counter

Putting People First

Daily insights on user experience, experience design and people-centred innovation
Audience Business Culture Design Locations Media Methods Services Social Issues

Children


Disabled


Elderly


Gender


Teens


Advertising


Branding


Business


Innovation


Marketing


Mechatronics


Technology


Architecture


Art


Creativity


Culture


Identity


Mobility


Museum


Co-creation


Design


Experience design


Interaction design


Presence


Service design


Ubiquitous computing


Africa


Americas


Asia


Australia


Europe


Italy


Turin


Blogging


Book


Conference


Media


Mobile phone


Play


Virtual world


Ethnography


Foresight


Prototype


Scenarios


Usability


User experience


User research


Education


Financial services


Healthcare


Public services


Research


Tourism


Urban development


Communications


Digital divide


Emerging markets


Participation


Social change


Sustainability


May 2009
2 May 2009

Putting people first: working together with user-led organisations

Putting people first
This document from the UK Department for Health outlines the benefits that local authorities, and their residents, enjoy when they work with user-led organisations.

Benefits range from helping local authorities deliver greater personalisation to improved engagement with hard-to-reach population groups.

User led organizations are led and controlled by the people who they help, disabled people, carers and other people who use services. They provide a range of services, including information and advice, advocacy and peer support, support in using direct payments and individual budgets, and disability equality training. They bring together people with a common purpose and can include any people with impairments, such as people with learning disabilities, mental health survivors, people from ethnic backgrounds and older people.

The organisations benefit their clients by promoting independent living, empowering citizens to shape their own lives and the services they receive, implementing the Disability Equality Duty, tackling social exclusion and empowering local communities.

They also benefit local authorities by helping to deliver the personalisation agenda and person-centred services, such as information, advice and advocacy support.

Involving user led organizations can bring substantial benefits in delivering programmes in which they add value, such as independent living, health prevention and promotion, employment, carers strategy, community empowerment and social inclusion.

The document argues that user led organizations should be embedded into mainstream structures and processes and that their development should be supported by appointing local champions.

2 May 2009

On engineering and design: an open letter

Bill Buxton
Microsoft Research Principal Scientist Bill Buxton calls for engineers and user-experience designers to learn to appreciate one another:

“End-user satisfaction and quality of experience need to be the fundamental pillars of any worthy company’s value system. Hence organizations must be structured in a way that tilts the odds in favor of achieving these goals. Good intentions are a start, but they are not sufficient. Appropriate tools and skills at the highest professional standards, applied according to best practice, are what’s needed.

Every project thus needs equally high levels of competence in the mutually dependent but different disciplines of engineering and UX. Professional stature is equally hard to achieve in each, and there are no simple shortcuts that let one jump from one to the other: This is no place for amateurs.”

Read open letter

1 May 2009

ACM rolls out new Communications website, which features Putting People First

CACM
ACM has launched a new website for its flagship publication Communications of the ACM, the world’s premier monthly magazine for the computing and information technology fields, and Putting People First features prominently on the site (and in the launch press release):

New York, NY, April 30, 2009 – ACM has launched a new Web platform to complement the print content of its flagship publication Communications of the ACM, the leading publication in computing and information technology that is read by computing professionals worldwide. The Website http://cacm.acm.org features exclusive news, opinion, research, and information as well as extensive content from the current issue, and the complete archived issues of Communications that span more than 50 years of in-depth coverage of the computing profession. The site also offers access to searchable content from the ACM Digital Library and from other sources around the Web, and hosts a robust blog section that is updated daily. Contributions from a continually growing community of bloggers representing leading industry experts are accessible by both subscribers and the general public. [...]

A two-tier blog structure has been created for the Communications Web platform. It includes a BLOG@CACM of on-site experts covering topical computing issues who encourage comments about their posts, and a Blogroll of syndicated bloggers that reflects the geographic and intellectual scope of the computing world with entries and related discussions off-site.

Among the featured bloggers are leading authorities from industry and academia, including Scott Aaronson of MIT on theory, Jason Hong of Carnegie Mellon University on mobile computing, James Horning of Sparta Inc. on security, Tessa Lau of IBM Almaden Research Center on Intelligent Interfaces, Greg Linden of Microsoft Live Labs on personalized information, and Peter Norvig of Google on search. The Blogroll includes postings from USACM on public policy issues; the ACM-W Council on Women in Computing; the Computing Community Consortium for fostering new research visions; a blog on the discovery and application of emerging technologies; high performance computing news for supercomputing professionals; and insights on user experience and putting people first.

Thank you, ACM.

Read press release