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Putting People First

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November 2013
11 November 2013

Two new reports by ARUP

 

Designing with Data
The Royal Institute of British Architects (RIBA) and ARUP have released Designing with Data: Shaping Our Future Cities, a new report that explores the massive potential role that data could have in the planning and design of our buildings and cities, reports Dexigner.
The report identifies the main approaches to working with data for those involved in designing and planning cities. Better data can offer a deep insight into people’s needs and has the potential to transform the way architects and urban planners design our built environments. This could result in cheaper experimentation and testing of designs before construction begins. It also promises the chance for greater consultation with potential users – speeding up the process, saving time and money and resulting in better and more affordable design.

Museums in the Digital Age
Museums of the future may be filled with 3D-printed replicas, green walls and sensory surfaces, according to a report by Arup (writes Wired UK).
Arup, the London engineering firm behind Japan’s planned Giant Observation Wheel, the world’s first algae-powered building and Thomas Heatherwick’s Garden Bridge, compiled the report Museums in the Digital Age with help from Central Saint Martins’ students on the MA Practice for Narrative Environments course.
The report recognises that museums now have to cater for increasingly disparate visitor groups from an aging population through to the Facebook generation, as well as an expanding global middle class which will give rise to a mass cultural boom. Through investigating the experiential requirements of each, the report suggests a number of changes to future museum design and investments.

10 November 2013

[Book] Connect: Design for an Empathic Society

connect

Connect: Design for an Empathic Society
by Sabine Wildevuur, Dick van Dijk, Thomas Hammer-Jakobson, Mie Bjerre, Anne Äyväri, and Jesper Lund
BIS Publishers, 2014
216 pages
[Amazon link]

Abstract

The prospects are clear: we will probably live longer. The number of people aged 65 and up will increase enormously over the next few decades. Society will change as a result, but in what manner?

Europe – and, in fact, probably the world – faces the challenge of preventing loneliness and isolation amongst a growing group of senior people. The oldest part of the population is at particular risk of becoming isolated and lonely as they grow older and their work-related networks erode. While working in the field of technology and aging, the authors discovered that there is a whole new field to be explored, namely the phenomenon of connectedness.

This book is written by a group of authors with very different backgrounds, varying from business, ICT, marketing, anthropology, medicine, design and computer interaction. They all felt the urge to explore this field of connectedness and they discovered new opportunities for the emerging market of ‘aging-driven design’.

Design for connectedness is about support for behavioral change that increases connectedness in day-to-day routines. It’s not about encouraging a completely novel set of behaviors. Rather, it is about supporting human connections, especially during major transitions in life such as retirement.

Authors

Sabine Wildevuur works as Head of Waag Society‘s Creative Care Lab. She has an academic background in Medicine and Mass Communication and works as a programme manager, researcher and writer. She is passionate about innovation in the interdisciplinary field of healthcare, design, the arts, new media and ICT.

Dick van Dijk is Creative Director at Waag Society. He is interested in the crossover between virtual and physical interactions, in creating a narrative space, a place for imagination. Dick has a background in Business Economics and History of Art and is currently extending his creative skills in the context of an Arts Academy.

Thomas Hammer-Jakobson is Chairman of Copenhagen Living Lab, and has previously held top-level positions in the Danish Broadcasting Corporation for more than 10 years. Thomas is a specialist in welfare innovation. As such he has initiated and led many national and international projects in the field of elderly care and independent living.

Mie Bjerre is a partner at Copenhagen LivingLab, which assists public and private organisations in realising innovation and business potential. Mie has a background in European ethnology, realising while travelling that “understanding cultures, people and why people are doing what they’re doing holds great value when innovating”

Anne Äyväri, D.Sc. (Econ.), currently works as a Principal Lecturer at Laurea University of Applied Sciences, Finland. Her main responsibilities include managing RDI projects aiming at developing services and procedures in the social and health care sector. Her research interests include small firm networks, networking abilities, and learning in networks.

Jesper Lund has worked with digital innovation and user-centric design since 2004. He is currently working as a teacher and researcher at Halmstad University in Sweden, where he has been involved as a researcher in several R&D projects within the health technology field.

10 November 2013

Ergonomics in the digital age

thenewergonomics

In this age of ubiquitous computing, what exactly are we doing to our bodies, asks Avinash Rajagopal in a highly recommended piece in Metropolis Magazine:

“Today, our fingers are furiously swiping and typing, our shoulders are hunched, our spines are curved, our necks are either bent over tiny screens or swiveling to catch the magnificent sweep of big ones, and we increasingly want to start doing these things earlier in life and keep doing them later in life. We continue to go wide-eyed at the release of each new smartphone and we want to use technology everywhere, with little thought for the physiological and cultural consequences. How can we learn to use our bodies more kindly in this new millennium? [...]

Such awkward collisions of the digital and the physical show how ill-equipped designers are to deal with the range of possibilities that technology affords. This is because there is a deep divide between the skill sets they use to tackle each of the two realms. The designers of software and interfaces have relied on specialists in Human-Computer Interaction (HCI) to tell them how our eyes, fingertips, and brains process information, while industrial designers have traditionally turned to physical ergonomists for design guidelines and anthropometric data on how our limbs move and behave.”

Rajagopal ends with a recommendation: “We must apply Occam’s razor to ergonomic design. The creative breakthrough in the field will ultimately be when designers can bring the greatest comfort to the maximum number of people, in a variety of situations, in the simplest way possible. That was always the basic tenet of human-centered design, and one we would do well to recall in these tech-fetishistic days.”

9 November 2013

All technology is assistive technology

lariat

All technology is assistive technology, argues Sara Hendren in a long and very insightful article.

“Honestly – what technology are you using that’s not assistive? Your smartphone? Your eyeglasses? Headphones? And those three examples alone are assisting you in multiple registers: They’re enabling or augmenting a sensory experience, say, or providing navigational information. But they’re also allowing you to decide whether to be available for approach in public, or not; to check out or in on a conversation or meeting in a bunch of subtle ways; to identify, by your choice of brand or look, with one culture group and not another.” [...]

“Undoing the distinctions between design for disability and design in general yields a couple of goods: It brings new attention to technologies that are profound in their use and impact on physical and political accessibility. The advanced replacement limbs, all-terrain wheelchairs, and exoskeletons you can find now are evidence of this new attention.

It also brings a productive uncertainty and a powerful friction to the task of designing technologies of all kinds. Whether you’re designing for an established need or seeking an application for a technical novelty, you might take more time before confidently assigning it to a user, or to over-determining its modes of deployment—it might be for practical ends, or for play, or for something else you’ve not yet imagined.”

The author then goes on to suggest some possible dispositions for designers and artists taking a look at ability and disability:
1. Question invisibility as the assumed goal.
2. Rethink the default bodily experience.
3. Consider fine gradations of qualitative change.
4. Uncouple medical technologies from their diagnostic contexts.
5. Design for one.
6. Let the tools you make ask questions, not just solve problems.

9 November 2013

How a deeper customer understanding can energize innovation

how-a-deeper-customer-understanding-can-energize-innovation

In today’s crowded and competitive energy markets, many product manufacturers fall short in their marketing, writes Andy Beck, Executive Vice President of Makovsky’s energy and sustainability practice.

“They’re forgetting a vital principle: that we motivate behavior by understanding and addressing the desires of the end-user customer. Vaunting product attributes–the default marketing formula among many companies–will only move the needle so far. What’s often lacking is the missing link: direct marketing to end-user customers, based on genuine insight into how the products benefit end-users and addresses their needs.” [...]

“One of the best ways that companies can begin to engage with end-users directly is through specialized “vertical” media. As opposed to marketing through a blanketed wide-ranging approach, the vertical strategy focuses on targeted sources where interested customers look to get specialized information. There is a web of trade journals, blogs, Internet forums, and social media outlets that target every relevant end-user, including those who influence them. This media is usually on the look-out for quality content–be it bylined articles or expert commentary. There are few better ways to build a company’s reputation with the individuals or groups that will ultimately purchase and use their product.”

9 November 2013

Ubiquitous across globe, cellphones have become tool for doing good

CELL-articleInline

With 96 percent of the world connected, organizations are using mobile phones to deliver, via texts, water, energy, financial services, health care, even education.

“The number of such initiatives seems likely to increase. “The development community is eager to learn more about how to use mobiles effectively,” said Nick Martin, a founder of Tech Change, a social enterprise based in Washington that educates development practitioners via online courses.

Mr. Martin said his most popular course has been Mobiles for Development. In the last three years, TechChange has taught the course eight times to nearly 400 participants from over 60 countries.”

9 November 2013

How do you build an electricity bill for the 21st century?

infographicinspired

The more confusing the bill, the more likely it is to be disputed, the less likely it is to be paid. So, from not only an image perspective, but a practical, financial one as well, Illinois-based electric company ComEd realized their bills needed better design. They decided to give that power to the people–who knows better, after all, than civilians who regularly decipher the bills?–and teamed up with Crowdspring, with the main challenge “How do you build an electricity bill for the 21st century?“.

9 November 2013

The rise of the mobile-born

child-with-tablet

The mobile-born generation will drive a radical rethinking of office productivity, writes Paul Holland, a general partner at Foundation Capital,

“Fast-forward a few years and we’ll see a new workplace with workstations akin to air traffic control centers powered by multiple touch-, swipe- and voice-enabled devices, allowing workers to visualize and manipulate information tactically, driving the adoption of new user-interfaces and fundamental changes in software and hardware. Think the new FOX newsroom, just without the “fair and balanced” reporting.

The way we interact with colleagues or business partners will change as we move to a mobile enterprise environment. We’re beginning to see new companies focused on augmented memory. Refresh, for instance, has created a dossier to put an end to small talk for your next business meeting. A nice-to-have now, but as the mobile-born mature, these services will become a must-have.

But this is just the beginning. It’s hardly far-fetched to imagine companies that exist and are run entirely in the cloud by a de-territorialized mobile workforce. Already we carry much of our day job’s office communications, data, colleagues, customers and products around in our pockets. This trend will only accelerate as the mobile-born found their own companies around entirely new expectations for organizational structures and workforce optimization.”

8 November 2013

Medical advice just a touch away with smartphone apps

cardiacdesign

Devices once only in the hands of doctors, such as heart or blood pressure monitors, are now in the pockets of consumers, putting them in charge of their health and making medical care more accessible. Consumers are also increasingly armed with “wellness” apps — simpler devices to monitor diets, exercise and weight to help them stay out of the doctor’s office — that make up most of the 97,000 health related mobile-apps available.

Out of a score of 100, more than 90 percent of apps received a functionality score of 40 or less. In other words, consumers don’t find most apps all that useful.

8 November 2013

‘Why newsrooms need anthropologists’

Sarah_And_Wale_pic.jpg_resized_117_117

Journalism and anthropology both purport to observe and analyse human behaviour and experience, albeit in different ways and over extremely divergent timescales. And they both serve up their findings to the wider world in order to give it greater understanding of itself – and of what it ‘means’ to be ‘human’.

Walé Azeez and Sarah Marshall, both journalists with anthropology backgrounds, argue that combining the two could make for more ‘holistic’ and context-rich news storytelling and challenge much of the received wisdom and orthodox commentary often taken at face value.

News anthropologists, they argue, will not only be able to bolster the research process into stories and world events, particularly for long-form features and investigative work, but also complement the use of analytics and help drill down into so-called big data.

6 November 2013

Experientia taking on the Nordic Built Challenge, Finland

 

Experientia team in final four, with community-minded concept

“The fundamental idea of the entry – the ENGAGE community noticeboard concept – is worth special mention. Transparent information is used to encourage people to adapt to more eco-efficient ways of living and working.”

The new double façade, constructed for ENGAGE is an adjustable independent structure that provides a brand-new update to the building’s architectural image.

The new double façade, constructed for ENGAGE is an adjustable independent structure that provides a brand-new update to the building’s architectural image.

Experientia continues to grow its portfolio of sustainable behavioural change concepts with the enGAGE community noticeboard. The concept – part of a competition entry for the Nordic Built Challenge architecture competition – was commended by the contest’s Finland jury. enGAGE was an original proposal for the complete renovation of the Hippostalo building, owned by Senate Properties in Tampere, Finland. Senate Properties is a government-owned enterprise controlled by the Finnish Ministry of Finance.

Just 4 teams – out of 43 submitted proposals – were selected as finalists for the Finnish part of the second stage competition of the Nordic Built Challenge, Finnish section. The second stage required the finalists to refine and elaborate the proposals that they submitted in the first stage of the competition. Experientia’s team, made up of Granlund (energy and resources management consultant), Gullsten-Inkinen (architecture and interior design), Matt Batey (sustainability consultant), and Buro Happold (façade engineering) was awarded joint-second place. The submission, entitled enGAGE, focused on involving people and encouraging behavioural change as key strategies to maximise the infrastructural and architectural renewal of the ’70s government office building. enGAGE aimed at going beyond carbon neutrality to achieve an EnergyPlus building.

Integrating the senior residents into Hippostalo enGaGe shows how senior residents are invited to get involved in both using and providing the community services.

Integrating the senior residents into Hippostalo enGaGe shows how senior residents are invited to get involved in both using and providing the community services.

The competion requirements implied a complete rethink of the space use – only 40% of office staffers use the building at any time. The enGAGE team thoroughly examined the building’s energy footprint, potential for onsite energy production and the opportunities for mixed use concepts. Experientia’s contribution to the team focused on new ways to use the spaces in the building, including service concepts, a different tenant mix, alternative organisations of individual and collaborative work spaces, and the introduction of innovative technologies for daily work/life practices.

While the overall submission was noted as demonstrating an “Overall high quality of solution with regards to architecture, cityscape and other uses of the building,” it was Experientia’s Community Noticeboard that was singled out by the jury for its focus on behavioural change: “The fundamental idea of the entry – the ENGAGE community noticeboard concept –is worth special mention. Transparent information is used to encourage people to adapt to more eco-efficient ways of living and working.”

 

The Dashboard acts as a community noticeboard, making the built environment truly transparent to its occupants.

The Dashboard acts as a community noticeboard, making the built environment truly transparent to its occupants.

Design-oriented concepts for the daily environment are not just about meeting functional needs with up-to-date technological solutions. They can also help to achieve the social and spatial connections that architecture and integrated communications can provide. Our design highlights a set of cornerstones for intervention and action such as:

  • Connecting the planners of a mixed-use building with the future stakeholders;
  • Creating tools to foster new ways of working and new sustainable lifestyles while tightening the links within communities;
  • Developing energy demand management smart systems design and implementation roadmaps;
  • Implementing a user-centered design process (stakeholder engagement, participatory design, design strategies validation).

 

The personal Dashboard (through its channels: desktop, mobile, large-display) will offer constant support in planning space use, equipment and energy demand.

The personal Dashboard (through its channels: desktop, mobile, large-display) will offer constant support in planning space use, equipment and energy demand.

enGAGE envisions opening up the government building to provide a range of community-focused services. It fosters stakeholder engagement to enable building occupants to contribute to the inner city community and vice versa. Participatory design processes informed mixed-use, community-centred concepts, providing services across age ranges from crèche to elderly accommodation. The concept for integrating the senior residents into Hippostalo shows the enGAGE philosophy in action. Rather than aiming to minimize disturbance to employees, the senior residents are invited to get involved in both using and providing the community services. For example residents can order food from the restaurant delivered to their apartments. They are also encouraged to share their professional skills on the workfloor, a flexible freelance resource only a click on the dashboard away.

The architectural approach enhances the existing structure and radically transforms internal spaces, combining aesthetics, flexibility and utility within an economically viable concept.

 

The Dashboard acts as a community noticeboard, making the built environment truly transparent to its occupants.

The Dashboard acts as a community noticeboard, making the built environment truly transparent to its occupants.

The transformation from office building to vibrant multi-purpose hub makes full use of the site’s infrastructure, and resources. Innovative work patterns are complemented by new living models, with a suite of services catering to a diverse and vibrant community. enGAGE was envisioned as a blueprint for a community hub: a seed for sustainable lifestyles to grow into the community and beyond.

Experientia has previously worked in Finland on Airut, winning first prize in the Low2No competition with engineering firm Arup and architectural firm Sauerbruch Hutton in 2009. The project is now underway, with a low-carbon-emissions building currently being constructed in Helsinki, to be completed by 2014. In 2011 Experientia won Italy’s National Award for Innovation in Service Design as well as an acknowledgement award in the prestigious Holcim Awards for Sustainable Buildings for the Low2No project.  Experientia has also contributed ideas for temporary space usage and community creation to a master plan for urban renewal in Fredericia, Denmark, after successfully reaching second stage of the FredericiaC competition. Other collaborations on architectural projects include concepts for monitoring energy consumption in the CasaZera housing prototype in Turin, Italy; and an entire customer journey vision for a giant observation wheel, Nippon Moon, with UnStudio in 2013.

 

About the Nordic Built Challenge

The Nordic Built Challenge is an initiative to accelerate the development of sustainable building concepts. It invites multidisciplinary teams to compete for the refurbishment of five specific buildings, one in each Nordic country. The challenge is to demonstrate the principles of the Nordic Built Charter by refurbishing existing buildings in innovative and sustainable ways, while ensuring financial and practical viability.

 

Our partners:

Gullstén-Inkinen Design & Architecture is the largest design company specialized in architectural and interior design and real estate renovation in Nordic countries. Gullstén-Inkinen is located in Helsinki and St. Petersburg.

Granlund is an energy management efficiency consultant. Granlund provides expert services in building management and utilities optimization.

Buro Happold is an international architecture and engineering practice working in the built and natural environment tackling the hardest issues that are most relevant to buildings, cities and strategic plans.

5 November 2013

Tesla’s groundbreaking UX: interview with UI manager Brennan Boblett

tesla-touchscreen-a

“Dashboards of the past are littered with physical buttons that can never change, forever ingrained into them. The [Tesla] Model S, by contrast, has a fully upgradeable dash that’s software driven. We started with a blank slate—17” of glass, which is the centerpiece of the interior. That inspired an all-digital touchscreen automotive UI platform built from the ground up—one that could be updated over the air to provide new functionality as the years go on,” says Telsa’s User Interface Manager, Brennan Boblett.

Steve Tengler recently had the opportunity to sit down with Boblett, and the resulting interview published in UX Magazine provides a window into the customer-centric enthusiasm and passion that’s at the core of Telsa’s UX philosophy.

4 November 2013

Experientia presents “BancoSmart”, the innovative ATM interface designed for UniCredit Bank

 

The user-centred approach is moving into finance, as banks increasingly connect to their customers’ needs and wants. As part of this trend, global banking and financial services company UniCredit Bank collaborated with user experience consultancy Experientia to create a user-friendly, people-centred ATM – the BancoSmart.

A customer trials the new BancoSmart interface, with personalised home page.
Click on image to view slideshow

The user-centred approach is moving into finance, as banks increasingly connect to their customers’ needs and wants. As part of this trend, global banking and financial services company UniCredit Bank collaborated with user experience consultancy Experientia to create a user-friendly, people-centred ATM – the BancoSmart.

Experientia has reinvented the ATM interface for UniCredit – making it easier to use, faster, and with more services, all offered through full touchscreen interaction. The new ATM is already in use in selected locations, and will finish its roll out across Italy in 2014.

The first reactions to the BancoSmart interface have been extremely positive, with people commenting on the increased speed, legibility, appealing graphics, and the improvement in features and functions. The highly intuitive ATM interaction allows clients to easily navigate, locate and use functions, from simple features like cash withdrawals to more complicated functions like deposits, information retrieval, bill payments and mobile phone top-ups. The interface is visually attractive and easy to read, with large fonts and clear banking function categories.

Experientia carried out in-depth user experience research as a foundation for the information architecture and service design of the ATM.  Multiple cycles of design, prototyping and user acceptance testing ensured that the final interface is strongly based on people’s banking behaviours and exceeds their expectations and needs for ATM use.

Experientia’s design is a responsive solution that runs on various ATMs including legacy terminals of different providers with various screen sizes and tech specifications. Usability and technical tests were performed across this device range.

BancoSmart offers a full touchscreen interaction, thanks to the extended network of touchscreen ATMs available in Italy (over 6,000 UniCredit touch ATMs, equal to 85% of machines).

The ATM offers several original features, conceived especially for UniCredit Bank, based on the research findings. These include:

  • Speedy withdrawal, with 3 predefined options on the Home Page based on the most frequent behaviours of the user, which the system learns over time. This cuts the time for common task completion by 30%.
  • Georeferenced payment service, which organises bill payment options and filters them based on what is available in the user’s location.
  • Adaptive interface, with a home page that offers personalised content based on the user’s banking profile.
  • Tone of voice, with the creation of a coherent language in all situations, which is more friendly and direct, and provides the correct support during operations.
  • Contextual support and feedback Contextual messages and continuous feedback keep people informed during interaction, particularly in case of data entry errors or other problems, using a clear language and coherent visual support.

UniCredit SpA is an Italian global banking and financial services company. It has approximately 40 million customers and operates in 22 countries.

Experientia® is a global experience design consultancy that practices user research-based and people-centred design. They help companies and organisations conceive and innovate products, services and processes, through a qualitative understanding of people, their mental models and their behaviours.

Experientia won the 2011 Italian National Prize for Innovation in Services, for a low carbon service platform to be implemented in an eco-friendly residential area under construction in Helsinki, “using innovative methodologies devised in Italy.” They have conducted research and design projects in every continent, for industries ranging from mobile telecommunications to sustainability, from automotive to architecture, and much more. Their portfolio includes a range of financial products, aimed at bank and customer use, developed for some of the biggest banks in Italy and Europe.

Experientia’s client roster features Italian and international clients, such as Alcatel Lucent, ASUS, Banca Fideuram, Banca Carige, Condé Nast, CVS Pharmacy, Expedia, Fidelity International, Haier, Intel, Max Mara, Microsoft, Motorola, Mozilla Corporation, Nokia, Samsung Electronics, SAP, Sky,  Trenitalia, Toncelli, UniCredit Bank, United Nations and Vodafone.

 

Contact

Mark Vanderbeeken, Experientia srl, +39 011 812 9687,
[mark dot vanderbeeken at experientia dot com]

4 November 2013

Experientia rivoluziona la user experience degli ATM con “BancoSmart”, l’innovativa interfaccia degli ATM UniCredit

 

Le banche stanno cercando sempre più di entrare in sintonia con le esigenze ed i desideri dei propri clienti, innovando i propri prodotti e servizi secondo una approccio centrato sull’utente. Per dare concretezza a questo principio, UniCredit ha deciso di collaborare con Experientia con l’obiettivo di rinnovare a fondo la user experience del proprio canale ATM.

Un cliente prova la nuova interfaccia di BancoSmart e la home page personalizzata.
Click on image to view slideshow

Le banche stanno cercando sempre più di entrare in sintonia con le esigenze ed i desideri dei propri clienti, innovando i propri prodotti e servizi secondo una approccio centrato sull’utente. Per dare concretezza a questo principio, UniCredit ha deciso di collaborare con Experientia con l’obiettivo di rinnovare a fondo la user experience del proprio canale ATM.

Experientia ha di fatto reinventato l’interfaccia degli ATM UniCredit, rendendola più facile da utilizzare, più veloce e più ricca di servizi, il tutto attraverso un’interazione full touch.

Il nuovo ATM (denominato “BancoSmart”) è già attivo in agenzie selezionate e terminerà il roll out sul territorio italiano nel 2014.

Le prime reazioni al lancio della nuova interfaccia sono state molto positive, in modo particolar riferite alla maggiore velocità, alla grafica più moderna e di facile lettura, al fatto di far emergere con più chiarezza la ricchezza dei servizi offerti. L’interazione intuitiva del nuovo ATM consente ai clienti di navigare, individuare e utilizzare agevolmente tutte le funzioni, da quelle più semplici come il prelievo di contanti a quelle più complesse come il versamento di assegni.

Experientia, prima di procedere con la progettazione, ha condotto una ricerca dettagliata sulla user experience, i cui risultati sono stati alla base dell’architettura dell’informazione e del service design di BancoSmart. Molteplici cicli di design, prototipazione e test con utenti, hanno permesso all’interfaccia di rispondere ai bisogni espressi dalle persone.

BancoSmart funziona su sportelli di fornitori diversi, con schermi di varie dimensioni e specifiche tecniche dissimili fra loro. I test tecnici e i test di usabilità sono stati condotti sull’intera gamma di dispositivi in modo da mantenere inalterata la user experience.

BancoSmart offre un’interazione full touchscreen grazie alla più estesa rete di ATM touch presente in Italia (oltre 6.000 ATM touch UniCredit pari all’85% dell’intero parco posseduto) e presenta funzionalità, alcune del tutto inedite, concepite appositamente per UniCredit e ispirate ai finding emersi dalla ricerca. Tra le principali novità citiamo:

  • Prelievo veloce, con 3 importi immediatamente disponibili sin dalla home page e definiti sulla base dei comportamenti d’uso del cliente, riducendo del 30% il tempo impiegato per il prelievo.
  • Servizi di pagamento georeferenziati, con le opzioni di pagamento organizzate e filtrate per aree geografiche.
  • Interfaccia adattiva, con una home page che offre contenuti personalizzati, adattandosi al profilo dell’utente.
  • Tone of voice unico, con la creazione di un linguaggio coerente in tutte le situazioni, più amichevole, diretto e in grado di fornire il corretto supporto durante le operazioni.
  • Supporto e feedback contestuali fornendo all’utente un aiuto costante durante l’interazione, con messaggi e feedback contestuali, anche in caso di errori o problemi, utilizzando un linguaggio chiaro ed elementi grafici a supporto.

UniCredit S.p.A. è tra i primi gruppi di credito europei e mondiali. Conta oltre 40 milioni di clienti e opera in 22 paesi.

Experientia® è una società internazionale di experience design, il cui obiettivo è supportare società ed organizzazioni a concepire e innovare i propri prodotti, servizi e processi, grazie a una comprensione qualitativa delle persone, dei loro modelli cognitivi e dei loro comportamenti.

Experientia ha vinto il Premio Nazionale per l’Innovazione nei servizi, nel 2011, per un progetto di change behaviour destinato a ridurre le emissioni di carbonio da parte della comunità di residenti di un nuovo complesso residenziale eco sostenibile in costruzione nella città di Helsinki,”utilizzando metodologie innovative concepite in Italia”. Experientia ha condotto ricerca e progetti di design in ogni continente, per settori che spaziano dalle telecomunicazioni mobili alla sostenibilità, dall’automotive all’architettura dall’healthcare all’entertainment e molti altri.

In ambito Finance & Banking Experientia vanta numerose collaborazioni su tutti i principali temi di innovazione, con progetti di ricerca e design sviluppati per alcune fra le maggiori banche italiane ed europee.

La lista di clienti di Experientia annovera aziende e multinazionali italiane e straniere quali:

Alcatel Lucent, ASUS, Banca Fideuram, Banca Carige, Condé Nast, CVS Pharmacy, Expedia, Fidelity International, Haier, Intel, Max Mara, Microsoft, Motorola, Mozilla Corporation, le Nazioni Unite, Nokia, Samsung Electronics, SAP, Sky,  Trenitalia, Toncelli, UniCredit Bank e Vodafone.

 

Contatto

Michele Giannasi, Experientia srl, T. 347 801 2446, [michele dot giannasi at experientia dot com]

4 November 2013

Ottagono Magazine features Experientia

ottagono

In the article “Interaction Design, After Ivrea” Stefano Mirti reflects on the history of the renowned Interaction Design Institute Ivrea and what was born out of it after the school closed. The article, which is published in the November issue of Ottagono, features Experientia as its first case.

You can view it on Issuu.

English text:

“Experientia was already recently spotlighted in Ottagono‘s pages (May, no. 260). But we can’t fail to mention this company founded in Turin by Pierpaolo Perotto, Mark Vanderbeeken, Michele Visciola and Jan-Christoph Zoels, given its uncommon traits. Top quality (and successful) designers put people, their behaviors and their observation thereof at the center of their research. The 35 people in this international group have worked with some of the world’s leading companies. Clients include the likes of Alcatel-Lucent, Asus, Intel, Mozilla, Samsung, SAP, UniCredit, UNStudio (to name just a few) for whom they develop projects on user research, ethnography, interaction design and strategic design. It’s also fascinating to see how their recent undertakings cross design with worlds that are traditionally apart from it, such as healthcare, urban planning, financial services, and mobility. Design is taken to mean innovation in products, services, and processes, putting people and users at the center of focus. Experientia shows how, in order to design, we must understand how people really live. Today and in the future. This leads to five action areas: vision/ understanding/ design/ prototyping/ testing. In Italy this is an uncommon thing.
www.experientia.com

Highlighted projects:

  • Engaging, intuitive and self-learning user interface prototypes for Alcatel-Lucent‘s high definition 2D and 3D Online TVs. Services and content offerings are easy to access, and the systems are goal-oriented rather than function-oriented.
  • A project for Intel analyzes tablets as innovation opportunities in the healthcare system. The screenshot highlights user interfaces that support doctor workflows and patient engagement.
  • The De-Ga building dashboard is an innovative energy demand management system for a new, low-carbon-footprint real estate development in Turin, Italy. Users have quick access to relevant information concerning alerts and notifications, sustainable service availability, and the local community of residents.
3 November 2013

Ethnography: is your company missing the train?

 

Michael Ohler, Phil Samuel and Mark McMurray of BMGI argue in Industry Week that focusing on human behavior and personal experiences can help you discover unmet customer needs and gain a deeper understanding of your customer.

“Ethnography does not start with a hypothesis or a model that the researcher will then try to invalidate and accept as “useful” if he or she fails to do so. Rather, the output of ethnographic research is a frame, pattern or trend that allows putting the vast amount of gathered information into a meaningful context. Sound ethnographic research may require a trained and eventually certified professional. Practitioners also emphasize the need to “give yourself sufficient time” for such studies.

While ethnography is an inductive method, its output can be used for further quantitative deductive research, such as surveys and statistical analysis.”

3 November 2013

[Book] Changing Behaviours: On the Rise of the Psychological State

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Changing Behaviours: On the Rise of the Psychological State
by Rhys Jones, Jessica Pykett and Mark Whitehead
Edward Elgar Publishers
2013, 240 pages
[Amazon link]

Abstract
Changing Behaviours charts the emergence of the behaviour change agenda in UK based public policy making since the late 1990s.
By tracing the influence of the behavioural sciences on Whitehall policy makers, the authors explore a new psychological orthodoxy in the practices of governing. Drawing on original empirical material, chapters examine the impact of behaviour change policies in the fields of health, personal finance and the environment. This topical and insightful book analyses how the nature of the human subject itself is re-imagined through behaviour change, and develops an analytical framework for evaluating the ethics, efficacy and potential empowerment of behaviour change.
This unique book will be of interest to advanced undergraduates, postgraduates and academics in a range of different disciplines. In particular, its inter-disciplinary focus on key themes in the social sciences – the state, citizenship, the meaning and scope of government – will make it essential reading for students of political science, sociology, anthropology, geography, policy studies and public administration. In addition, the book’s focus on the practical use of psychological and behavioural insights by politicians and policy makers should lead to considerable interest in psychology and behavioural economics.

The authors
Rhys Jones, Professor of Human Geography, Institute of Geography and Earth Sciences, Aberystwyth University, UK
Jessica Pykett, Lecturer, School of Geography, Earth and Environmental Sciences, University of Birmingham, UK
Mark Whitehead, Professor of Human Geography, Institute of Geography and Earth Sciences, Aberystwyth University, UK

The Changing Behaviours project
The authors of the book have now began a Changing Behaviours research project that is exploring emerging strategies for changing human behaviours. The project is being funded as part of the Economic and Social Research Council’s Transforming Social Science programme. The primary aim of thistheproject is to consider the ways in which the emerging insights of behavioural science (in particular behavioural psychology, behavioural economics, microeconomics, cognitive design, and neuroscience) are shaping the design of public policy. This project has been designed to provide the first large-scale, international comparative study of behaviour changing initiatives. In addition to studying the application of behaviour changing policies in different countries throughout the world, the team is also exploring the use of alternative, and perhaps, more neurologically empowering approaches to behaviour change (including mindfulness, connected conversations, and critical behavioural literacy). The project, which started in September 2013, will run until February 2015.

[The book was mentioned in this long piece by Evgeny Morozov for the MIT Technology Review]

3 November 2013

First Swedish PhD thesis in service design

stakeholderengagement

Stakeholder Engagement for Service Design is the title of the first Swedish PhD thesis in service design.

In the dissertation defended last week at Linköping University, Fabian Segelström wanted to find out how service designers go about to create an understanding of customers and others who are affected by a service, in order to develop services that better suit their needs.

Segelström explains in a press release at Linköping University that what often happens when a service designer enters a company is that the various departments of the company starts talking with each other and discover that they have much to gain by cooperating more.

Service designers offers a holistic approach that their clients, service provider, often lack. They see the entire process, from when the need arose service until it is delivered and credited made​​. It is about providing quality services and long-term satisfied customers, says Fabian.

He has been closely following service designers and their clients – different service companys – in participant observation in Sweden, Germany and Australia, for a total of nearly four months.

Full abstract:
Service design is a field emerging from the new-found interest in services as a design material by practitioners and academics of the human-centred design tradition. As such, the field can build on the knowledge from previous work in design as well as in service research. Introducing a new design material may however also introduce new challenges to practice. The research presented in this thesis investigates how the design research phase of the human-centred design process is affected by making services a design material.
How users, staff and other stakeholders are involved in service design projects was studied in four studies. Two studies focused on getting a holistic view of how service designers engage stakeholders in their design research. The methods used for these two studies were interviews in one case and participatory observation in the other. The two remaining studies focused on specific aspects of the stakeholder engagement process. One compared how designers and anthropologists approach ethnography, whereas the second investigated the communicative qualities of service design visualisations.
It is argued that service design is a stakeholder-centred design discipline. The tools used in service design are to a large extent borrowed from other qualitative research traditions, but design-specific tools do exist. By analysing and synthesising the information obtained, it is then transformed into insights. These insights are visualised to provide easily accessible representations of service situations.
The final section of the thesis identifies challenges ahead for service design practice, based on the findings of the thesis and based on existing theoretical frameworks for the discipline.

2 November 2013

New York Times book review of “Status Update”

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Putting People First has been following the work of Alice E. Marwick for a while, first when she published her PhD dissertation, then when her book “Status Update” came out.

Now the New York Times has published Walter Kirn’s extensive but not so positive review of her book:

“Alice E. Marwick, an academic observer of American online culture who teaches at Fordham University, would have us believe that the phenomenon of social media functions less as a revolutionary instrument of human liberation than as a peculiarly insidious agent of obedience and conformity. For Marwick, Web 2.0 is a promoter of what, following Foucault, she terms “technologies of subjectivity.” In other words, they turn its users into self-promoting, competitive, superficial “good corporate citizens” whose values are those of the very businesspeople behind the leading social media sites. She sees us as an army of little Mark Zuckerbergs, emulating without our conscious knowledge the highly effective, market-driven habits of “neoliberal” capitalism.”

2 November 2013

Publication: Smart Citizens (by FutureEverything)

futureeverything

Smart Citizens
Edited by Drew Hemment and Anthony Townsend
Future Everything
2013, 96 pages

This publication aims to shift the debate on the future of cities towards the central place of citizens, and of decentralised, open urban infrastructures. It provides a global perspective on how cities can create the policies, structures and tools to engender a more innovative and participatory society. The publication contains a series of 23 short essays representing some of the key voices developing an emerging discourse around Smart Citizens.

Contributors include:

  • Dan Hill, Smart Citizens pioneer and CEO of communications research centre and transdisciplinary studio Fabrica on why Smart Citizens Make Smart Cities.
  • Anthony Townsend, urban planner, forecaster and author of Smart Cities: Big Data, Civic Hackers, and the Quest for a New Utopia on the tensions between place-making and city-making on the role of mobile technologies in changing the way that people interact with their surroundings.
  • Paul Maltby, Director of the Government Innovation Group and of the Open Data and Transparency in the UK Cabinet Office on how government can support a smarter society.
  • Aditya Dev Sood, Founder and CEO of the Center for Knowledge Societies, presents polarised hypothetical futures for India in 2025 that argues for the use of technology to bridge gaps in social inequality.
  • Adam Greenfield, New York City-based writer and urbanist, on Recuperating the Smart City.

FutureEverything is an art and digital innovation organization based in Manchester, England, founded in 1995 around an annual festival of art, music and digital culture. The organization runs year-round digital innovation labs on themes such as open data, remote collaboration, urban interface and environmental mass observation. FutureEverything presents an international art and innovation award, The FutureEverything Award, introduced in 2010.