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Posts in category 'Africa'

28 May 2009

CGAP podcast with Jonathan Donner of Microsoft Research India

Jonathan Donner
Leading up to the 2009 Mobile Money Summit CGAP, an independent policy and research centre dedicated to advancing financial access for the world’s poor, is running a podcast series with some of the key people involved in the CGAP/DFID Branchless Banking in 2020 scenarios work.

The process is based on one driving question: How can government and private sector most affect the uptake and usage of branchless banking among the unserved majority by 2020?

Jonathan Donner is a researcher in the Technology for Emerging Markets Group at Microsoft Research India. Previously, Jonathan was a Post-Doctoral Research Fellow at the Earth Institute at Columbia University, and worked for the consultancies Monitor Company and The OTF Group. He holds a Ph.D. from Stanford University in Communication Theory and Research.

Speaking on the side of a workshop that was held in Cape Town last month, Jonathan shared his views on how cash and electronic money aren’t so different when it comes to a question of trust, and how branchless banking is helping poor people spend less time and money to do simple financial transactions.

Listen to interview (mp3)

28 May 2009

Africa banks on cell phones

Ghana cellphones
Global Post reports on how millions in Ghana are entering the banking system through mobile phone system.

“Nobody stands to benefit quite like Africa’s increasingly powerful telecom companies, the conglomerates who built this continent’s cellular towers and enable its calls.

“These guys are going to be more powerful than Google, more powerful than Microsoft, within the locality in which they operate,” Amankwah said. “Already, telecoms move more money than the banks. And they have control over the channels — it’s their sim card. You’re using their network.”

Read full story

25 May 2009

Talking mobile banking in Kenya

mBanking 2009
Erik Hersman reports on his blog White African from the e Fletcher mBanking conference in Nairobi.

Talking Mobile Banking in Kenya
Notes from the panel “Perspectives on Mobile and Branchless Financial Service”

Volume vs Value in Mobile Payment Systems
Talk by Stephen Mwaura Nduati, who is in charge of “Payment Systems” at the Central Bank of Kenya

19 May 2009

New media practices in China, Korea, India, Brazil, Japan and Ghana

 
The blog series on New Media Practices in International Contexts, which I announced in January, is now complete. It covers the unique characteristics of digital media user behaviours in very different socio-cultural contexts of China, Korea, India, Brazil, Japan and Ghana, with a particular interest in the intersection of youth, new media and learning.

The authors, a group of people around Mimi Ito, believe that examining new media practices from an international (and, in some cases, transnational) perspective will enhance their current efforts to theorise youth, new media and learning, a wider MacArthur Foundation Digital Media and Learning Initiative.

China (by Cara Wallis): introductionmobile phonesgaminginternetnew media productionconclusion
Korea (by HyeRyoung Ok): introductioninternetgamingmobile phonesnew media productionconclusion
India (by Anke Schwittay): introductionmobile phonesgaminginternetnew media productionconclusion
Brazil (by Heather Horst): introductioninternetnew media productiongamesmobile phonesconclusion
Japan (by Mimi Ito and Daisuke Okabe): introductioninternetmobile phonesnew media productiongamingconclusion
Ghana (by Araba Sey): introductionmobile phonesinternetnew media productiongamingconclusion

Each case study focuses upon the telecommunications landscape, internet and mobile phone practices, gaming, and new media production, and provides a unique perspective on the ways in which infrastructure, institutions and culture (among other factors) shape contemporary new media practices.

25 April 2009

Africa Gathering in London

Africa Gathering
Today was the Africa Gathering in London and ICT4D, an Austrian NGO dealing with ICT for development, has done an excellent job at summarising them:

Summaries 1
David Hollow – ICT4D Collective / RHUL
* The $100 laptop in Ethiopia – A case study
Nkeiru Joe – International Law department , Virije Universiteit Brussel
* Staying connected to Africa: an ecosystem approach

Summaries 2
Ken Banks – Kiwanja.net / FrontlineSMS
* Mobiles in Africa – How technology is driving social and economic change
Nigel Waller – Movirtu.com
* How we’re creating access to basic phone services for more than a billion people earning less than two dollars a day
Sian Townsend – Google
* Conducting mobile user experience research in sub-Saharan Africa

Summaries 3
Nick Short – University of London Veterinary College
* How mobile telephony is being used to improve veterinary services in East Africa.
Niall Winters & Kevin Walker – London Knowledge Lab
* Village e-Science for Life: Participatory Design of ICT for Rural Agricultural Villages in Kenya
Alex Petrov – Working Villages International
* Building Peace in Eastern Congo: A Village of Hope
Simon Berry – ColaLife.org
* An amazing story that shows how the convening power of the internet can turn the head of a global brand . . . and get them to act.

Summaries 4
Martin Konzett – ICT4D Austria
* ICT4D and grass roots approaches in Africa
Dave Mason – IntraHealthOPEN
* How downloading a song can open the future of a continent.
Juergen Eichholz
* AfriGadget

Panel Discussion
Juliana Rotich, A J Munn, Erik Hersman,
Erik Hersman – White African, Afrigadget, Ushahidi born in South Africa
Alisdair Munn – tcg The Communication Group, trying to enhance understandning social media tools
Juliana Rotich – Ushahidi, Global Voices Online – Twitter, Mathematics, from Zimbabwe

Check also this excellent video trailer of the ICT4D movie project, which deals with mobile phone use in Zanzibar.

19 April 2009

Paper: Mobile phone access and usage in Africa

African e-Index
Research ICT Africa!, a network of universities and research institutions from 19 African countries, has a site with some interesting research papers and presentations:

Mobile telephony access and usage in Africa (2009)
Chabossou, A., Stork, C., Stork, M., Zahonogo. Z.

Towards evidence-based policy in Africa: ICT access and usage in 17 African countries (2009)
Alison Gillwald

Towards evidence based ICT policy and regulation Vol 1 Paper 2: ICT access and usage in Africa (2008)
Alison Gillwald & Christoph Stork

Towards evidence based ICT policy and regulation Vol 1 Paper 3: eSkills (2008)
Philipp Schmidt & Christoph Stork

Towards an African e-Index: telecommunications sector performance in 16 African countries: a supply-side analysis of policy outcomes (2007)
Steve Esselaar, Alison Gillwald and Christoph Stork

Towards an African e-Index: SME e-access and usage in 14 African countries (2006)

(via White African)

11 April 2009

Africa perspective on the role of mobile technologies in fostering social and economic development

South Africa shops
Last week, the W3C Mobile Web Initiative organised a workshop on the “Africa Perspective on the Role of Mobile Technologies in Fostering Social Development” in Maputo, Mozambique.

The workshop set out to understand the specific challenges of using mobile phones and Web technologies to deliver services to underprivileged populations of developing countries, and to capture the specificities of the African context.

“There are today more than half of the population living with less than 3$ a day, and lacking all kind of services (health, education, government…). The incredible growth of the mobile penetration rate last few years is providing a new hope. The potential of simple ICT services on mobiles to improve people’s income has indeed been largely demonstrated. The aim of this workshop is to explore how to leverage these success stories and create an enabling environment that would drive the appearance of numerous services all over the Developing World.”

There were sessions on m-health, technology, mobile activism, enabling environments, m-govenment, m-banking and agriculture.

Presentations and papers are now available online (though some presentations are very concise). Here is a short selection:

Technology

Enabling Environment

M-Banking

4 April 2009

Information technologies and international development

ITID
Information Technologies and International Development, a quarterly peer-reviewed journal that focuses on the intersection of information and communication technologies (ICT) with economic and social development, is a gem.

And the entire contents are available for free online.

Here are some of the recent contributions:
Digital Green: participatory video and mediated instruction for agricultural extension [in India]
Constructing Class Boundaries: gender, aspirations, and shared computing [based on research in India and Chile]
A Peer-to-Peer Internet for the Developing World
The Case of the Occasionally Cheap Computer: low-cost devices and classrooms in the developing regions
Why Don’t People Use Nepali Language Software?
Warana Unwired: replacing PCs with mobile phones in a rural sugar cane cooperative
Problematic Empowerment: West African internet scams as strategic misrepresentation
Sustainability Failures of Rural Telecentres: challenges from the sustainable sccess in rural India (SARI) project
The Impact of Mobile Telephony on Developing Country Micro-Enterprise: a Nigerian case study
ICT in Education Reform in Cambodia: problems, politics, and policies impacting implementation

The Nigerian case study got a lot of feedback recently, as it underlines how in effect mobile phones are excluding millions in the developing world.

19 March 2009

Mobile phones: the silver bullet to bridge the digital divide?

Silver bullet
In a long post Roxanna Samii reports on her blog on the role of the mobile phone in developing countries, and more in particular on the Gash Barka region in Eritrea.

Read full story

10 March 2009

SustainIT – a supplement worth reading

SustainIT
The Independent today introduced SustainIT, the first in a series of three monthly supplements on ICT and globalisation. Some of the articles in the supplement (especially those not written by sponsor BT staff) are a treat:

Corporate social responsibility is vital for business survival
Corporate social responsibility used to be seen as a luxury. No longer. In today’s climate, looking beyond short-term profit is increasingly important – and ICT can help. Roger Trapp explains.

Diane Coyle: For new networking technologies, there are boom times ahead
The whole world should feel the benefit.

Closing the digital divide
How the spread of ICT is improving quality of life for millions in the Third World.

Dreaming up a connected world
Adrian Turpin on the ‘imagineers’ whose visualisations will determine the nature of future communications technologies.

Modern networker: using ICT to change Kenyan life for the better
Ory Okolloh, 32, could be seen as a face of Africa’s connected future.

6 March 2009

Nokia’s Expanding Horizons magazine

Expanding Horizons
Expanding Horizons is a quarterly publication aimed at ICT decision-makers in the private and public sectors.

It explores the socio-economic benefits that mobile technology offers as well as best practices from around the world in order to encourage affordable mobile communications and bring Internet to the next billion consumers. It also shows how to create a favorable environment for market growth.

(via Nokia Conversations)

3 March 2009

From Congo to Kathmandu, how mobiles have transformed the world

Boniface Kamau
The Guardian published a special section on the role of mobile phones in emerging markets:

Nice talking to you … mobile phone use passes milestone
A UN report reveals that half the globe now pays to use one, with the fastest growth taking place in Africa.

How ringing the changes meant bringing in the money
The rapid growth of the mobile phone industry has created billionaires by the bucketload, particularly in developing countries where well-connected business families have been able to gain control of the telecommunications market.

Wired world – the global growth of mobile phone use
Graph

From Congo to Kathmandu, how mobiles have transformed the world
The fastest growth has been in Africa – where people now find their phones indispensable.

Case study: Boniface Kamau, 37
Nairobi, Kenya

Case study: Alan Roberto Lima, 33
Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

Case study: David Morris, 17
Staffordshire, UK

2 March 2009

World’s poor drive growth in global cellphone use

Alaburu Maiga, right, tries to use the camera on his cellphone with the help of an unidentified boy in the village of Gono, Mali, last year.
More than half the world’s population now pay to use a mobile phone and nearly a quarter use the internet, according to an ITU report, as reported by Associated Press.

Six in 10 people around the world now have cellphone subscriptions, signaling that mobile phones are the communications technology of choice, particularly in poor countries, according to a U.N. report published Monday.

By the end of last year there were an estimated 4.1 billion subscriptions globally, compared with about 1 billion in 2002, the International Telecommunication Union said.

Fixed line subscriptions increased at a much slower pace to 1.27 billion from about 1 billion over the same period.

“There has been a clear shift to mobile cellular telephony,” the agency said, noting that developing countries now account for about two-thirds of cellphones in use. In 2002, less than half of mobile subscriptions globally were in the developing world, it said.

Internet use more than doubled. An estimated 23% of people on the planet used the Internet last year, up from 11% in 2002. Poor countries still lag far behind on Internet access, with only 1 in 20 people in Africa going online in 2007 — the most recent year for which firm figures were available.

Read full story: San Francisco Chronicle | The Guardian | USA Today
Read ITU press release
Download report

2 March 2009

Ericsson and mobile communications in Africa

Ericsson in Africa
Ericsson is getting active in African mobile communications and it’s worth checking out what they are up to (even though they don’t prove much, despite the title of the press release).

“Ericsson, the world’s leading provider of telecommunications equipment and services, and pan-African operator Zain have built a wind- and solar-powered site in remote northeast Kenya. Now with access to reliable and affordable mobile communication, villagers in Dertu can make calls, access health services and education and improve their economic future.”

Make sure to watch the video.

Read full story

1 March 2009

Ethan Zuckerman on mobile news and mobile currency in Africa

Ethan Zuckerman
Ethan Zuckerman, a multifaceted thinker whose work focuses on the impact of technology in developing countries, and a research fellow at the Berkman Center for Internet and Society at Harvard Law School, was interviewed on Ideas Project, the Nokia site that explores “where technology and communications may be taking us”.

Information will be used as money (transcript)
Ethan Zuckerman, who specializes in the implementation of transformative technological innovations in developing countries, observes how a system for transferring money in Uganda has anticipated a trend in the use information such as cell phone credits as a viable currency for day to day transactions. These alternative payment systems will be mediated by phone companies and anyone who is in the business of turning money into information.

Shedding new light on Kenyan violence (transcript on same page)
Ethan Zuckerman describes a project called Ushahidi, a project which resulted from the elections in Kenya, that allows anyone around the world to gather reports by mobile phone, email and the web – and map them.

Mobile reporting deepens global narratives (transcript on same page)
If we don’t have reporters in Gomah, but we do have a lot of connected citizens in Gomah, how do we take advantage of that? How do we take advantage of their ability to witness and report, and how do we knit that together into narratives that tell us something we didn’t know previously?

Related:
Money transfer service wows Kenya
Ethan Zuckerman article on m-banking in Africa
Industry report on the future of mobile banking

1 March 2009

Ramesh Srinivasan and Juliana Rotich on the power of local innovation at LIFT09

LIFT 2009
Solidarity was the first afternoon theme of the LIFT conference.

One of the subtle change in the last fifteen years revolves around how collective action and solidarity have changed. Ramesh Srinivasan and Juliana Rotich, two speakers from different parts of the world, showrf how technologies such as mobile devices reshape the rule of living together.

Note: this post contains embedded video which might now not show up in your rss feed.

Ramesh Srinivasan

Ramesh Srinivasan (personal page) is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Information Studies and Design|Media Arts at the University of California Los Angeles. His research interests and doctoral seminars build on his interdisciplinary background as an engineer, designer, social scientist, and ethnographer. His research focuses on convergent questions between new media technologies and global cultures and communities; the use of design and social-science perspectives to analyze the impacts of information technology.

Ramesh started out with a few core questions:
– How is an understanding of how different cultures see the world in different ways fundamental for how technology is conceived and how would a culturally diverse web look like?
– How are technologies, which are themselves cultural artefacts, impacting other cultural worlds in different ways?

He then followed up with a number of stories and observation that illustrate cultural appropriation, and the power of people innovation – people are good at adapting technologies to the uses that benefit them best, based on their own ontologies.

To really make technology matter, we need to reflect upon how policy makers and decision makers view the world. What is their ontology vs the ontology of someone in a village? And how can this gap be bridged?

Juliana Rotich

Juliana Rotich (blog | profile) comes from Kenya and is an author, blogger and digital activist with Global Voices Online. She has a particular focus on the environment. She is also a programme director of Ushahidi, a non-profit web platform for the crowd sourcing and mapping of crisis information. Recently she was selected as one of the TED Fellows.

Juliana’s talk was entitled “Globalism, Mobiles and The Cloud”, and started off with highlighting the work done done by Global Voices, which gives space to events that are not covered by the global media.

One of the important issues in Africa is language translation. That’s why Global Voices started the Lingua project, with a translation in over 18 languages, through the help of volunteer translators.

The mobile phone has now become the platform for development in Africa. Good examples of mobile applications that are relevant in Africa are Mobinfo (developed by a Kenyan for Kenyans), Google SMS Search (launched in Kenya), MXit instant messaging on mobile phones, LiveQuotes (Nairobi stock exchange information), m-Pesa (money transfer via mobile), and health information on “please call me” text messages.

She ends her talk with information on the websites of Sokwanele.com (mashups of maps and political news) and Ushahidi.com (which aggregates and localises).

22 February 2009

Nokia Siemens Network going for “putting people first”

Unite
The Nokia Siemens Network website and its forum site “Unite” contain a wealth of valuable articles and background papers:

16 February 2009

Jeffrey Sachs on the transformational power of mobile devices in Africa

Jeffrey Sachs
Jeffrey Sachs, the director of the Earth Institute at Columbia University and special adviser to the United Nations Secretary-General on the Millennium Development Goals, was interviewed on allAfrica on how mobile devices could potentially revolutionize how development assistance works.

“It doesn’t take more than a few phones to make a transformative difference in an area. We’re seeing small businesses develop by virtue of people having phones, being able to find clients, make purchases, get supplies. There’s e-banking or mobile banking, which has been pioneered in a few places, like Kenya, but I think it’s just going to spread dramatically now. And more and more we’re seeing new services added to the cell phones, and especially as we move from 2G to 3G [second- to third-generation] mobile standards I think we’re going to see an incredible burst of new uses of the phones.”

Read interview

1 February 2009

New report: Mobile phones as media platforms in the global south

The Promise of Ubiquity
African peasants paint their mobile phone number over their front doors. Indian slum dwellers buy SIM cards to use on friends’ handsets. Chinese students spend three months’ allowance on a phone they can use to surf the web. Once almost the exclusive domain of rich countries, the mobile revolution has swept through the developing world. An estimated 3.8 billion people, or half the world’s population, own a mobile, and most of the growth is taking place in the global South. This has deep implications for the media, but the change has been so rapid that it has completely overtaken most media outlets – they are struggling to digest its impact.

The Promise of Ubiquity report was commissioned by Internews Europe in order to help the media to understand the exciting potential, the incredible challenges and the perils of refusing to change. What kind of information services can be carried on the mobile now and in the next five years? Is the mobile viable as an information channel even when many new users may be illiterate? There may be few right answers, but author John West provides a roadmap on how to navigate through the brave new world of mobile telephony. West suggests a checklist of useful questions and of some best practices which have emerged so far.

Through interviews with leaders in the field – software engineers and designers, journalists, and businessmen – the book examines current and future trends, from the dominance of SMS texting to mobile Web, and suggests approaches on how media outlets can negotiate with network operators as well as decide what services to offer.

Read full story
– Download executive summary | full report

31 January 2009

35 Picnic conference videos

PICNIC
On Vimeo you can find no less than 35 videos of the Picnic conference. They are great.

My personal favourites (quite a few):

Jim Stolze: The virtual happiness project
“Virtual Happiness” is a research project that aims to provide insights on the relationship between internet usage and happiness.
– Jim Stolze specializes in new thinking on digital communication.

Matt Hanson: Celebrating Collaborative Creativity
Matt Hanson, a filmmaker, working on the open-source movie project A Swarm of Angels

Panel Discussion: Celebrating Collaborative Creativity
In this fast paced session, several examples of collaborative creativity are under review- what processes and business models appear? What changes will occur in the movie, music, ppublishing and advertising industry?
Moderator: Laurent Haug, entrepreneur and co-founder Liftlab
– Matt Hanson, a filmaker, working on the open-source movie project A Swarm of Angels
– Ton Roosendaal, founder of Blender, an open-source, cross-platform suite of tools for 3D creation
– Katarina Skoberne is the co-founder and managing director of OpenAd.net, ‘The biggest Creative Department’
– Pim Betist, a music lover and founder of Sellaband, an audience supported business model for bands.
– Eileen Gittens, founder and CEO of Blurb, has built a creative publishing platform that makes it easy for anyone to design, publish, share and sell real bookstore-quality books

Ben Cerveny: Can you see what I know?
Artists, scientists and designers are exploring a new world of software aesthetics and developing new languages for interactive and visual expression. How can we make information intuitively meaningful?
– Ben Cerveny is a strategic and conceptual advisor to Stamen, specialists in creative visualization. He is highly regarded experience designer and conceptual strategist.

Stefan Agamanolis: Dueling with Distance
Based on his work at MIT and Distance Lab, Stefan Agamanolis reports on hot trends in communication and connectedness that are doing battle with distance in unexpected ways, ranging from sports games you play over a distance to telephones crossed with flotation tanks.
– Stefan Agamanolis is the Chief Executive and Research director of Distance Lab

Matt Jones: The Emerging Real-Time Social Web
Matt Jones is a creative director and user experience designer who worked a Sapient and the BBC before founding travel service Dopplr

Jyri Engestrom: The Emerging Real-Time Social Web
Jyri Engestrom is a social scientist as well as the founder of the Finnish mobile presence service Jaiku, which was acquired by Google in 2007; his subsequent move to Silicon Valley resulted in his renewed attention to social processes in new media platforms.

Conversation the Emerging Real-Time Social Web
With ubiquitous internet connections and a surge of connected mobile services, slices of reality can be saved that people could not capture before. Saving and sharing our presence, we can feel those of others as well. We are on the verge of a reality with ‘social peripheral vision’, in which ambient friendships flourish and life stories and life’s details are stored, shared and searchable.
– Matt Jones is a creative director and user experience designer who worked a Sapient and the BBC before founding travel service Dopplr
– Philip Rosedale is founder of the 3D online world Second Life and a pioneer in virtual worlds
– Addy Feuerstein is the co-founder and CEO of AllofMe, a service that allows you to create digital personal timelines form digital assests such as pictures, videos, and blogs.
– Jyri Engestrom is a social scientist as well as the founder of the Finnish mobile presence service Jaiku, which was acquired by Google in 2007

Younghee Jung: Design as a Collaborative process
New interactions develop into new design practices; new processes induce new forms of creativity. How can creators involve the peopele they want to create for in their work?
– Younghee Jung, a senior design manager at Nokia, shows how users are imagining new products.

Bill Moggridge: Design as a Collaborative Process
New interactions develop into new design practices; new processes induce new forms of creativity. How can creators invovle the people they want to create for in their work?
– Bill Moggridge is founder of IDEO, one of the most successful design firms in the world and of the first to integrate the design of software and hardware into the practice of industrial design.

Ethan Zuckerman: Surprising Africa
A presentation on vibrant and fast-moving tecnological and creative developments in cities and rural areas across Africa, from mobile naking to new communication patterns.
– Ethan Zuckerman, the co-founder of Global Voices, a research fellow at the Berkman Center, and a prodigious blogger interested in hte impact of technology on the developing world.

Conversation with Ethan Zuckerman, Helen Omwando and Binyavanga Wainaina: Surprising Africa
An update on vibrant and fast-moving technological and creative developments in cities and rural areas across Africa, from mobile banking to new communication patterns.
– Ethan Zuckerman, the co-founder of Global Voices, a research fellow at the Berkman Center, and a prodigious blogger interested in the impact of technology on the developing world
– Helen Omwando, head of market intelligence for Royal Philips Electronics
– Binyavanga Wainaina, Kenyan author and journalist

Clay Shirky: Here Comes Everybody
A revelatory examination of how the spread of new forms of social interaction enabled by technology is changing the way humans form groups and exict within them. Our age’s new technologies of social networking are evolving- and causing us to evolve into new groups doing new things in new ways.
– Clay Shirky is a leading Internet thinker, the author of Here Comes Everybody, and a sharp analyst of social media developments.

Wolfgang Wagener and Jared Blumenfeld: Eco Map
What can we do with an open source collaboration platform that enables citizens and business to see collective results of their actions?
– Wolfgang Wagener, Director, Sustainable Cities Connected Urban Development, CISCO and Jared Blumenfeld, Director, Department of the Environment, City and County of San Francisco

Euro Beinat: The Visible City
What if we could view an entire city from above, as if from an airplane – and see not only the buildings and squares but also all the human beings populating it, oudoors and indoors?
– Euro Beinat, professor of location awareness at Salzburg University, CEO if Geodan Mobile Solutions, and founder of the Senseable Future Foundation

Stan Williams: Tracking our World
CeNSE: The Central Nervous System for the Earth is based on the believe that nanotechnology has the potential to revolutionise human interaction with the Earth as profoundly as the Internet has revolutionised personal and business interaction.
– Stan Williams, HP senior fellow; director, HP Information and Quantum Systems Lab

Adam Greenfield: The Long Here, the Big Now, and other tales of the networked city
Future urban life will thrive on new modes of perception and experience, based on real-time data and feedback. What will the networked city feel like to its users? How will it transform our sense of the metropolitan?
– Adam Greenfield , head of design direction for Nokia and author of Everyware

Charles Leadbeater – We Think: The Power of Mass Creativity
The conflict between the rising surge of mass collaboration and the attempts to retain top-down control will be one of the defining battles of our time. An exploration of what this means for our culture, the way we work, government, science and business.
– Charles Leadbeater, thinker, famed policy advisor to former UK prime Minister Tony Blair, and author of We Think, a groundbreaking analysis of a changing world

Charles Leadbeater in conversation with Clay Shirky
The conflict between the rising surge of mass collaboration and the attempts to retain top-down control will be one of the defining battles of our time. An exploration of what this means for our culture, the way we work, government, science and business.
– Charles Leadbeater, thinker, famed policy advisor to former UK Prime Minister Tony Blair, and author of We Think, a groundbreaking analysis of a changing world,
– Clay Shirky, leading Internet thinker

(via Laurent Haug)