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Putting People First

Daily insights on user experience, experience design and people-centred innovation
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March 2005
31 March 2005

It’s not just a phone, it’s an adventure [The New York Times]

 
Larry Azlin, a software engineer in El Cerrito, Calif., considers himself one of the lucky ones. His aging clamshell cellphone, a Motorola V60, seems to work just fine. But once he gives it some thought, it occurs to him that he does have a few complaints.

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21 March 2005

Wireless: European cellphone firms plan major research effort [International Herald Tribune]

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Many wireless industry executives want the European Union to get serious about the future.

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21 March 2005

Outsourcing innovation [Business Week]

 
First came manufacturing. Now companies are farming out R&D to cut costs and get new products to market faster. Are they going too far?

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21 March 2005

Apple’s blueprint for genius [Business Week]

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Handling its own design work is one reason for best-sellers like the iPod and Shuffle. Steve Jobs is the other.

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21 March 2005

Italy’s new wave [Metropolis Magazine]

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A cadre of young architects looks to shake up the country’s long-stagnant building culture.

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20 March 2005

Vodafone’s Future Vision

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“In the Vodafone Future Vision website you can explore what we think that future might look like, experience some of the changes we believe will happen, and tell us what you think of them.”

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18 March 2005

The Brand Gap

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Marty Neumeier’s new book is an insightful justification for tighter integration of design and business strategy to enable strong brands.

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17 March 2005

On this Wiki, everyone’s a critic [Business Week]

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Stanford’s Lawrence Lessig, whose next book will be revised by visitors to a collaborative Web site, explains “user-supplied innovation”.

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16 March 2005

Suddenly, it’s fast forward at TiVo [Business Week]

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The digital video recording service’s Comcast deal delivers 21.5 million potential new users and transforms a faltering player into the industry’s star.

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15 March 2005

Mobile phone becomes train ticket [BBC]

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Public transport users in Tyne and Wear may soon be able to use their mobile phone as a bus or train ticket.

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14 March 2005

A Whole New Mind: Moving from the Information Age to the Conceptual Age

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Lawyers. Accountants. Radiologists. Software engineers. That’s what our parents encouraged us to become when we grew up. But Mom and Dad were wrong. The future belongs to a very different kind of person with a very different kind of mind. The era of “left brain” dominance, and the Information Age that it engendered, are giving way to a new world in which “right brain” qualities-inventiveness, empathy, meaning-predominate. That’s the argument at the centre of this provocative and original book, which uses the two sides of our brains as a metaphor for understanding the contours of our times.

In the tradition of Emotional Intelligence and Now, Discover Your Strengths, Daniel H. Pink offers a fresh look at what it takes to excel. A Whole New Mind reveals the six essential aptitudes on which professional success and personal fulfillment now depend, and includes a series of hands-on exercises culled from experts around the world to help readers sharpen the necessary abilities. This book will change not only how we see the world but how we experience it as well.

Visit book website
Go to Daniel Pink’s blog

11 March 2005

A simple Kyoto Protocol explanation

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Go to website

10 March 2005

Samsung is now what Sony once was [The New York Times]

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In 1997, Sony took little notice of Samsung. Less than a decade later, Samsung has twice the market capitalisation of Sony.

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10 March 2005

Does Europe need its own technology institute? [International Herald Tribune]

 
A proposal to create a European technology institute modeled on the Massachusetts Institute of Technology faces serious questions about financing and academic support, lawmakers say.

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10 March 2005

MP3 developer yields royalty riche [International Herald Tribune]

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German labs rely on firms and state to finance research.

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10 March 2005

The rise of the creative consumer [The Economist]

 
How and why smart companies are harnessing the creativity of their customers.

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10 March 2005

The device that ate everything? [The Economist]

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Will snazzy mobile phones gobble up digital cameras, music players and other portable devices?

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10 March 2005

A spiritual connection [The Economist]

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Around the world, mobile phones seem to have a spiritual or supernatural dimension that other forms of technology lack.

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10 March 2005

Behind the digital divide [The Economist]

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Much is made of the “digital divide” between rich and poor. What do people on the ground think about it?

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10 March 2005

The future, just around the bend [The Economist]

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Ray Kurzweil is an accomplished inventor, but he is best known for his wild prognostications about the future. Is he as crazy as he sounds?

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