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Putting People First

Daily insights on user experience, experience design and people-centred innovation
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May 2013
2 May 2013

Design for Public Good, a new report for the European Commission

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The UK Design Council and three other members of the SEE Platform (Sharing Experience Europe) – the Danish Design Centre, Design Wales and Aalto University, Finland – on Tuesday published a new report, Design for Public Good, encouraging the European Union and its member states to adopt design-led innovation to create the next generation of public services and policy that can meet the pressing demands of the future.

The report follows the publication in March of the Design Commission report, Restarting Britain 2, which calls for design thinking to be used to improve UK public services. Design for Public Good now brings this message to the EU, but also extends it to look at the potentially huge gains design methodology can bring to policymaking as well as services.

The report describes the key benefits of design thinking for government as follows:

  • Design-led innovation is a joined-up process, with no inefficient handover from analysis to solution to implementation
  • Rather than jumping straight to expensive and risky pilots, design process tests iteratively, starting with low-cost, simple models (prototypes) and designing out risk with each new version
  • Rather than disjointedly patching together incremental solutions as problems arise, design thinking looks at the entire system to redefine the problem from the ground up
  • Design thinking starts by understanding user needs in order to ensure solutions are appropriate, waste is avoided and end users buy into them
  • While the factors that cause silo structures in government may be stubborn, design methods offer uniquely effective ways of understanding which teams and departments are relevant to a problem and engaging them in collaborations.

Press release

2 May 2013

Designing for the multi-user: missed by Apple, Google and others

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The iPad is a multi-user device according to industry reports, writes Frank Spillers. But you wouldn’t know it from picking up even the latest generation iPad, especially if you are a physician or business user handling sensitive data. The design approach of designing for lone users misses out on a fundamental nature of mobile devices: they are social. To design for the multi-user is to recognize this need for delivering a rich social user experience.

1 May 2013

Write-up on Michele Visciola’s talk at iHub, Kenya

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Michele Visciola, President and Founding Partner of Experientia, gave a talk at iHub in Nairobi, Kenya, last week (see also this earlier post).

The aim of the talk was to demonstrate with actual examples how user experience principles are applicable for large and small projects in tech and other spheres, and to show how insights from user experience research and approaches result in successful accomplishment of project, regardless of their size and scope.

Mark Kamau, Head of iHub’s UXLab, posted a short write-up on the talk on iHub’s blog.

1 May 2013

Talking Design With Intel’s Todd Harple

 

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We cordially invite you to Experientia’s inaugural “Talking Design” evening.

On Wednesday May 8th, at 18.00, we are excited to have Intel’s Todd Harple speaking at the Experientia offices, followed by a light aperitivo.

The “Talking Design” guest speaker evenings are part of our drive to bring the design world to Turin, by hosting a series of talks from global experts in the industry, to share their experiences and knowledge with the staff and friends of Experientia.

Todd Harple is an Experience Engineer and Strategist at Intel Corporation, and is currently on sabbatical at the International Training Centre of the ILO in Turin. He will talk about his experiences in mobile-related research all over the world.

Todd Harple, Experience engineer & strategist, Intel
Todd Harple is an expert anthropologist and ethnographer, with global experience in developing and driving actionable results from ethnographic and context-based research. His work leverages ethnographic and design research techniques to uncover innovative solutions to real-world problems and to identify new market opportunities. Prior to joining Intel, Todd was a social and cultural consultant with work experience in the financial services and natural resource industries as well as in museums, community development and teaching. Todd earned a PhD in cultural anthropology from The Australian National University in 2001.

We are looking forward to seeing you!
The Experientia Team

Where
Experientia
Via Cesare Battisti 15, 10123 Torino, Italy

RSVP
Silvana Rosso – +39 011 812 9687

1 May 2013

London exhibition explores alternative Britain governed by four extreme lifestyle tribes

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Belching cars made of skin and bones, nuclear-powered trains in the shape of mountains and arrow-like formations of joined recumbent bicycles are just some of the ways we might travel around the country in the future, according to designers Dunne and Raby, whose new exhibition at London’s Design Museum opens this week.

United Micro Kingdoms: A Design Fiction imagines an alternative version of England governed by four extreme lifestyle tribes, with disturbing echoes of our own society – and where we might be heading.

The designers have devolved the country into four new counties, each conceived as an experimental zone with its own form of governance, economy and lifestyle. Might you be a Digitarian, driven by a blind faith in technology to join a world where tagging, tracking and total surveillance reign supreme? Or would you rather hang out with the Bioliberals in the rural southwest, producing your own energy, growing your own products and driving a farting biogas vehicle?

Read review in The Guardian

1 May 2013

UK ‘Nudge Unit’ to be privatised

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The UK’s Behavioural Insights Team – known as the “nudge unit” – will join with a commercial partner and become the first policy unit to be spun out of Whitehall, reports the BBC.

It finds ways of “nudging” people to make better choices themselves, rather than through state intervention.

The team, established after the 2010 election, applies insights from academic research in behavioural economics and psychology to public policy and services.

In addition to working with government departments, it has worked with local authorities, charities, non-governmental organisations, private sector partners and foreign government to develop proposals and test them in government policy.

A competition will be held to find a business partner for the unit.