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December 2010
29 December 2010

Videos of UX Week 2010

UX Week
At the end of August Adaptive Path held its UX Week 2010 in San Francisco and uploaded videos of all the presentations a little after. I only noticed them now. Some personally selected highlights:

Data informed, not data driven
by Adam Mosseri, Facebook
At Facebook, analytics play a critical role in informing design decisions, but internally there’s a wariness of the idea of design by numbers.
In this talk we’ll hear about three primary ways Facebook uses quantitative data: optimizing small but important interactions; finding pain points in existing work flows; and setting high level success metrics for large projects.
We’ll hear Facebook’s take on how they think they should improve their ability to quantify some of the less tangible data points, like brand perception and long term network value. Those analytics can begin to perform as counter metrics so that they can begin to rely less heavily on instinct, which is important but sometimes fallible.

How the web works
by Jeffrey Veen, Small Batch Inc.
Turns out that the fundamental principles that led to the success of the web will lead you there, too. Drawing on 15 years of web design and development experience, Jeff will take you on a guided tour of what makes things work on this amazing platform we’re all building together. You’ll learn how to stop selling ice, why web browsers work the way they do, and where Rupert Murdoch can put his business model.

Computational information design
by Ben Fry
The ability to collect and store data continues to increase, but our ability to understand it remains unchanged. Data visualization makes use of our evolutionary proclivity for decoding visual images and employs this ability as a high-bandwidth means of getting data into our heads. In this talk, I’ll present work I’ve developed ranging from illustrations of data for magazines and journals to software tools used by geneticists to interactive applications for Fortune 10 companies.

Video games and the user interface
by Joe Kowalski, Double Fine
Working as a user interface designer in the games industry presents some unique opportunities to engage players. So why are memorable interfaces a rarity? Joe will attempt to answer that question, and he’ll offer his perspective on the industry, show some of his work from major titles, and talk about what inspires him.

Gamestorming: design practices for co-creation and engagement
by Dave Gray, XPLANE
We’re moving from an industrial to a knowledge economy, where creativity and innovation will be the keys to value. New rules apply. Yet two hundred years of industrial habits are embedded in our workplaces, our schools and our systems of government. How must we change our work practices to thrive in the 21st Century? Dave Gray will share insights from his upcoming book, Gamestorming: A playbook for innovators, rule-breakers and changemakers (O’Reilly Media).

The future of UX is play: the 4 keys to fun, emotion and user engagement
by Nicole Lazzaro, XEODesign, Inc.
The future of UX are designs that employ emotions to guide attention, improve memory, enhance performance, and reward users for a job well done. Master these four techniques to paint attention onto a UI like Velcro and color it with emotions that best match the product, brand, or task at hand. Come join us to see how game design can unlock human potential and improve quality of life through play!

Keynote: Mediated culture
by Michael Wesch, Kansas State University
It took tens of thousands of years for writing to emerge after humans spoke their first words. It took thousands more before the printing press and a few hundred again before the telegraph. Today a new medium of communication emerges every time somebody creates a new web application. A Flickr here, a Twitter there, and a new way of relating to others emerges. New types of conversation, argumentation, and collaboration are realized. Using examples from anthropological fieldwork in Papua New Guinea, YouTube, university classrooms, and “the future,” this presentation will demonstrate the profound yet often unnoticed ways in which media “mediate” our culture.

Don’t forget the humans!
by Chris McCarthy and Christi Zuber, Kaiser Permanente’s Innovation Consultancy
Don’t Forget the Humans! This is the mantra in world of healthcare, and over and over again we hear that “patient-centered care” is the perfect desired state. But what about all those other humans in the system? What about the nurses, pharmacists, doctors, transporters and business people? Designing and planning your business for just one type of human not only alienates others, but it actually could be the reason for design failure and solutions that don’t sustain the tests of time.
Our group at Kaiser designs for the humans in our system; we optimize the experience of our patients and clinicians so that the system serves them and their needs, and brings as much joy to their interaction that is, well…. as humanly possible.

Service montage
by Christian Palino, Adaptive Path
In The Godfather, during Michael Corleone’s nephew’s baptism, shots of the sacrament of baptism performed by the priest are mixed with shots of killings ordered by Michael taking place elsewhere. These murders are thus experienced by the audience as Michael’s “baptism” into a life of crime. This collision of shots is an example of Eisenstein’s theory of montage and provides an analogous model for exploring the relationship of service touchpoints to the space between those touchpoints, and how users experience them both.

Understanding and designing the everyday Internet: users, people, groups and networks
by Elizabeth Churchill, Yahoo! Research
Since 2006, time spent on the Internet has outstripped time spent watching TV. According to a Harris Interactive poll conducted in late 2009 people spend an average of 13 hours per week online–excluding email. With the increasing penetration of Internet-enabled phones, many people spend substantially more time than that.
Social scientists, designers, user experience professionals, technologists and business entrepreneurs are all intrigued by the changing landscape of media consumption and communication. As a result, many methods and models have been developed to get an understanding of what people are doing, when, how and why. However, analysis methods are often myopic, addressing either on a single applications (“Is it usable?”), what an single person does (“What is the user up to?”), creating aggregated results from many people, or describing what people-as-nodes are doing in a network. In this talk, Elizabeth will talk about a number of projects where she has mixed different design and evaluation methods to try to understand how people’s experiences vary, and to illustrate the tensions that exist between overly specific and overly general models of user experience.

The Mag+ concept: the silent mode of digital magazine reading
by Sara Öhrvall, Bonnier Group
On April 3rd, 2010, media publisher Bonnier launched Popular Science+ iPad edition as a first step toward a vision of what digital magazine reading can be. See demo.
PopularScience+ is built on the Mag+ platform, developed by Bonnier R&D together with British design studio Berg. The idea was to deconstruct the print layout and to reinvent it in a way that makes it come to life on the iPad’s screen. A new magazine-like UX in which each piece of content flows organically to the next, letting readers feel like they’re touching the actual magazine, without working through layers of buttons.
But if digital magazine reading is all about the silent mode – a leaned back experience away from the browser – how will digital magazines remain contemporary objects in a world where so much more is expected from digital content than just the passive reading? What will be the plus in the Mag+ user experience?
Sara Öhrvall, director of global R&D at Bonnier, will share her thoughts on bridging the gap between magazine content and the interactivity of the social Web. She’ll talk about how the Mag+ platform aims to “socialize” magazine content, bringing it out of the print magazine and into the online spaces where conversation happens.

WIRED’s digital rebirth
by Wyatt Mitchell, Wired magazine
Traditionally, magazine designers and editors have been well-equipped to create compelling experiences in print, but highly crafted digital formats have proven more elusive. With the arrival of the iPad, Condé Nast’s WIRED—in partnership with Adobe—is leading an industry-wide revolution in how people experience and consume magazines. Join Wyatt Mitchell, Design Director of WIRED as he walks through the behind-the-scenes process for the creation of a new digital version of WIRED.

IDEO case study: MyFord Touch – helping define the interior experience for Ford’s 2010 vehicle portfolio
by Iain Roberts and Tasos Karahalios, IDEO
For over two years, designers and engineers at IDEO and Ford Motor Company collaborated closely on a signature HMI experience for the company’s entire Ford and Lincoln 2010 vehicle portfolio that consumers would find simple, attentive, and intuitive. IDEO designers Iain Roberts and Tasos Karahalios will be speaking about the team’s ambitious and ingenious prototyping effort, which included rough-and-ready driving simulators and dashboard interfaces hacked together using a Ford Edge dashboard, touch-sensitive screens, various video game controllers, and the Playstation 2 game “Gran Turismo 3.”

Make It So: learning from SciFi interfaces
by Chris Noessel, Cooper, and Nathan Shedroff, California College of the Arts
Make It So explores how science fiction and interface design relate to each other. The authors have developed a model that traces lines of influence between the two, and use this as a scaffold to investigate how the depiction of technologies evolve over time, how fictional interfaces influence those in the real world, and what lessons interface designers can learn through this process. This investigation of science fiction television shows and movies has yielded practical lessons that apply to online, social, mobile, and other media interfaces.

The reality of fantasy
by Mark Coleran
For many years, Fantasy user interfaces (FUI) in film and television have drawn both acclaim and ridicule in equal measure. Credited with pushing boundaries about what is possible and dumbing down and misrepresenting a complex field of work and setting false expectations in the eyes of users. What is the truth?
In this presentation, Mark Coleran examines why FUI looks the way it does, how it has evolved and the unique challenges and requirements that shape this unusual area of UI work.

22 December 2010

Automakers grapple with New-Age dilemma: software or hardware?

Ford Sync
A somewhat older but no less relevant article by Bill Visnic on how automakers are diverging around the question of how to approach the onboard “infotainment” revolution.

“For each OEM, the basic decision about infotainment is this: whether to “embed” most of the enabling hardware and software for wireless communications into the infrastructure of the vehicle, essentially creating their own mobile devices — or to minimize such integration and concentrate on producing the best possible interfaces with cell phones, smart phones and other devices consumers already are using and bringing into the vehicle.

Ford sits more or less at one end of the spectrum with Sync, whose strength on a practical and marketing basis seems to be that the system makes it easy to use already-favorite wireless devices and programs in Ford’s cars. [...]

On the other end of the scale is GM, which committed itself mainly to an embedded strategy nearly two decades ago with OnStar, building the service into its vehicles — and basically has stuck with that approach since then.”

In setting its strategy, Viscnic says, each OEM is wrestling with the following realities:

  • The demographics of the customer: Unanimously, OEMs see interest in heavily embedded devices and systems being stronger with older people and higher in luxury segments.
     
  • The rate of change: Automakers have long had difficulty keeping up with the incredibly fast pace of change in digital technology compared with the relatively slow speed at which new systems and technologies take root in vehicles and with the overall product cycle of cars. But now the tension is getting worse.
     
  • The ubiquity of mobile devices: Seventy percent of mobile-phone use occurs inside vehicles, so “a responsible OEM” must consider how consumers interact with handsets and other peripherals in the vehicle. Yet smart phones at this point comprise only about 20 percent of the mobile-phone market.
     
  • The tyranny of apps: Consumers increasingly expect to be able to use all their favorite websites and apps on their smart phones in the vehicle even if it isn’t safe for them to do so while driving.
     
  • The issue of redundancy: One of the big advantages of a tethered system is it doesn’t require users of onboard infotainment services to subscribe to another wireless service, such as OnStar or Safety Connect.
     
  • The robustness of onboard systems: For what safety services promote and offer, they really can’t depend on brought-in mobile devices.
     
  • The role of safety: The issue of how infotainment affects driver and passenger safety is on everyone’s lips.

Read article

22 December 2010

Om Malik: Google has a user experience problem

Om Malik
Om Malik, founder of GigaOM Network, argues in a much commented post that Google has a user experience problem:

“As it looks at its future, Google needs to realize that it has a “user experience” problem and its simplicity — the elegant search box — isn’t enough, especially as it starts to compete with rivals whose entire existence revolves around easy, consumer experiences. To me, user experience isn’t about making things pretty and using pretty icons. Instead it’s about making simple, beautiful, usable and user-friendly interfaces.

No one can argue with Google’s ability to engineer great software — they’ve done so in the past — but that simply isn’t good enough in the new worlds they are trying to conquer. Televisions, phones, productivity applications and even Google’s own local pages are less about search and more about engagement: something not core to the company’s corporate DNA.”

Read article

21 December 2010

A rich trove of articles in UX Magazine

UX Magazine
A rich trove of articles in UX Magazine:

The importance of designing an experience culture
By Cynthia Thomas / December 20th 2010
The outward focus on developing good experiences for customers often overshadows the need to live that philosophy inside a company’s own walls. A culture that does not internally live a focus on experience will find it impossible to externally execute the same.

Getting more from analysis
By Jared Lewandowski & John Dilworth / December 16th 2010
Analysis is a key part of the design process that assures the right problems are accurately resolved. When integrated tightly into design processes and teams, analysis can improve understanding of the problems that project teams are challenged to solve. It can also bring clarity to the detailed and often complex requirements that solutions must meet.

Social seen: analyzing and visualizing data from social networks
By Hunter Whitney / December 15th 2010
Emerging social network analysis and visualization techniques can fundamentally change the way we see our relationships with others. These perspectives offer new ways for companies to operate more effectively, for marketers to delve deeper into consumers’ minds, for law enforcement to tracking criminal enterprises, and for individuals to help manage their online reputations.

Making user and customer experience a business competency (video + transcript)
By Harley Manning & Forrester Research / December 14th 2010
UX Magazine sat down with Harley Manning, Vice President, Research Director for Customer Experience at Forrester Research at the Forrester Customer Experience Forum. He discusses how companies are embracing CX and UX strategies, and the value of connecting UX to business economic outcomes.

Is multiscreen enough? Why ‘write once’ shouldn’t be the goal
By Kevin Suttle / December 13th 2010
Though the idea of “write once, deploy everywhere” is enticing to developers and project managers alike, should that be the goal? Granted, productivity is paramount and time is money, but simply resizing the same application to fit on multiple devices doesn’t necessarily ensure the best experience for users.

10 surefire ways to screw up your iPhone app
By Jeremy Olson / December 9th 2010
Ten common iPhone app design and usability mistakes that can shatter hopes of success on the App Store.

The coming zombie apocalypse: Small, cheap devices will disrupt our old-school UX assumptions
By Scott Jenson / December 8th 2010
Designers think of new technologies in terms of yesterday’s tasks, failing to clearly see the real potential of the new technologies.

Portable and powerful: Transforming the patient-provider relationship
By Amy Cueva / December 7th 2010
The author explores the ways mobile technologies are currently being used to enhance patient–provider communication, streamline coordination of care, and improve record-keeping. She also discusses what stands in the way of wider adoption of these potentially life-saving technologies.

20 December 2010

Vodafone foresight on the world in 2020

Future Agenda
Vodafone has launched its new futureagenda website that presents the results of a 12 month insight and foresight programme on the world in 2020.

The project, which was presented last week in Istanbul, Turkey (and only got covered, it seems, by the Turkish press), also includes a book and downloadable pdf (315 pages).

The Future Agenda programme brought together informed people from around the world to analyse the crucial themes of the next ten years. Fifty workshops in twenty-five locations took place and resulted in a unique view of the next ten years. The website reports on the key conclusions.

In the opening section, Vodafone details what it sees as the four macro-scale certainties for the next decade – the things that, unless there is an unexpected, massive and fundamental global shift, will most definitely occur and so are the certitudes upon which everything else is built. These certainties are 1) a continued imbalance in population growth, 2) more key resource constraints, 3) an accelerating eastward shift of economic power to Asia, and 4) pervasive global connectivity.

The second section explores some of the key insights gained into how the world and our lives will probably change over the next decade. These are the key changes that will occur in many different areas, some influenced by just one of the four certainties, others by two or more. These changes are detailed by providing both the signals from today that give evidence to support the direction of change and the future implications over the next ten years. They are grouped into six clusters – health, wealth, happiness, mobility, security and locality – which seem to encompass all the issues highlighted. Each change that is depicted in this section is variously linked to a number of others.

The Future Agenda team invited students of the the Innovation Design Engineering Department (IDE) of the Royal College of Arts to create some solutions to the challenges we face. IDE focuses on using cutting edge product design experimentation and systems thinking to tackle important real world issues with advanced technical design (and) within social parameters. Short videos show the results of this RCA project.

16 December 2010

Book: User Experience Management

User Experience Management
User Experience Management: Essential Skills for Leading Effective UX Teams
By Arnie Lund
Morgan Kaufmann Publishers (Elsevier)
May 2011
ISBN: 978-0-12-385496-4

The role of UX manager is of vital importance — it means leading a productive team, influencing businesses to adopt user-centered design, and delivering valuable products customers. Few UX professionals who find themselves in management positions have formal training in management. More often than not they are promoted to a management position after having proven themselves as an effective and successful practitioner.Yet as important as the position of manager is to the advancement of the field there are no books that specifically address the needs of user experience managers. Though information is available on the Web, nothing ties that advice together in the way a manager would need to integrate it in their work.

User Experience Management speaks directly to the UX manager and to the unique challenges one may face. It outlines the robust framework for how to be an effective UX manager, from creating a team, to orchestrating product development, to ensuring UX is not compromised, to achieving company buy-in on results. This acts as a checklist readers can use to make sure they have covered the bases as they think about how to build their own user experience programs. Written by an experienced UX manager, and containing testamonials from many leading managers in the field, managers both current and aspiring will find this an invaluable reference loaded with ideas and techniques for managing user experience.

Arnie Lund is Director of User Experience and User Experience Community Lead for Microsoft’s IT organization. He also serves on Microsoft’s User Experience Leadership Team. Before moving to IT, he served as the Director of User Experience for the Mobile and Tablet Computing area and helped to ship the recent Vista operating system. Arnie has spent more than 20 years working in the area of user experience and emerging technologies. He began his career at AT&T Bell Laboratories managing both human factors and systems engineering teams. He then moved to one of the companies that emerged from AT&T to help Ameritech build its own Science and Technology organization, where he managed user experience as well as new product ideation. From there he led exploratory software development and user experience teams at US West Advanced Technologies, and information architecture and emerging technology research at Sapient (a leading internet consultancy).

(via DdUX)

16 December 2010

EU action plan to drive take up of online public services

Bill Verplank
The European Commission unveiled an ambitious agenda to bring public services online across Europe so that it could “serve an economy which relies on the networks of the future.”

By 2015, the Commission wants to have 50% of European Citizens using online public services and 80% of businesses. It also wants flexible and collaborative key public services are available online to facilitate the mobility of EU citizens within the internal market in business, work or study irrespective of their original location.

Interestingly, one of the key measures is user empowerment, defined as:
- services designed around users’ needs
- collaborative production of services e.g. using Web 2.0 technologies
- re-use of public sector information (including reviewing the public sector information Directive – see IP/10/1103)
- improvement of transparency
- involvement of citizens and business in policy-making process

Read article (eGov Monitor)

More background:
- EU press release
- Fact sheet: Digital Agenda – what would it do for me?
- Fact sheet: Pilot projects
- Digital Agenda for Europe (website)
- Digital Agenda for Europe (Communication – legal text)
- Speech by Nelly Kroes, VP of European Commission

16 December 2010

Interview with Bill Verplank

Bill Verplank
Steve Baty has published a short interview with Bill Verplank on Johnny Holland.

Bill Verplank is – together with Bill Moggridge – at the origin of the term “interaction design” and one of the speakers at Interaction 11. I got to meet Bill many times at the Interaction Design Institute Ivrea, where he acted as academic advisor and was always impressed by his wisdom.

“Interaction design in the 21st century will be a challenge because almost everything (and everybody) we interact with will have computers in it or on it. Services and systems will be autonomous and only ask for guidance (think of automated cars and guideways); tools will be augmented and powerful; even the most mundane artifact might have far-flung connections and consequences; media will be interactive and engaging and we will all become fashion designers.”

Read interview

16 December 2010

Designing interactive products for children

Apples
Yeevon Ooi of Webcredible writes in a long article that designing interactive products for children shouldn’t be any different from any user-centred design process, but the methods for carrying out user research, the implementation of different design guidelines and evaluating the products need to cater for the young or little audience group.

“Designing for children requires careful planning depending on the nature of the project and the age-group of the children involved. Always determine the age-group of the target audience and use appropriate methods for conducting user research, implementing design guidelines and evaluating the designs. Lastly, a good designer must never forget the ethical considerations involved while designing for children and should exercise their limits accordingly.”

Read article

16 December 2010

Exchanging experiential gifts for the holidays

A Curious Affair
Shareable reports on a new trend of people exchanging experiential gifts – classes, tickets or certificates for new, hands-on experiences.

“The notion that experiences, rather than material possessions, increase happiness has grown over the past decade. After basic needs are met, material possessions no longer improve a person’s happiness, according to researchers.

Psychology professors Leaf van Boven, University of Colorado, and Thomas Gilovich, Cornell University, reported, “Individuals will live happier lives if they invest in experiences more than material possessions … communities will have happier citizens if they make available an abundance of experiences to be acquired.”

Following their 2003 research findings, dozens of papers have been published on the subject, as well as articles and books for the general public. The New York Times recently ran a lengthy feature on the research, and author and life-coach Joe Robinson released, Don’t Miss Your Life, a book exploring the benefits of “participant experiences.”

Wustrack and Carey hope to tap into the wave of interest by turning the experience bazaar into an online marketplace on their website Curiosity Atlas.”

Read article

15 December 2010

Designing (for) women

Erica Eden
AIGA has uploaded the videos of the 2010 Gain conference.

Erica Eden, senior industrial designer at Smart Design, and co-founder at Femme Den, was one of the speakers with her talk “Designing (for) Women: Bridging the Gap Between Assumptions and Realities“.

Femme Den, said the host introducing Erica on the video, “is a group inside Smart that focuses on women, as consumers, as final users but also as designers. [...] They look at women as a departure point for an ‘extended usership’ project. Extended usership is when you look at a minority that might have some kind of setback like being a woman and you decide to actually take that as a departure point for the design process to be used by everybody.”

Abstract
Why is gender important? Smart Design’s Femme Den explores the gap between assumptions and realities about women. As practicing designers, they apply new ways to design for the elusive women’s market. To create products and experiences that women love, designers must better understand their lives, as well as their clients’ objectives and perspectives. Femme Den co-founder Erica Eden will discuss methodologies to meet the needs of, and effectively communicate with, these three interconnected groups.

- Watch video
- Download transcript
- Download slides

New York Times story on Erica Eden

15 December 2010

Untangling the web with Aleks Krotoski

Aleks Krotoski
How has the most revolutionary innovation of our time – the internet – transformed our world? What does it mean for the modern family? How has it changed our concepts of privacy? Of celebrity? Of love, sex and hate?

These are some of the questions that writer and commentator Aleks Krotoski (who is also the brain behind the digital revolution open source documentary) addresses in a new Observer series entitled “Untangling the web“.

The internet’s cyber radicals: heroes of the web changing the world
28 November 2010
A generation of political activists have been transformed by new tools developed on the internet. Here, a leading net commentator profiles seven young radicals from around the world.

Hate and the internet
12 December 2010
Does the internet encourage insidious and bullying behaviour?

Is the internet really killing family life?
26 December 2010
Far from killing the notion of family, the internet is actually solidifying it.

15 December 2010

Happiness doesn’t increase with growing wealth of nations, finds study

Chinese shopper
A survey of developed and developing countries suggests citizens’ sense of wellbeing does not rise with increasing wealth.

“Getting richer does not make a country happier in the long run, according to the largest-ever review of the links between a nation’s wealth and the wellbeing of its citizens.

The researchers looked at life satisfaction data from 37 countries collected over various time periods, from 12 to 34 years, up to 2005. The sample included nations that are developed and developing, rich and poor, ex-Communist and capitalist.”

Read article

14 December 2010

Internet users say, Don’t track me

Gmail
Most Americans don’t want to be tracked on the Internet and are unwilling to trade their privacy for web ads that are tailored to their interests. So suggest the results of a USA TODAY/Gallup Poll of Internet users conducted over the weekend.

The results are based on telephone interviews conducted Dec. 10-12 with a random sample of 814 Internet users living in the continental U.S. The poll has a margin of error of plus or minus 4 percentage points.

Read article

13 December 2010

Out of our brains

Brain cloud
Andy Clark, professor of logic and metaphysics in the School of Philosophy, Psychology, and Language Sciences at Edinburgh University, Scotland, wonders whether devices like iPhones and Blackberries are actually becoming extensions of our thinking selves.

“The fact that there is a stable biological core that we do not “remove and throw down” blinds us to the fact that minds, like bodies, are collections of parts whose deepest unity consists not in contingent matters of undetachability but in the way they (the parts) function together as effective wholes. When information flows, some of the most important unities may emerge in integrated processing regimes that weave together activity in brain, body, and world.”

Read article

13 December 2010

The internet and the ‘end of privacy’

Public living
As part of a new CNN series on internet and the end of privacy, John D. Sutter reflects on the world of public living — where most everything about a person’s habits, location and preferences is just a few clicks away.

“As people share more information about themselves online, the internet, in effect, has created a public transcript of consciousness — storing our thoughts, locations, social lives and memories in data warehouses all over the world.

This has enabled technological advances and shaped our social interactions.

It’s also really freaked some people out.

With a dearth of established, effective methods to manage online privacy, and with digital marketers looking to profit from users’ online lives, some privacy advocates and everyday Web users worry people have lost control of their identities on the internet.”

Read article

13 December 2010

Designing for collaborative consumption

Michelle Thorne
Michelle Thorne, international project manager at Creative Commons, spoke at TEDxKreuzberg on Designing for Collaborative Consumption. She posted her slides and speaking notes online.

Important characteristics of Collaborative Consumption:

Critical Mass
Firstly, you need enough goods or services on offer to make the platform attractive enough for users. Supply draws more demand. Couchsurfing isn’t going to work with two couches on offer.

Idling Capacity
This is about spare cycles. All the unused, material surplus that bolsters collaborative consumption. And it not just about products that sit unused on storage shelves, but also untapped skills, times, spaces. These resources have to be available, like in the drill example, and sharable.

Commons Governance
For these platforms to work, you need appropriate mechanisms for collaboration within legal, social and technical frameworks. There are great tools for this, and definitely the potential to develop more. Conflict resolution has to be cheap and easy, and resource providers need ways to participate in the decision-making process.

Trust
This is one of the most important pillars of collaborative consumption. Without trust, you don’t have continued and meaningful participation and growth. Trust has to be cultivated and facilitated. It’s not just available instantly, but grows organically through the service and positive experiences. Clearly defined boundaries of who’s participating and a way to key at bay trolls, spammers, and frauds, and other elements that harm the community. This requires effective monitoring and reputation management, plus graduated sanctions for people who violate community rules.

Read full story

(via Bruce Sterling)

9 December 2010

Book: This is Service Design Thinking

This is Service Design Thinking
This is Service Design Thinking: Basics – Tools – Cases
by Jakob Schneider and Marc Stickdorn
Book Industry Services (BIS)
16 Dec 2010
Hardcover, 376 pages
Publisher’s pageBook blogAmazon page

This is Service Design Thinking introduces an inter-disciplinary approach to designing services. Service design is a bit of a buzzword these days and has gained a lot of interest from various fields. This book, assembled to describe and illustrate the emerging field of service design, was brought together using exactly the same co-creative and user-centred approaches you can read and learn about inside. The boundaries between products and services are blurring and it is time for a different way of thinking: this is service design thinking.

A set of 23 international authors and even more online contributors from the global service design community invested their knowledge, experience and passion together to create this book.

It introduces service design thinking in manner accessible to beginners and students, it broadens the knowledge and can act as a resource for experienced design professionals. Besides an introduction to service design thinking through five basic principles, a selection of individual perspectives demonstrate the similarities and differences between various disciplines involved in the design of services. Additionally, the book outlines an iterative design process and showcases 25 adaptable service design tools, exemplifying the practice of service design with five international case studies. The book concludes with an insight into the current state of service design research and sets service design thinking in a philosophical context.

In collaboration with: (in alphabetical order) Kate Andrews (UK), Beatriz Belmonte (E), Ralf Beuker (GER), Fergus Bisset (UK), Kate Blackmon (UK), Johan Blomkvist (SE), Simon Clatworthy (NO), Lauren Currie (UK), Sarah Drummond (UK), Jamin Hegeman (USA), Stefan Holmlid (SE), Luke Kelly (NL), Lucy Kimbell (UK), Satu Miettinen (FI), Asier Pérez (E), Bas Raijmakers (NL), Jakob Schneider (GER), Fabian Segelström (SE), Marc Stickdorn (A), Renato Troncon (IT), Geke van Dijk (NL), Arne van Oosterom (NL), and Erik Widmark (S).

(via AHOi!)

> Book review

9 December 2010

Experientia collaborates with top Korean university

UNIST
Experientia, the international user experience design consultancy, has signed a five-year research and education collaboration agreement with the Design and Human Engineering School (DHE) of the Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology (UNIST) – Korea’s new top university – in a quest to change the way that design is seen and practiced in Korea.

UNIST was founded in 2009 in the industrial city of Ulsan, and aims to foster world-class education in science and technology, with top-notch students (top 3% of student intake), faculty (20% foreign), and facilities. All courses are conducted in English. UNIST, which already has a substantial online programme, also aims to be Korea’s first mobile campus: students can watch lectures, get their assignments and track their grades using smartphone apps whenever and wherever they need them.

Traditionally design in Korea has been art-based and offered through art schools. DHE is aiming to change this, by driving global industry collaboration and encouraging a multi-disciplinary approach in research and education. All students have two cross-discipline majors from Integrated Industrial Design, Engineering & Systems Design and Affective & Human Factors Engineering.

The main focus of the Experientia-UNIST/DHE collaboration will be on human-centred design and on applying this powerful innovation approach in the education of future designers and engineers, and in conducting effective applied research projects.

Experientia will support UNIST/DHE in the development of its educational programme, through adding a horizontal user experience driven didactic approach; defining a comprehensive research methods course; contributing specific expertise in areas such as interaction design, interface design and industrial design, amongst others; and organising projects workshops, teacher seminars and summer camps.

Other ideas currently being explored involve student and staff/faculty exchange, co-operation in joint research projects (possibly as part of wider European research initiatives), an in-depth longer-term collaboration on yachting design, and possible joint publications or presentations at international conferences.

In the following months Experientia and UNIST/DHE will work on shaping the specifics of the collaboration agreement through further discussions and project agreements.

Experientia has a long-term commitment to design education and research. Its partners and collaborators have been lecturing and teaching design at important international universities and design schools for many years, including the Academy for Art and Design in Berlin, Germany. Banff New Media Institute (Banff, Canada), Design Center Busan (Busan, South Korea), Domus Academy (Milano, Italy), IED (Torino, Italy), Interaction Design Institute Ivrea (Ivrea, Italy), Jan Van Eyck Academy (Maastricht, Netherlands), Politecnico di Milano (Milan, Italy), Politecnico di Torino (Torino, Italy), Rhode Island School of Design (Providence, RI, USA), Samsungʼs Innovative Design Laboratory (Seoul, South Korea) and Umea – Institute of Design (Umea, Sweden). Experientia has also been involved in several regional and European research projects.

Links:
- Experientia
- UNIST
- Korea Times: UNIST to foster elites in science, tech fields
- Korea Times: Universities’ English-friendly policy has pros and cons
- Joong Ang Daily: Unist aims to be Korea’s first mobile campus

8 December 2010

Social innovation is our motivation

Snook
Sarah Drummond, one half of Scotland based dynamic duo Snook, presents a case study about the implications and challenges of using Service Design for Social Innovation in the community of Wyndford, UK.

Watch video

(via InfoDesign)