Digital Revolution
The new BBC Digital Revolution blog explores the way the web is changing our lives. Some recent posts:

Tim Berners-Lee on the web and the developing world
It’s the connection, the sharing, the two-way communication that seem to fuel Sir Tim’s views there. Sir Tim sees Africa not just as influenced by the web but also as influencer. But is he right?

Two ways to destroy the web: hack it or cut it
There have been very few instances of nation-on-nation cyber attacks, but those that have occurred have hinted at the new possibilities for real disruption. There appear to be two pathways: the soft and hard attacks.

Internet freedom and Digital Revolution? Grow up.
In the West, the state is slowly but surely being replaced by the Internet, an abstractly distributed version of our old certainties about power and authority.

What’s become of the blogosphere?
The blogsophere is dying, apparently. The long tail of user-generated content, brimming with idiosyncrasy and experimentation – the great hope of the libertarian levelling ground promoted by the Web’s founding fathers – is petering out.

The rise of the eNation
Tread lightly, fellow revolutionaries. For our rulers may be benevolent now, but may eventually succumb to the corruption that often dogs the powerful, and we desperately don’t want them to pull the plug.

Governments block the web because they know it can make the world a better place
Bill Thompson presented his views on the web in the context of the nation state at the Web at 20 event. So, does this ring true? Is the web a revolutionary tool that allows us to watch the watchmen? Or are governments able to thwart Bill’s vision of the open and critical eyes on their actions?