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Putting People First

Daily insights on user experience, experience design and people-centred innovation
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October 2009
4 October 2009

The shift from human-centered to resource-centered design

Shoppers
Eric Wilmot writes on Greener Design on how to design for a post-consumption society. And an excellent article it is.

“The current interpretation of human-centered has expanded to indulge human desires at the expense of other equally critical considerations. This is a dangerous interpretation that has become default for many leading academic and professional creative practices. Don Norman explains the main concern of such unquestioning adoption of human centered approaches: “The focus upon individual people (or groups) might improve things for them at the cost of making it worse for others.”

In reality, our human-centeredness has driven us to the brink of unsustainable lifestyle through the strain our over-consumption is putting on our natural resources, and may represent the largest self-inflicted problem a species has ever created for itself short of Easter Island.”

Read full story

4 October 2009

It’s brand new, but make it sound familiar

Horseless carriage
When companies develop innovative products that don’t obviously fit within established categories, managers need to help people understand what they are. However what category you place something in has a huge influence on how you view its basic properties. Mary Tripsas reports in the New York Times.

“Depending upon what cues they are given, people will place the same item in different categories.

In management, these traits imply that companies can benefit by using comparisons to create expectations that best match an innovation’s strengths. […]

Finding the right label is only one of the many ways organizations can influence the way consumers categorize a product. They can also experiment with the product’s shape, packaging, pricing and retail store placement.”

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2 October 2009

Donald Norman on co-creation as a “transmedia” design challenge

21 CTIS
Donald Norman recently gave a keynote address at the “21st Century Transmedia Innovation Symposium” in Seoul, Korea.

“Normal dictionaries do not have the word ‘transmedia,'” he says, “but Wikipedia does. That definition introduced me to many other words that neither I nor my dictionaries had never before heard (for example, narratological). Strange jargon aside, I do believe that there is an important idea here, which explore in this column.”

“Let transmedia stand for those multi-sensory natural experiences: trans-action, trans-sensory. Let it stand for the mix of modalities: reading and writing, speaking and seeing, listening and touching, feeling and tasting. Let it stand for actions and behavior, thought and emotion. My form of transmedia has nothing to do with companies and formal media channels. It has everything to do with free, natural powerful expression.

There is another side of this new transmedia: co-development, co-creation, co-ownership. In this new world, we all produce, we all share, we all enjoy. Teacher and student learn together achieving new understanding. Reader and writer create together. Game player and game developer work together. This is the age of creativity, where everyone can participate. Everyone can be a designer. Everyone can be involved.”

Read full story

2 October 2009

Panoremo, a tool to assess the emotional experience of environments

Panoremo
As part of his Design for Interaction MSc. at the TU Delft, David Güiza Caicedo worked on developing a tool to measure emotional reactions towards ‘services’, from which an early concept has recently spun-off into a more developed tool to aid in the assessment of emotions towards ‘physical spaces’.

The tool, now called Panoremo, is meant to collect feedback from users in order to evaluate their emotional reaction towards any sort of physical spaces.

This opens up the door to a plethora of possibilities and applications: evaluating an urban environment to know how people feel about their surroundings (emotions in architecture and urbanism), finding out how people feel about that new interior design that you are developing for a new store (emotions in retail design) or identifying the critical emotional points of a restaurant or of a hotel lobby (emotions in experiential services) are but a few of the examples to think of.

2 October 2009

Touchpoint Issue 2 “Health and Service Design”

Touchpoint 2
The second issue of Touchpoint, the sdn’s Service Design Journal, is out.

Entitled “Health and Service Design”, this brand-new issue features articles of Service Design and/or healthcare experts such as Julia Schaeper, Lynne Maher and Helen Baxter (NHS), Lavrans Løvlie (liveIwork), Ben Reason (live|work), Mark Mugglestone (NHS) and John-Arne Røttingen (Norwegian Knowledge Centre for the Health Services), Tine Park (Designit) and Christine Janae-Leoniak (Mayo Clinic) as well as interviews with representatives from these areas.

The health sector contributes to everyone’s wellbeing, quality of life, and ultimate life expectancy but the sector is also important economically–for health and wellness industries and governments. A balanced relationship between the increase of quality and the reduction of costs is of crucial interest – for patients, providers and payers within our health care systems. Improvements within this system not only take advantage of innovative technologies and medical research findings, but also respect and design the experience of patients and caregivers– taking them as serious partners in a process of preserving or restoring health. There are opportunities to rethink service offerings, service delivery systems and organizational structures, hierarchies and, last but not least, the quality of interactions among people and machines. New ideas might even revolutionize existing physician/patient traditions.

This volume of Touchpoint explores the individual, social and economic relevance of health systems and the potential of Service Design to redesign and reinvent service offerings, service processes and service interactions.

More info

1 October 2009

The user experience of smart phones

Blackberry Bold
Several articles on the smart phone user experience:

Getting emotional about mobile phones
A nationwide study of over 3000 people has found that there is a direct correlation between the way people use their phones, and the way they feel for the day.

Available all the time: etiquette for the social networking age
As Facebook, Twitter and 24-hour Blackberry access blur the lines between business and personal lives, managers and employees are struggling to develop new social norms to guide them through the ongoing evolution of communications technology.

iPhone ‘undisputed’ leader in customer satisfaction, study reports
A new study by the CFI Group reports that the iPhone has taken the top spot in customer satisfaction. The company surveyed over 1,000 smartphone users and the iPhone (surprise, surprise) came out as the top dog.