in a model of Behavioural Design and how those inputs help designers to directly target specific behaviours. It looks at the role of interaction design, behavioural psychology, systems thinking and other tools. And it proposes that a model of design with behaviour as its focus offers a coherent and complete approach to design in a way that is consistent with the goals of client organisations.
> Full description

Design matters : Tackling poverty [11:15]
Lea Ward, Creative Director at Cnote
When families are living long term on social assistance, how can a system help them become self reliant?
How can design make a difference in a programme to help families living on social assistance become more self-reliant?
The Dutch city of The Hague started the EU funded pilot “Door-to-Door for Change” to help parents who have been out of the work for years to find work or social activities in their neighbourhood.
This talk shows how deep understanding of those involved helped design a successful programme.
> Full description

Important things about user experience design I’ve learned from my cat [10:18]
Anneli Olsen, Researcher, Tobii Technology
Do you like UX? Do you like cats? Have you ever thought about what they have in common?
Let’s face it – cats are probably the most selfish and self-absorbed creatures on the planet. Everything we’d hate in another human being, we love in our cats. So how have they succeeded in becoming one of our favorite pets? Whatever they’re doing must be a hell of a user experience.
In this talk Anneli presents some of the key things she has learned by doing a user experience evaluation of her cat.
> Full description

UX and the City [28:38]
Jonathan Rez Senior Experience Architect, Razorfish
How the built environment shapes our behaviour and how architects and urban planners design environments to shape our behaviour.
In this presentation he shares some of the lessons he has learnt along the way, while working with urban planners and architects, to create and improve human experiences in the built environment.
> Full description

Everybody Knows When You’re Talking To Your Mother [31:54]
Chris Clark, Product Designer for Fitbit
A crash course in sociolinguistics, and a challenge to find the messages hidden in your own words.
Words tell our customers what we think of them. Are we speaking to them like our elders? Like royalty? Like buddies? Or idiots?
Our language defines the product experience in more ways than we know. From labels to push notifications and support scripts, every turn of phrase hides a legacy of design decisions and company politics.
The way we compose our messages can invite or exclude, empower or admonish in different circumstances. This is a crash course in sociolinguistics, and a challenge to find and iterate on the messages hidden in our work.
> Full description

Pitching Ideas: How to sell your ideas to other people? [34:14]
Jeroen van Geel, interaction director and partner, Oak & Morrow
In this session Jeroen van Geel takes you on a journey through the world of presenting ideas. You will move through the heads of clients and your colleagues, learn what their thoughts and needs are, to the core of your idea and into the world of psychology.
> Full description

The Magic game circle as a model to design behaviorchange [26:19]
Ellis Bartholomeus, EllisinWonderland
If well designed games can be inviting and persuasive and even addictive. Game elements are like ingredients, there is an increasing amount of cooks, restaurants, kitchens, cookbooks, spices and flavours but no consensus is yet found what is play and how it is perceived. The magic game circle can help as a tool to discuss these elements and recipes in a constructive way.
> Full description

Designing your design project [36:16]
Jesmond Allen and James Chudley, both User Experience Directors at cxpartners
Designing large UX projects is a tricky business, particularly when they involve complex requirements, multiple stakeholders, ambitious deliverables and tight timescales.
It’s the part of the design process that no one seems to talk about. Which is strange, as the approach we take can make or break our projects. How do we choose the right techniques? How do we decide the order in which to do things? How do we keep true to the ideals of user centred design within the constraints of a commercial environment? How should our approach flex to accommodate new requirements? How can we keep our ideas fresh in a world of ever-evolving technologies?
> Full description

Curated experiences [37:59]
Thomas Kueber, Design Lead at Groupon, and Christian Drehkopf, Mentor at Startup Bootcamp
Today we need to talk about how we create services that not just run on any device but especially deliver experiences that create superb value for the users in their personal situation. Those services are aware of what people do, want, need, who they are with, which time and which conditions and what restrictions they have to deal with. This has to be accessed on a level far beyond just the device that calls the service.
> Full description

UX Awesomeness Through the Introvert/Extrovert Spectrum [44:47]
Angela Craven, Senior User Experience Designer at EffectiveUI, and SuAnne Hall, Senior UX Product Designer at Mapquest
Whether the idea of introversion speaks to you, or you more readily identify with more extroverted qualities, everyone can benefit from tapping into their quiet side.
The speakers set out to discover how many designers tend to be more on the introverted spectrum, and what makes them successful. We poured over findings from surveying over 100 people about the topic, 6 one-on-one interviews, and a group discussion with 20 UX’ers.
> Full description

Comics: A Medium in Transition [Not yet online]
Keynote by Scott McCloud
> Full description

12 February 2014

Data and design in innovative citizen experiences

 

The past decade has brought enormous and growing benefits to ordinary citizens through applications built on public data.

Any release of data offers advantages to experts, such as developers and journalists, but there is a crucial common factor in the most successful open data applications for non-experts: excellent design, writes Cyd Harrell, UX Evangelist at Code for America.

In fact, open data and citizen-centered design are natural partners, especially as the government 2.0 movement turns to improving service delivery and government interaction in tandem with transparency.

It’s nearly impossible to design innovative citizen experiences without data, but that data will not reach its full potential without careful choices about how to aggregate, present, and enable interaction with it.

“Design is a critical practice for enabling open data to reach its full transformative potential. Without citizens being able to interact with government data directly, we are unlikely to trigger a revolution in how services are provided. We all know how much we need that revolution, for reasons of cost, fairness, and human dignity.

Methods drawn from the user experience field are the easiest way to translate open data into a format that’s usable and accessible for the average (or non-average) citizen. The most successful and broadly used open data projects have always relied on design, whether or not people formally trained in design were part of the teams. Our task now is to bring our best design ideas into our shared movement and take advantage of everything the discipline has to offer. With design, we can give the public back its data in real use, as well as in name.”

9 November 2013

How do you build an electricity bill for the 21st century?

infographicinspired

The more confusing the bill, the more likely it is to be disputed, the less likely it is to be paid. So, from not only an image perspective, but a practical, financial one as well, Illinois-based electric company ComEd realized their bills needed better design. They decided to give that power to the people–who knows better, after all, than civilians who regularly decipher the bills?–and teamed up with Crowdspring, with the main challenge “How do you build an electricity bill for the 21st century?“.

4 November 2013

Experientia presents “BancoSmart”, the innovative ATM interface designed for UniCredit Bank

 

The user-centred approach is moving into finance, as banks increasingly connect to their customers’ needs and wants. As part of this trend, global banking and financial services company UniCredit Bank collaborated with user experience consultancy Experientia to create a user-friendly, people-centred ATM – the BancoSmart.

A customer trials the new BancoSmart interface, with personalised home page.
Click on image to view slideshow

The user-centred approach is moving into finance, as banks increasingly connect to their customers’ needs and wants. As part of this trend, global banking and financial services company UniCredit Bank collaborated with user experience consultancy Experientia to create a user-friendly, people-centred ATM – the BancoSmart.

Experientia has reinvented the ATM interface for UniCredit – making it easier to use, faster, and with more services, all offered through full touchscreen interaction. The new ATM is already in use in selected locations, and will finish its roll out across Italy in 2014.

The first reactions to the BancoSmart interface have been extremely positive, with people commenting on the increased speed, legibility, appealing graphics, and the improvement in features and functions. The highly intuitive ATM interaction allows clients to easily navigate, locate and use functions, from simple features like cash withdrawals to more complicated functions like deposits, information retrieval, bill payments and mobile phone top-ups. The interface is visually attractive and easy to read, with large fonts and clear banking function categories.

Experientia carried out in-depth user experience research as a foundation for the information architecture and service design of the ATM.  Multiple cycles of design, prototyping and user acceptance testing ensured that the final interface is strongly based on people’s banking behaviours and exceeds their expectations and needs for ATM use.

Experientia’s design is a responsive solution that runs on various ATMs including legacy terminals of different providers with various screen sizes and tech specifications. Usability and technical tests were performed across this device range.

BancoSmart offers a full touchscreen interaction, thanks to the extended network of touchscreen ATMs available in Italy (over 6,000 UniCredit touch ATMs, equal to 85% of machines).

The ATM offers several original features, conceived especially for UniCredit Bank, based on the research findings. These include:

  • Speedy withdrawal, with 3 predefined options on the Home Page based on the most frequent behaviours of the user, which the system learns over time. This cuts the time for common task completion by 30%.
  • Georeferenced payment service, which organises bill payment options and filters them based on what is available in the user’s location.
  • Adaptive interface, with a home page that offers personalised content based on the user’s banking profile.
  • Tone of voice, with the creation of a coherent language in all situations, which is more friendly and direct, and provides the correct support during operations.
  • Contextual support and feedback Contextual messages and continuous feedback keep people informed during interaction, particularly in case of data entry errors or other problems, using a clear language and coherent visual support.

UniCredit SpA is an Italian global banking and financial services company. It has approximately 40 million customers and operates in 22 countries.

Experientia® is a global experience design consultancy that practices user research-based and people-centred design. They help companies and organisations conceive and innovate products, services and processes, through a qualitative understanding of people, their mental models and their behaviours.

Experientia won the 2011 Italian National Prize for Innovation in Services, for a low carbon service platform to be implemented in an eco-friendly residential area under construction in Helsinki, “using innovative methodologies devised in Italy.” They have conducted research and design projects in every continent, for industries ranging from mobile telecommunications to sustainability, from automotive to architecture, and much more. Their portfolio includes a range of financial products, aimed at bank and customer use, developed for some of the biggest banks in Italy and Europe.

Experientia’s client roster features Italian and international clients, such as Alcatel Lucent, ASUS, Banca Fideuram, Banca Carige, Condé Nast, CVS Pharmacy, Expedia, Fidelity International, Haier, Intel, Max Mara, Microsoft, Motorola, Mozilla Corporation, Nokia, Samsung Electronics, SAP, Sky,  Trenitalia, Toncelli, UniCredit Bank, United Nations and Vodafone.

 

Contact

Mark Vanderbeeken, Experientia srl, +39 011 812 9687,
[mark dot vanderbeeken at experientia dot com]

4 November 2013

Experientia rivoluziona la user experience degli ATM con “BancoSmart”, l’innovativa interfaccia degli ATM UniCredit

 

Le banche stanno cercando sempre più di entrare in sintonia con le esigenze ed i desideri dei propri clienti, innovando i propri prodotti e servizi secondo una approccio centrato sull’utente. Per dare concretezza a questo principio, UniCredit ha deciso di collaborare con Experientia con l’obiettivo di rinnovare a fondo la user experience del proprio canale ATM.

Un cliente prova la nuova interfaccia di BancoSmart e la home page personalizzata.
Click on image to view slideshow

Le banche stanno cercando sempre più di entrare in sintonia con le esigenze ed i desideri dei propri clienti, innovando i propri prodotti e servizi secondo una approccio centrato sull’utente. Per dare concretezza a questo principio, UniCredit ha deciso di collaborare con Experientia con l’obiettivo di rinnovare a fondo la user experience del proprio canale ATM.

Experientia ha di fatto reinventato l’interfaccia degli ATM UniCredit, rendendola più facile da utilizzare, più veloce e più ricca di servizi, il tutto attraverso un’interazione full touch.

Il nuovo ATM (denominato “BancoSmart”) è già attivo in agenzie selezionate e terminerà il roll out sul territorio italiano nel 2014.

Le prime reazioni al lancio della nuova interfaccia sono state molto positive, in modo particolar riferite alla maggiore velocità, alla grafica più moderna e di facile lettura, al fatto di far emergere con più chiarezza la ricchezza dei servizi offerti. L’interazione intuitiva del nuovo ATM consente ai clienti di navigare, individuare e utilizzare agevolmente tutte le funzioni, da quelle più semplici come il prelievo di contanti a quelle più complesse come il versamento di assegni.

Experientia, prima di procedere con la progettazione, ha condotto una ricerca dettagliata sulla user experience, i cui risultati sono stati alla base dell’architettura dell’informazione e del service design di BancoSmart. Molteplici cicli di design, prototipazione e test con utenti, hanno permesso all’interfaccia di rispondere ai bisogni espressi dalle persone.

BancoSmart funziona su sportelli di fornitori diversi, con schermi di varie dimensioni e specifiche tecniche dissimili fra loro. I test tecnici e i test di usabilità sono stati condotti sull’intera gamma di dispositivi in modo da mantenere inalterata la user experience.

BancoSmart offre un’interazione full touchscreen grazie alla più estesa rete di ATM touch presente in Italia (oltre 6.000 ATM touch UniCredit pari all’85% dell’intero parco posseduto) e presenta funzionalità, alcune del tutto inedite, concepite appositamente per UniCredit e ispirate ai finding emersi dalla ricerca. Tra le principali novità citiamo:

  • Prelievo veloce, con 3 importi immediatamente disponibili sin dalla home page e definiti sulla base dei comportamenti d’uso del cliente, riducendo del 30% il tempo impiegato per il prelievo.
  • Servizi di pagamento georeferenziati, con le opzioni di pagamento organizzate e filtrate per aree geografiche.
  • Interfaccia adattiva, con una home page che offre contenuti personalizzati, adattandosi al profilo dell’utente.
  • Tone of voice unico, con la creazione di un linguaggio coerente in tutte le situazioni, più amichevole, diretto e in grado di fornire il corretto supporto durante le operazioni.
  • Supporto e feedback contestuali fornendo all’utente un aiuto costante durante l’interazione, con messaggi e feedback contestuali, anche in caso di errori o problemi, utilizzando un linguaggio chiaro ed elementi grafici a supporto.

UniCredit S.p.A. è tra i primi gruppi di credito europei e mondiali. Conta oltre 40 milioni di clienti e opera in 22 paesi.

Experientia® è una società internazionale di experience design, il cui obiettivo è supportare società ed organizzazioni a concepire e innovare i propri prodotti, servizi e processi, grazie a una comprensione qualitativa delle persone, dei loro modelli cognitivi e dei loro comportamenti.

Experientia ha vinto il Premio Nazionale per l’Innovazione nei servizi, nel 2011, per un progetto di change behaviour destinato a ridurre le emissioni di carbonio da parte della comunità di residenti di un nuovo complesso residenziale eco sostenibile in costruzione nella città di Helsinki,”utilizzando metodologie innovative concepite in Italia”. Experientia ha condotto ricerca e progetti di design in ogni continente, per settori che spaziano dalle telecomunicazioni mobili alla sostenibilità, dall’automotive all’architettura dall’healthcare all’entertainment e molti altri.

In ambito Finance & Banking Experientia vanta numerose collaborazioni su tutti i principali temi di innovazione, con progetti di ricerca e design sviluppati per alcune fra le maggiori banche italiane ed europee.

La lista di clienti di Experientia annovera aziende e multinazionali italiane e straniere quali:

Alcatel Lucent, ASUS, Banca Fideuram, Banca Carige, Condé Nast, CVS Pharmacy, Expedia, Fidelity International, Haier, Intel, Max Mara, Microsoft, Motorola, Mozilla Corporation, le Nazioni Unite, Nokia, Samsung Electronics, SAP, Sky,  Trenitalia, Toncelli, UniCredit Bank e Vodafone.

 

Contatto

Mark Vanderbeeken, Experientia srl, +39 011 812 9687,
[mark dot vanderbeeken at experientia dot com]

4 November 2013

Ottagono Magazine features Experientia

ottagono

In the article “Interaction Design, After Ivrea” Stefano Mirti reflects on the history of the renowned Interaction Design Institute Ivrea and what was born out of it after the school closed. The article, which is published in the November issue of Ottagono, features Experientia as its first case.

You can view it on Issuu.

English text:

“Experientia was already recently spotlighted in Ottagono‘s pages (May, no. 260). But we can’t fail to mention this company founded in Turin by Pierpaolo Perotto, Mark Vanderbeeken, Michele Visciola and Jan-Christoph Zoels, given its uncommon traits. Top quality (and successful) designers put people, their behaviors and their observation thereof at the center of their research. The 35 people in this international group have worked with some of the world’s leading companies. Clients include the likes of Alcatel-Lucent, Asus, Intel, Mozilla, Samsung, SAP, UniCredit, UNStudio (to name just a few) for whom they develop projects on user research, ethnography, interaction design and strategic design. It’s also fascinating to see how their recent undertakings cross design with worlds that are traditionally apart from it, such as healthcare, urban planning, financial services, and mobility. Design is taken to mean innovation in products, services, and processes, putting people and users at the center of focus. Experientia shows how, in order to design, we must understand how people really live. Today and in the future. This leads to five action areas: vision/ understanding/ design/ prototyping/ testing. In Italy this is an uncommon thing.
www.experientia.com

Highlighted projects:

  • Engaging, intuitive and self-learning user interface prototypes for Alcatel-Lucent‘s high definition 2D and 3D Online TVs. Services and content offerings are easy to access, and the systems are goal-oriented rather than function-oriented.
  • A project for Intel analyzes tablets as innovation opportunities in the healthcare system. The screenshot highlights user interfaces that support doctor workflows and patient engagement.
  • The De-Ga building dashboard is an innovative energy demand management system for a new, low-carbon-footprint real estate development in Turin, Italy. Users have quick access to relevant information concerning alerts and notifications, sustainable service availability, and the local community of residents.
27 October 2013

Book: Speculative Everything

speculative_everything

Speculative Everything
Design, Fiction, and Social Dreaming
By Anthony Dunne and Fiona Raby
MIT Press
Jan 2014, 200 pages
[Amazon link]

Today designers often focus on making technology easy to use, sexy, and consumable. In Speculative Everything, Anthony Dunne and Fiona Raby propose a kind of design that is used as a tool to create not only things but ideas. For them, design is a means of speculating about how things could be—to imagine possible futures. This is not the usual sort of predicting or forecasting, spotting trends and extrapolating; these kinds of predictions have been proven wrong, again and again. Instead, Dunne and Raby pose “what if” questions that are intended to open debate and discussion about the kind of future people want (and do not want).

Speculative Everything offers a tour through an emerging cultural landscape of design ideas, ideals, and approaches. Dunne and Raby cite examples from their own design and teaching and from other projects from fine art, design, architecture, cinema, and photography. They also draw on futurology, political theory, the philosophy of technology, and literary fiction. They show us, for example, ideas for a solar kitchen restaurant; a flypaper robotic clock; a menstruation machine; a cloud-seeding truck; a phantom-limb sensation recorder; and devices for food foraging that use the tools of synthetic biology. Dunne and Raby contend that if we speculate more—about everything—reality will become more malleable. The ideas freed by speculative design increase the odds of achieving desirable futures.

Anthony Dunne is Professor and Head of Interaction Design at the Royal College of Art. He is also a Partner in the design practice Dunne & Raby, London.

Fiona Raby is Professor of Industrial Design at the University of Applied Arts, Vienna, and Reader in Design Interactions at the Royal College of Art.

> Video of Speculative Everything lecture by Anthony Dunne

3 October 2013

Interaction-Ivrea, Arduino and Intel’s Galileo

 

Interaction_Ivrea_arduino

Intel’s Arduino-compatible open-source Galileo development board was launched today in Italy at Rome’s Maker Faire. Rightfully so, as the initiative has such deep Italian roots.

In 2004, a group of programmers, students and teachers at the highly regarded Interaction Design Institute Ivrea (Italy) developed the Arduino platform in order to create a small and inexpensive tool that would help students “prototype interactions.” The Arduino project, which was led by Massimo Banzi, was actually based on an earlier board, called the Programma 2003 (named after the world’s first desktop computer the Programma 101, designed by Piergiorgio Perotto and launched by Olivetti in 1964).

Interaction-Ivrea strongly supported the project and backed Massimo Banzi in keeping the Arduino open source at the end of Interaction-Ivrea in 2005. This enabled Arduino co-founder Massimo Banzi and his team to expand the initiative, grow the Arduino community internationally, and in the end allowed Intel to create the Galileo, as a fully Arduino-compatible board.

One of the people involved in Interaction-Ivrea then, Experientia’s Jan-Christoph Zoels (who is now my business partner), dug up a visual – designed by Giorgio Olivero – that was the very first presentation of Arduino. (Click on the image above for the full pdf). It shows the history of the project, and lists the group of people involved at Interaction-Ivrea.

(Disclosure: I also worked at Interaction Design Institute Ivrea, and Experientia’s CEO, Pierpaolo Perotto is the son of the Programma 101 creator).

Congratulations, Massimo.

27 September 2013

An ethnography of interaction design practice (PhD dissertation)

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Delivering Design: Performance and Materiality in Professional Interaction Design is the title of the PhD dissertation Elizabeth Sarah Goodman defended last year to obtain the degree of Doctor of Philosophy in Information Management and Systems at UC Berkeley. It is now available online.

Abstract

Interaction design is the definition of digital behavior, from desktop software and mobile applications to components of appliances, automobiles, and even biomedical devices. Where architects plan buildings, graphic designers make visual compositions, and industrial designers give form to three-dimensional objects, interaction designers define the digital components of products and services. These include websites, mobile applications, desktop software, automobiles, consumer electronics, and more. Interaction design is a relatively new but fast-growing discipline, emerging with the explosive growth of the World Wide Web. In a software-saturated world, every day, multiple times a day, billions of people encounter the work products of interaction design.

Given the reach of their profession, how interaction designers work is of paramount concern. In considering interaction design, this dissertation turns away from a longstanding question of design studies: How does interaction design demonstrate a special form of human thought? And towards a set of questions drawn from practice-oriented studies of science and technology: What kinds of objects and subjects do interaction design practices make, and how do those practices produce them?

Based on participant observation at three San Francisco interaction design consultancies and interviews with designers in California’s Bay Area, this dissertation argues that performance practices organize interaction design work. By “performance practices,” I mean episodes of storytelling and narrative that take place before an audience of witnesses. These performances instantiate — make visible and tangibly felt — the human and machine behaviors that the static deliverables seem unable on their own to materialize. In doing so, performances of the project help produce and sustain alignment within teams and among designers, clients, and developers.

In this way, a focus on episodes of performance turns our concerns from cognition, in which artifacts assist design thinking, to one of enactment, in which documents, spaces, tools, and bodies actively participating in producing the identities, responsibilities, and capacities of project constituents. It turns our attention to questions of political representation, materiality and politics. From this perspective, it is not necessarily how designers think but how they stage and orchestrate performances of the project that makes accountable, authoritative decision-making on behalf of clients and prospective users possible.

3 September 2013

Book: Interactive Visualization

interactivevisualization

Interactive Visualization: Insight through Inquiry
By Bill Ferster
The MIT Press, 2012
ISBN-10: 0262018152, ISBN-13: 978-0262018159
(Amazon link)

Abstract

Interactive visualization is emerging as a vibrant new form of communication, providing compelling presentations that allow viewers to interact directly with information in order to construct their own understandings of it. Building on a long tradition of print-based information visualization, interactive visualization utilizes the technological capabilities of computers, the Internet, and computer graphics to marshal multifaceted information in the service of making a point visually.

This book offers an introduction to the field, presenting a framework for exploring historical, theoretical, and practical issues. It is not a “how-to” book tied to specific and soon-to-be-outdated software tools, but a guide to the concepts that are central to building interactive visualization projects whatever their ultimate form.

The framework the book presents (known as the ASSERT model, developed by the author), allows the reader to explore the process of interactive visualization in terms of choosing good questions to ask; finding appropriate data for answering them; structuring that information; exploring and analyzing the data; representing the data visually; and telling a story using the data.

Interactive visualization draws on many disciplines to inform the final representation, and the book reflects this, covering basic principles of inquiry, data structuring, information design, statistics, cognitive theory, usability, working with spreadsheets, the Internet, and storytelling.

Bill Ferster is on the faculty of the University of Virginia with a joint appointment to the Center for Technology and Teacher Education at the Curry School of Education and at the Science, Humanities, and Arts Network of Technological Initiatives (SHANTI) at the College of Arts and Sciences.

Book review by By Gerd Waloszek
SAP AG, Design & Frontline Apps – September 3, 2013

“Ferster’s book “stands out from the crowd” because it is based on what I would call a “holistic approach” to information visualization, namely his ASSET model described above. It starts by asking questions and culminates in “telling a compelling story” with the visual representation created from the data.

I am too impatient for such an approach, and prefer a “data-driven” approach instead, where you start right from data having a certain structure, look for a suitable visual representation, and then implement it. This approach could be considered the “SER” section in Ferster’s model, and it is closer to what the author probably would consider a “how to” approach. But, as Ferster writes in his introduction, this was not what he had in mind when he conceived his book. I therefore agree with Shneiderman that Ferster’s book is more tailored to students of the humanities than to those of the natural sciences, particularly considering the tutorials, which are an important ingredient of the book.”

27 August 2013

Designing for transparency and the myth of the modern interface

designing-for-transparency-small

UX consultant Thomas Wendt argues that the arguments in favor of invisible interfaces are making a few key mistakes, namely:

  • Many are assuming that invisibility equates to seamless user experience
  • There is an assumption that an interface can be either visible or invisible
  • There is a conflation between interfaces in general and digital, screen-based interfaces
  • They are not taking in to account the vast amount of theory available about how humans interact with technology

Wendt elucidates these points through a discussion of Martin Heidegger’s analysis of technology and objects in the world, arriving at a new solution: transparent interface design.

“The desire to create invisible interfaces or describe current natural user interfaces (voice, gestural, etc.) as invisible is a mistake. A change in vocabulary from “invisible” to “transparent” is not simply a semantic quibble; it is necessary to frame the discourse and mindset around better interface design. Invisibility is an impossible and undesirable goal. Transparency allows for movement, flexibility, and adaptation between different modes of interaction, which is necessary for modern systems design.”

19 July 2013

Interaction design: what we know and what we need to know

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Recently Steve Whittaker, professor of human-computer interaction at the University of California at Santa Cruz, sat on a national committee to evaluate HCI research funding.

“As part of that process, we discussed past successes and current challenges for HCI. It’s a good time to be thinking about these issues, as HCI is no longer a minority interest. The field has major conferences, active journals, practitioners, and degrees. HCI skills are in demand at the world’s leading technology companies. The success of design-oriented companies like Apple means that everyone understands the importance of interfaces. But what are these external indicators of success based on? What have we achieved, what do we know, and why are others interested in what we do? Where should we go from here?”

In this article, Whittaker first outlines three successes: transformative technology, the importance of experience, and the user-centric design process. He then argues that now we need to build on these successes by taking a more principled approach to what we do.

19 July 2013

Three categories of wearables will become prevalent, says Intel chief

 

Three different categories of device – for the ears, eyes and wrists, and each with its own set of uses – will soon become prevalent, predicts new Intel chief executive Brian Krzanich. What the killer apps of these will be, however, is still anyone’s guess.

“There are two very different visions for how wearable computing will break into the mainstream.

One holds that it will seep into everyday life, through gadgets that perform a single function but remain largely invisible. Wristbands made by Nike and Jawbone are the forerunners of these smart devices, measuring and reporting back to apps to track and analyse aspects of the wearers’ fitness and health.

The other vision involves a full-frontal assault on general-purpose personal computing. In this version of events, a watch or pair of glasses will subsume many of the killer apps of the smartphone, starting with things like making phone calls, checking text messages or taking pictures, before eventually making today’s favourite gadgets redundant. By opening these devices up as platforms for third party developers, their makers hope to increase the odds that they’ll come up with things to make the gadgets indispensable.

Of the two, the history of personal technology points to the former as the more likely.”

19 July 2013

Can interaction design civilize the experience economy?

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The emerging experience economy offers a possibility—yet only a possibility—for rethinking and designing new frameworks for social interaction and new forms of behavior more conducive to mindfulness, conviviality, good sociability, and civility. But such designing, or judgment of design in our contemporary world, can only be grounded upon and proceed from an understanding of the genealogies of interaction design. Interaction codes in civilité manuals and Natural Law are inherent in contemporary approaches to designing experience and interactive products and services. Any viable judgment of these can be possible only from a recognition, and then an elaboration, of the ethical and political implications of each of these codes. This is the task proper to the philosophical genealogy of forms in interaction design.

8 July 2013

Saskia Sassen and Scott McCloud keynote speakers at Interaction14

interaction14-230x180

Interaction 14 just announced its first keynote speakers:

Saskia Sassen is someone to look forward to. A sociology professor at Columbia University, she is known for her critical and thought provoking thinking on a wide variety of themes that are very strongly related to the wider contexts in which we design: from Smart Cities, and urbanising technology, to the “global street” and capitalism, and from the connection between exclusion and globalisation, to the challenges of the megalopolis and the potential for reverse migration.

Scott McCloud is best known for his books about comics theory in which he set a new standard for comics as visual language. His ongoing experiments with comics designed specifically for the web resulted in techniques like the infinite canvas, which allows storytelling in ways not possible in the paged format of a physical book.

4 June 2013

A beautiful kids’ book that combines interactivity with good old-fashioned text

monster

The Jörgits and the End of Winter, an indie fantasy novel for kids nine and up, uses interactivity as a supplement to the story, not a stand-in for it, and shows how interactivity can work in a slightly more substantial text.

The app was created by Anders Sandell, a Finnish-born interaction designer who grew up in Hawaii, studied Chinese language and literature as an undergrad, earned a masters in NYU’s ITP program, and recently wrapped up a three-year stint establishing a toy design program at the Srishti School of Art, Design, and Technology, in Bangalore, India. Unsurprisingly, diversity and community are main themes of the designer’s book.

2 June 2013

Interaction14 website live

 

interaction14home

Next year Interaction14, the top interaction design conference will be in Amsterdam, the second time it is in Europe (after Dublin in 2012).

Now the website is live. And it is responsive (works great on a smartphone).

Participate and be a speaker or workshop chair. Register (starts 10 June). Or simply be inspired, as he theme this year is “Languages of Interaction Design”. Writes Alok Nandi (the conference chair):

“We see language in several contexts. There is spoken language, body language and written language. There is an interface language between user and system. Other languages include the jargon we use to discuss our work and the tools that we use to do our work.

By enhancing the “Languages of Interaction Design” we create new ways to view interactions between people and things. Of particular interest is extending the context from urban to mobile screens and from immersive to sensor based environments.”

Check also this short promotional video:

and be inspired by Amsterdam:

(Disclosure: I am involved with the event organization)