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Putting People First

Daily insights on user experience, experience design and people-centred innovation
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February 2005
18 February 2005

Investment bank sees blogging as way to find ‘stars of tomorrow’ [The New York Times]

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Blogging has transformed political commentary, rattled the media business and inundated the Internet. Does it have a place on Wall Street?

ThinkEquity Partners, a boutique investment bank in San Francisco, was going to find out on Thursday by introducing a Web log. The firm, which specializes in technology, health care and other fast-growing fields, is seeking to make its investment research department – an albatross at most Wall Street firms – relevant.

ThinkEquity is betting that the blog will attract analysts, bankers, investors, venture capitalists and anyone else interested in talking about growth investing, helping the company generate ideas.

The firm’s research is available to all and, once registered, anyone can post feedback on the site. The blog can be found at www.thinkequity.com/blog.

17 February 2005

Artful making: what managers need to know about how artists work

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Artful Making offers the first proven, research-based framework for engineering ingenuity and innovation. This book is the result of a multi-year collaboration between Harvard Business School professor Robert Austin and leading theatre director and playwright Lee Devin.

Together, they demonstrate striking structural similarities between theatre artistry and production and today’s business projects–and show how collaborative artists have mastered the art of delivering innovation “on cue,” on immovable deadlines and budgets.

These methods are neither mysterious nor flaky: they are rigorous, precise, and–with this book’s help–absolutely learnable and reproducible. They rely on cheap and rapid iteration rather than on intensive up-front planning, and with the help of today’s enabling technologies, they can be applied in virtually any environment with knowledge-based outputs. Moreover, they provide an overarching framework for leveraging the full benefits of today’s leading techniques for promoting flexibility and innovation, from agile development to real options.

Read full review

14 February 2005

U.S. companies rethinking their marketing in Europe [The New York Times]

 
For years, American corporations and the European companies that do business with them have faced anti-American sentiments from Europeans. But with the war continuing in Iraq and discomfort growing over United States dominance, the companies have been forced to further adjust how they do business in Europe.

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14 February 2005

Blogging at the Davos World Economic Forum

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Even the Davos World Economic Forum now has its own weblog.

Go to the Davos blog

13 February 2005

Microsoft’s chief humanising officer [The Economist]

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Does Robert Scoble, a celebrity blogger on Microsoft’s payroll, herald the death of traditional public relations?

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11 February 2005

Technology gets the creative bug [BBC]

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The hi-tech and the arts worlds have for some time danced around each other and offered creative and technical help when required.

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10 February 2005

Wolves in shops’ clothing [Fortune]

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“Lifestyle centres” make big-box retailers look and feel like small-town shops. How can entrepreneurs compete?

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10 February 2005

Institute without Boundaries

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Change the world.

Go to website